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26.05.2022

EREMA Group: Growing revenues, plant sizes and production capacities

The EREMA Group, which comprises EREMA Group GmbH and its subsidiaries EREMA, PURE LOOP, UMAC, 3S, KEYCYCLE and PLASMAC, closed the 2021/22 financial year with a 17 percent increase in revenue. Consolidated Group revenue amounted to EUR 295 million, and the number of employees increased to over 840. The EREMA Group remains on course for continued growth.

A closer look at the post consumer segment clearly shows a trend towards larger plants, both for PET recycling and for processing polyolefins. For example, the first VACUREMA® Basic 2628 T machine with an annual capacity of up to 40,000 tonnes was recently commissioned at a customer's site in Brazil. This plant features a ten-meter-long special geometry screw with a diameter of 280 millimetres and a weight of 3.5 tonnes. The screw was developed and manufactured by 3S, a subsidiary of EREMA GmbH.

The EREMA Group, which comprises EREMA Group GmbH and its subsidiaries EREMA, PURE LOOP, UMAC, 3S, KEYCYCLE and PLASMAC, closed the 2021/22 financial year with a 17 percent increase in revenue. Consolidated Group revenue amounted to EUR 295 million, and the number of employees increased to over 840. The EREMA Group remains on course for continued growth.

A closer look at the post consumer segment clearly shows a trend towards larger plants, both for PET recycling and for processing polyolefins. For example, the first VACUREMA® Basic 2628 T machine with an annual capacity of up to 40,000 tonnes was recently commissioned at a customer's site in Brazil. This plant features a ten-meter-long special geometry screw with a diameter of 280 millimetres and a weight of 3.5 tonnes. The screw was developed and manufactured by 3S, a subsidiary of EREMA GmbH.

Demand for previously-owned machines at UMAC also remained high during the past financial year. In addition to the general trend towards plastics recycling, the decisive factor here is that customers are more frequently opting for previously-owned systems available at short notice due to the tense situation on the procurement markets. At the same time, businesses that have so far had little contact with recycling are also becoming increasingly interested in this topic. Their need for feasibility studies, consulting and engineering services, project management and turnkey projects are now also very successfully catered for by KEYCYCLE, an EREMA Group company. KEYCYCLE has also acquired from Cadel Deinking the patent, technology and distribution rights for an innovative ink removal technology, which is now being further developed using the know-how of the EREMA Group and shaped into a product that meets industrial standards.

The initiative launched four years ago to modernise and expand existing EREMA Group sites was continued during the past financial year with the expansion and construction of a dedicated machine demonstration centre for PLASMAC in Milan. Equipped with additional production floor space and new and enlarged customer centres, all companies within the group are now well prepared to meet rising demand, and with the new research and development centre under construction in Ansfelden, the framework for further outstanding plastics recycling milestones from EREMA is currently being optimised.

Source:

EREMA Group GmbH

Albini joins C.L.A.S.S. Material Hub (c) Albini Group
Off The Grain, one of the latest examples of responsible innovation by ALBINI_next
18.05.2022

Albini joins C.L.A.S.S. Material Hub

Albini Group, historic manufacturer of high-end shirting fabrics, meets C.L.A.S.S. Eco Hub, international platform for the promotion and development of innovative and sustainable textiles. Two groundbreaking companies joining forces in the name of ethical and technological development through the C.L.A.S.S. Material Hub, the section dedicated to fibers, threads, yarns and fabrics that are changing the fashion and textile industry.  The values in which Albini Group believes and the strong sensitivity to environmental issues have led the company to also address the issue of the risk of toxic and harmful chemicals in a systemic way, integrating into the production cycles activities and controls aimed at gradually eliminating their presence, with the clear objective of protecting man and the environment.

Albini Group, historic manufacturer of high-end shirting fabrics, meets C.L.A.S.S. Eco Hub, international platform for the promotion and development of innovative and sustainable textiles. Two groundbreaking companies joining forces in the name of ethical and technological development through the C.L.A.S.S. Material Hub, the section dedicated to fibers, threads, yarns and fabrics that are changing the fashion and textile industry.  The values in which Albini Group believes and the strong sensitivity to environmental issues have led the company to also address the issue of the risk of toxic and harmful chemicals in a systemic way, integrating into the production cycles activities and controls aimed at gradually eliminating their presence, with the clear objective of protecting man and the environment.

Three main research areas - innovative fibers and yarns, sustainable dyes and green chemistry - united by the task of transferring cutting-edge technologies through open innovation. Among the new projects presented is "Off the Grain," born from the collaboration with Riso Gallo, a leading rice producer in Italy. It is a new type of dye derived from the processing of a particular variety of black rice: the boiling water of the rice, which can no longer be used for the food industry, is transformed into a natural dye, resulting in significant water savings during the dyeing process.

"Grounded Indigo" is a natural textile dyestuff, born from the search for dyeing practices that are more responsible to people and the environment. For this project, ALBINI_next chose to collaborate with Stony Creek Colors, an American producer of the world's only 100% plant-based indigo that is USDA BioPreferred certified.

The third project, called "HempFeel," is an innovative hemp oil-based finishing, tipically used for cosmetic products. ALBINI_next was the first company to apply it to fabrics of different weights, compositions and structures. HempFeel replaces silicones usually used in finishing, thus reducing the release of microplastics and giving fabrics a soft and durable hand.

"When discussing values related to creativity, next-generation production and commitment to ethics and traceability, Albini is an extremely important point of reference." says Giusy Bettoni, founder and CEO of C.L.A.S.S. "This is why we are delighted with its inclusion within our Material Hub, alongside its colleagues of the responsible innovation movement. Follow us on this new common path. Next- generation solutions and nice surprises will not be missed."

18.05.2022

Hexcel at JEC World 2022

  • Hexcel Composite Innovations for Aerospace Applications on Display at JEC World 2022: Hall 5, Stand J41

In late 2021, Hexcel announced an agreement with Fairmat, a deep technology startup, to build the capability to recycle carbon fiber prepreg from Hexcel European operations for reuse in composite panels sold into commercial markets, giving a second life to recovered carbon fiber. To do so, Fairmat has developed a virtuous recycling process, and a sample of its newly recycled material will be available to view at JEC World 2022. Hexcel will present an array of product innovations for aerospace and urban air mobility customer applications during JEC World 2022 in Paris on May3-5. These latest innovations demonstrate the company’s leadership in developing advanced composites technology for the aerospace market.

  • Hexcel Composite Innovations for Aerospace Applications on Display at JEC World 2022: Hall 5, Stand J41

In late 2021, Hexcel announced an agreement with Fairmat, a deep technology startup, to build the capability to recycle carbon fiber prepreg from Hexcel European operations for reuse in composite panels sold into commercial markets, giving a second life to recovered carbon fiber. To do so, Fairmat has developed a virtuous recycling process, and a sample of its newly recycled material will be available to view at JEC World 2022. Hexcel will present an array of product innovations for aerospace and urban air mobility customer applications during JEC World 2022 in Paris on May3-5. These latest innovations demonstrate the company’s leadership in developing advanced composites technology for the aerospace market.

  • Sustainability Focus on Recycling and Reuse
  • HiTape® and HiMax® Reinforcements for OoA Processing
  • Innovative HiFlow™ Resins for Continuous and Shorter Cycle Injection Processes
  • HexPly® Prepregs for Primary Structure and Engine Applications
  • HexTow® High Modulus Fibers HM63 and HM54
  • Thermoplastics and Processing Innovations for Primary and Secondary Structures
  • Lightweight PrimeTex® Reinforcements Solutions for Urban Air Mobility (UAM)
 Innova Fabrics chooses ROICA™ V550 by Asahi Kasei for its responsible RF (Residual Free) line (c) Innova Fabrics
Innova Fabrics Residual Free Line
11.05.2022

Innova Fabrics chooses ROICA

  • ROICA™ V550 by Asahi Kasei for its responsible RF (Residual Free) line

Innova Fabrics, the Italian manufacturer of knitted fabrics for apparel, underwear and sports, confirms its choice of ROICA™ by Asahi Kasei, the Japanese leader of premium stretch fiber, for its new responsible line RF (Residual Free).

Despite the deep-rooted history of the company's team in the world of textiles, Innova Fabrics is a reality that is not afraid to innovate with a focus on environmental sustainability. As a result of its push for local production and attention to third-party sustainability certifications (including OEKO-TEX Standard 100, one of the world's best-known labels for textiles tested for harmful substances), Innova Fabrics continues its promise of responsibility with an enrichment of its conscious proposals. In the last season, Innova has increased its smart proposition by launching the RF (Residual Free) line, with the aim of reducing the impact of microplastics residues produced by the fashion industry. This is possible thanks to the combination of two responsible ingredients: SENSIL® Biocare by Nilit and ROICA™ V550 by Asahi Kasei.

  • ROICA™ V550 by Asahi Kasei for its responsible RF (Residual Free) line

Innova Fabrics, the Italian manufacturer of knitted fabrics for apparel, underwear and sports, confirms its choice of ROICA™ by Asahi Kasei, the Japanese leader of premium stretch fiber, for its new responsible line RF (Residual Free).

Despite the deep-rooted history of the company's team in the world of textiles, Innova Fabrics is a reality that is not afraid to innovate with a focus on environmental sustainability. As a result of its push for local production and attention to third-party sustainability certifications (including OEKO-TEX Standard 100, one of the world's best-known labels for textiles tested for harmful substances), Innova Fabrics continues its promise of responsibility with an enrichment of its conscious proposals. In the last season, Innova has increased its smart proposition by launching the RF (Residual Free) line, with the aim of reducing the impact of microplastics residues produced by the fashion industry. This is possible thanks to the combination of two responsible ingredients: SENSIL® Biocare by Nilit and ROICA™ V550 by Asahi Kasei.

SENSIL® BioCare is the premium, sustainable nylon 6.6 fiber enriched with a special technology that helps reduce the persistence of textile waste in the ocean and landfills by acting during and after the product's life cycle. Therefore, if the microplastics in SENSIL® BioCare garments are released during washing, they will decompose much faster than conventional Nylon 6.6 fibers, reducing textile waste. ROICA™ V550, part of the ROICA Eco-Smart™ family, is the premium, sustainable stretch yarn that degrades without releasing harmful substances into the environment, according to the Hohenstein's environmental certification. ROICA™ V550 also carries the Gold Level Material Health certificate from the Cradle-to-Cradle Product Innovation Institute, which evaluated the yarn's impact on human and environmental health. The strong relationship established between Innova Fabrics and ROICA™ by Asahi Kasei is a long-standing one: from the very beginning, the textile company chose ROICA™ as its main reference for premium stretch, using ROICA Colour Perfect™ in most of its articles. Having experienced the innovation of the ROICA™ line dedicated to high-quality color, Innova decided to opt for the ROICA Eco-Smart™ line as part of the extension of its environmentally conscious line.

Thanks to the constant synergy with its premium partner in innovative and responsible stretch, Innova continues its path towards a textile and fashion industry that respects the planet, without forgetting profit. And this is just the beginning. Innova Fabrics pieces containing SENSIL® BioCare and ROICA™ V550

Source:

C.L.A.S.S.

10.05.2022

BB Engineering shortlisted for Plastics Recycling Awards Europe

BB Engineering has been shortlisted for the Plastics Recycling Awards Europe 2022 for the category Recycling Machinery Innovation with its PET recycling line VacuFil® Visco+ for fiber-to-fiber inline recycling.

The process presented as part of the award is the combined VacuFil® Visco+ with VarioFil®. This machinery enables the textile industry to perform closed-loop inline recycling of post-consumer polyester (PET) textile waste. The given recycling technology is a thermo-mechanical recycling process optimized for the textile industry. Key component here is the liquid state polycondensation reactor, known as Visco+, to adjust the intrinsic viscosity. Compared to existing fiber recycling processes, which address rather less demanding textile applications and don’t include subsequent spinning, BBE’s solution is a whole-in-one process that enables the textile industry to perform closed-loop inline recycling of post-consumer PET fiber waste even into high-tech textile yarns with low dpf-values.

BB Engineering has been shortlisted for the Plastics Recycling Awards Europe 2022 for the category Recycling Machinery Innovation with its PET recycling line VacuFil® Visco+ for fiber-to-fiber inline recycling.

The process presented as part of the award is the combined VacuFil® Visco+ with VarioFil®. This machinery enables the textile industry to perform closed-loop inline recycling of post-consumer polyester (PET) textile waste. The given recycling technology is a thermo-mechanical recycling process optimized for the textile industry. Key component here is the liquid state polycondensation reactor, known as Visco+, to adjust the intrinsic viscosity. Compared to existing fiber recycling processes, which address rather less demanding textile applications and don’t include subsequent spinning, BBE’s solution is a whole-in-one process that enables the textile industry to perform closed-loop inline recycling of post-consumer PET fiber waste even into high-tech textile yarns with low dpf-values.

The Plastics Recycling Awards Europe 2022 winners will be announced on 23 June, during the second day of the Plastics Recycling Show Europe taking place at the RAI Amsterdam.

(c) ChemSec, report Not Quite 100%
28.04.2022

ChemSec' Study: Consumer brands demand clarity on recycled plastics

A new interview study from NGO ChemSec shows that there is a gap between supply and demand when it comes to recycled materials, causing confusion and bottlenecks. Among other things, suppliers go out of their way using elaborate trade schemes to reach the coveted ”100% recycled” tag, which – it turns out – is not that important to consumer product brands. Far more crucial aspects, according to several major B2C companies, are:

  • Honest communication towards customers
  • Comprehensive information from suppliers
  • Clear standards for recycled material

These are some of the conclusions from NGO ChemSec’s survey and interview study with 26 highly well-known consumer product brands. All brands responded to a survey concerning their current plastic use, as well as their needs, expectations and challenges regarding using more recycled material, to enable the shift to a circular economy for plastics.

Ten of the brands then participated in in-depth interviews on the same topics:, Essity, H&M, IKEA, Inditex , Lego, Mars,  SC Johnson, Tarkett, Unilever and Walgreens Boots Alliance.

A new interview study from NGO ChemSec shows that there is a gap between supply and demand when it comes to recycled materials, causing confusion and bottlenecks. Among other things, suppliers go out of their way using elaborate trade schemes to reach the coveted ”100% recycled” tag, which – it turns out – is not that important to consumer product brands. Far more crucial aspects, according to several major B2C companies, are:

  • Honest communication towards customers
  • Comprehensive information from suppliers
  • Clear standards for recycled material

These are some of the conclusions from NGO ChemSec’s survey and interview study with 26 highly well-known consumer product brands. All brands responded to a survey concerning their current plastic use, as well as their needs, expectations and challenges regarding using more recycled material, to enable the shift to a circular economy for plastics.

Ten of the brands then participated in in-depth interviews on the same topics:, Essity, H&M, IKEA, Inditex , Lego, Mars,  SC Johnson, Tarkett, Unilever and Walgreens Boots Alliance.

Is non-mechanical recycling the answer?
Only about ten percent of all discarded plastics is recycled today, which is of course not nearly enough to achieve a circular plastics economy. Despite ambitions and initiatives to reduce plastics use – replacing the materials with other, more sustainable ones – the “plastic tap” is not expected to be turned off anytime soon. Quite the opposite, which makes raising the recycling rates more important than ever.

Although commercially viable, traditional (mechanical) recycling is afflicted with severe flaws, such as legacy chemicals, quality and functionality issues, as well as the lack of clean and sorted waste streams. The brands cited quality and functionality issues as the main obstacles for using more recycled material in their products.

This opens up for non-mechanical recycling, sometimes referred to as chemical recycling, where the plastic is either dissolved or broken down into smaller building blocks. Harmful additives and other hazardous chemicals can be removed in the process, and a material comparable to virgin plastic can be achieved – at least in theory.

So far, however, non-mechanical recycling technologies are costly, energy-intensive, and often require the addition of a great deal of virgin plastic to work – the very material that needs to be phased out.

The chain of custody models needs to be detangled
Apart from these production issues, there is a wide range of chain of custody models surrounding non-mechanical recycling, including mass balance and book & claim, which enable trade of credits or certificates for recycled material.

This cuts the physical connection between input and output, making it possible for a supplier to sell a material as “100% recycled”, when the actual recycled content could be zero.

This is a major issue for the brands ChemSec has spoken to, who value honest and correct communication towards customers. It turns out, perhaps somewhat surprisingly, that being able to slap a “made from 100% recycled plastic” label on a product is not all that important to brands.

To the brands, a physical connection between input (the discarded plastic waste headed for recycling) and output (the product at least partially made from recycled plastics) is far more important.

A physical connection, along with correct and adequate information from suppliers, as well as clearer standards and guidelines than what is available today, is what brands require to increase the use of recycled material and move us closer to a circular economy for plastics.

More information:
ChemSec plastics Recycling
Source:

ChemSec

Photo: Erema
07.04.2022

EREMA: New R&D centre for innovative recycling technologies

Construction machinery rolls into action again. The ground-breaking ceremony at the EREMA site in Ansfelden on April, 6 signals the start of work on a new R&D centre. Two halls with a total area of 1,550 square metres and a new office building with 50 workplaces will be built. The R&D centre will offer cross-departmental and cross-company test machines and laboratory for research and development of plastics recycling technologies to further advance the circular economy. Completion is scheduled for February 2023.

Plastics recycling is currently evolving very rapidly from a niche to a trend. This is driven by the legislative targets for plastics recycling that the European Union and many countries around the world have enacted, as well as by the European Green Deal, which aims to make Europe the first climate-neutral continent and in which the circular economy plays a very central role.

Construction machinery rolls into action again. The ground-breaking ceremony at the EREMA site in Ansfelden on April, 6 signals the start of work on a new R&D centre. Two halls with a total area of 1,550 square metres and a new office building with 50 workplaces will be built. The R&D centre will offer cross-departmental and cross-company test machines and laboratory for research and development of plastics recycling technologies to further advance the circular economy. Completion is scheduled for February 2023.

Plastics recycling is currently evolving very rapidly from a niche to a trend. This is driven by the legislative targets for plastics recycling that the European Union and many countries around the world have enacted, as well as by the European Green Deal, which aims to make Europe the first climate-neutral continent and in which the circular economy plays a very central role.

However, there is not just one recycling solution for all types of plastic waste, but rather different solutions depending on the type of plastic, the product and the application intended for the recycled plastic. While some plastics processing loops, such as for PET bottles, have already been closed, many other plastic waste streams still require a great deal of R&D in cooperation with everyone involved in the value chain to produce recycled pellets that meet the very highest standards for the production of new products. More space will be available for this in the new centre.

R&D is decentralised at EREMA. In recent years, approximately 5 percent of turnover was reinvested annually in research and development. Employees from different departments handle process engineering challenges, innovations in mechanical engineering and automation technology, and special technologies with a view to further improving the quality of recycled pellets. They also focus on new recycling technologies for waste plastic materials for which there is currently no satisfactory circular economy solution. The decisive factor here is also to exploit the potential of digitalisation. By collecting and analysing machine data, not only can recycling processes and product quality be further improved, but we can also develop our digital service offering for our customers. Such offerings include customer-specific information tools that feature plant and process data, predictive maintenance and online support as well as commissioning via remote access.

For material tests, which are necessary for research and development work, an expanded machine park will be available following completion of the new R&D centre. Here, the recycling process can be evaluated end-to-end, including upstream and downstream processes such as shredding and further processing of the recycled pellets. The material tests are supported by detailed analysis in the professionally equipped laboratory, which will be relocated to the new premises and upgraded where necessary with the very latest lab equipment.

More information:
EREMA plastics recycling
Source:

EREMA Engineering Recycling Maschinen und Anlagen GmbH

Georg Wendelin Foto: privat
Georg Wendelin
05.04.2022

EREMA mourns the passing of company co-founder Georg Wendelin

The EREMA Group mourns the passing of Georg Wendelin, company co-founder, former Managing Partner and long-time Chairman of the Supervisory Board of EREMA Group GmbH, who died on the 29th of March at the age of 84.

In 1983, at a time when plastics recycling was hardly an issue, Georg Wendelin, together with Helmut Bacher and Helmuth Schulz, laid the corner stone for the group of companies that today is a world market leader by founding the company and building the first EREMA plastics recycling machine. With pioneering spirit, a business acumen and his respectful and appreciative management style, Georg Wendelin actively shaped the success of the company, attentively and proudly keeping track of how plastics recycling went from being a niche to a trend and how the EREMA Group became a driving force behind the circular economy. In 2019, he was awarded the Golden Decoration of the Republic of Austria in recognition of his work.

The EREMA Group mourns the passing of Georg Wendelin, company co-founder, former Managing Partner and long-time Chairman of the Supervisory Board of EREMA Group GmbH, who died on the 29th of March at the age of 84.

In 1983, at a time when plastics recycling was hardly an issue, Georg Wendelin, together with Helmut Bacher and Helmuth Schulz, laid the corner stone for the group of companies that today is a world market leader by founding the company and building the first EREMA plastics recycling machine. With pioneering spirit, a business acumen and his respectful and appreciative management style, Georg Wendelin actively shaped the success of the company, attentively and proudly keeping track of how plastics recycling went from being a niche to a trend and how the EREMA Group became a driving force behind the circular economy. In 2019, he was awarded the Golden Decoration of the Republic of Austria in recognition of his work.

"We will greatly miss Georg Wendelin as a personality who was closely associated with us for all these years. Because of his humanity, he was a highly respected figure of leadership on all sides," said Manfred Hackl, CEO of EREMA Group GmbH and himself a long-time companion of Wendelin's.

More information:
EREMA Georg Wendelin
Source:

EREMA Group GmbH

01.04.2022

Carbios presents its 2021 Annual Results

  • 2021 Annual Results: First IFRS consolidated statements integrating the subsidiary Carbiolice
  • Plan to build a first industrial facility with a strong financial support from the French Government and the Grand-Est Region: site selected in France in partnership with Indorama Ventures, world leader in the production recycled PET
  • Successful commissioning of a demonstration facility in September 2021 and confirmation of the validity of the scale-up of Carbios’ enzymatic recycling technology
  • Takeover of Carbiolice and full integration in the consolidated IFRS statements since June 4th, 2021
  • Appointment of Philippe Pouletty as Chairman of the Board of Directors on April 1st, 2022
  • Appointment of Emmanuel Ladent as CEO of the Company on December 1st, 2021
  • Strengthening of Carbios’ financial structure: capital increase of €114 million with French and International investors and €30 million loan from the European Investment Bank (EIB)
  • Group’s cash position of €105 million as of December 31, 2021, which does not include the €30 million EIB loan due to be drawn down in the first half of 2022

Carbios, a pi

  • 2021 Annual Results: First IFRS consolidated statements integrating the subsidiary Carbiolice
  • Plan to build a first industrial facility with a strong financial support from the French Government and the Grand-Est Region: site selected in France in partnership with Indorama Ventures, world leader in the production recycled PET
  • Successful commissioning of a demonstration facility in September 2021 and confirmation of the validity of the scale-up of Carbios’ enzymatic recycling technology
  • Takeover of Carbiolice and full integration in the consolidated IFRS statements since June 4th, 2021
  • Appointment of Philippe Pouletty as Chairman of the Board of Directors on April 1st, 2022
  • Appointment of Emmanuel Ladent as CEO of the Company on December 1st, 2021
  • Strengthening of Carbios’ financial structure: capital increase of €114 million with French and International investors and €30 million loan from the European Investment Bank (EIB)
  • Group’s cash position of €105 million as of December 31, 2021, which does not include the €30 million EIB loan due to be drawn down in the first half of 2022

Carbios, a pioneer in the development of enzymatic solutions dedicated to the end-of-life of plastic, announced its operating and financial results for the year 2021. The financial statements as of December 31, 2021, were approved by the Company’s Board of Directors at their meeting on March 31, 2022.

“In 2021, Carbios achieved several technical and industrial milestones testifying of the soundness and successful execution of our strategy. The excellent results obtained from our demonstration plant confirms the industrial scale-up potential of our biological technology for the recycling of PET plastics and fibers. Together with our Consortium members, we also produced the world’s first food-grade PET sample bottles produced entirely from enzymatically recycled plastics; a world first. In addition, we have strengthened our financial structure by raising a landmark €114 million in May 2021 and we have taken full control of Carbiolice in June. In line with our objectives and with a strong financial support from the French Government and the Grand-Est Region, we will soon enable France to host the world’s first industrial facility dedicated to the biological recycling of plastics. Carbios’ enzymatic process will make it possible to recycle more than 50,000 tons of PET plastic waste per year,” comments Emmanuel Ladent, CEO of Carbios. “Our priority for 2022 is to finalize the terms of our partnership with Indorama Ventures, which will host the world’s first industrial facility operating our biological recycling process at its French production site in Longlaville. This year will also be about optimizing our commercial strategy, while continuing our innovation efforts on the end-of-life of other polymers.”

Click here to for further information.

Source:

Carbios

Photo: Pixabay
30.03.2022

EURATEX comments “Strategy for Sustainable Textile” calling for a realistic implementation

Today, March 30, the European Commission released its long-awaited Strategy for Sustainable Textile, with the ambition to move the sector towards the path of sustainability. EURATEX welcomes the EU ambitions to act on sustainable textiles and investments, in order to change how textiles are made, chosen and recovered, but calls for a smart and realistic implementation. Many European companies have already chosen this path, therefore the strategy should support them in this process, especially considering today’s energy crisis.

The strategy recognises the strategic importance of textiles, which are not only used as apparel or furniture, but applied in cars, medical equipment, agriculture, etc. It acknowledges the European Industry pro-active initiatives to tackle microplastics, to solve challenges of market surveillance and the skills needs. More cooperation is needed for re-use and recycling of textiles and to set up an EU market for secondary raw materials. On this last point, EURATEX ReHubs initiative is developing proposals to size EPR potential, to transform waste into value, and create a new capacity and jobs.

Today, March 30, the European Commission released its long-awaited Strategy for Sustainable Textile, with the ambition to move the sector towards the path of sustainability. EURATEX welcomes the EU ambitions to act on sustainable textiles and investments, in order to change how textiles are made, chosen and recovered, but calls for a smart and realistic implementation. Many European companies have already chosen this path, therefore the strategy should support them in this process, especially considering today’s energy crisis.

The strategy recognises the strategic importance of textiles, which are not only used as apparel or furniture, but applied in cars, medical equipment, agriculture, etc. It acknowledges the European Industry pro-active initiatives to tackle microplastics, to solve challenges of market surveillance and the skills needs. More cooperation is needed for re-use and recycling of textiles and to set up an EU market for secondary raw materials. On this last point, EURATEX ReHubs initiative is developing proposals to size EPR potential, to transform waste into value, and create a new capacity and jobs.

The proposed “transition pathways”, which will translate the strategy into action, will be critical in this respect: how will these sustainability targets be reached, what will the cost for SMEs be, how can companies be supported in that green transition, what about the impact on global competitiveness? These are essential questions to be addressed in the coming months.
The Textile strategy is part of much broader package, including as many as 16 new legislative actions and other policies which will directly impact on textile value chain. In particular the Sustainable Product Initiative Regulation released on March, 30 includes game-changing provisions on Digital Product Passport, Eco-Design, SMEs and Green Public Procurement.  The Regulation has an overwhelming ambition and, to be realistic, it would require a new way of joint working between institutions and business, and which builds on lessons learned on data flow across value chains, interoperability, conformity assessment and effective measures to support SMEs.

If wrongly implemented, such an unprecedented wave may cause a complete collapse of the European textile value chain under the burden of restrictions, requirements, costs and unlevel playing field. On the contrary, the changes ahead can boom the entire textile ecosystem and create a model of successful green and digital transition in manufacturing, which starts in Europe and expands globally.

Already in 2019, EURATEX asked policy makers to work together and remove barriers to circular economy, solve the market surveillance paradox in which laws are made but not checked, and to help create scale economies to make sustainable textiles affordable, hence the norm.

For example, there are 28 billion products circulating per year in EU, which is an impressive task for market surveillance authorities including customs. EURATEX has been stressing non-sufficient market surveillance and it is actively working on solutions for a fair and effective market surveillance of textile products through Reach4Textiles. EURATEX very much welcomes that the European Commission recognizes our work and the need for market surveillance by establishing more harmonised efforts in the EU.

EURATEX also welcomes the establishment of the Digital Product Passport. It has a high potential to improve every step in the textile value chain, from design and manufacturing to recycling and purchasing. At the same time, EURATEX calls the co-legislators to take into account the role of SME’s in this transition and to put forward pragmatic initiatives, supporting SME’s across the EU in a systematic approach.

Alberto Paccanelli, EURATEX President, concludes: EURATEX calls for true cooperation with all policy makers and other stakeholders across the value chains to advise, pressure-test and use this opportunity for a successful transition. Our ambition must be to reconcile sustainability, resilience and competitiveness; we know it can be done”.

Source:

EURATEX

(c) EREMA Group GmbH
17.03.2022

EREMA: Working together with Recycling Company Anviplas

The Spanish recycling company Anviplas has been involved in plastics recycling for more than 30 years, during which time it has built up extensive know-how that now benefits customers throughout Europe, in Africa and in Asia. Their cooperation with EREMA is almost as long. Since 1991, Anviplas has relied on the technology and service provided by the Austrian recycling machine manufacturer.

The Spanish recycling company Anviplas has been involved in plastics recycling for more than 30 years, during which time it has built up extensive know-how that now benefits customers throughout Europe, in Africa and in Asia. Their cooperation with EREMA is almost as long. Since 1991, Anviplas has relied on the technology and service provided by the Austrian recycling machine manufacturer.

Employing 64 people, Anviplas recycles post-industrial and post-consumer plastic waste, especially HD and LD-PE as well as PP, to make recycled pellets in all colour variations. The production capacity is 1,800 tonnes per month. An EREMA type INTAREMA® 1716 TVEplus® recycling machine with screen changer is in operation at the site in Navarcles (Barcelona) for processing the PP material stream. This patented extruder system was developed for handling difficult-to-process materials, such as heavily printed films as well as very moist waste. This machine is characterised by its optimised 3-stage degassing system; firstly by preheating and predrying the material in the preconditioning unit, secondly because the screw design allows reverse degassing, and thirdly in the degassing zone of the extruder.

Anviplas customers manufacture a huge bandwidth of products made using their recycled pellets. They range from various film products, such as stretch, shrink, mulch and silage films, to irrigation, corrugated and high-pressure pipes, as well as containers such as tubs, bottles, barrels and crates.

In February 2022 the Repeats Group, a pan-European platform for LDPE recycling, and Anviplas announced, that Repeats has made an investment in the Spanish recycling company. For Repeats this investment in Anviplas represents an important step in building a pan-European plastics recycling platform.

More information:
EREMA Recycling plastics Anviplas
Source:

EREMA Group GmbH

16.03.2022

Sarah Borghi's Green Collection is back with a range of sustainable tights and stockings

For its 2021 Green Collection, the Italian luxury hosiery brand Sarah Borghi presents a broadened product offer in terms of colors and categories, meeting the needs of a stylish, yet sustainable consumer. By mixing fashion, quality, innovation and research, the tights and stockings powerhouse continues its development in the journey towards a conscious future.

A decisive step has been added to the brand’s history thanks to the publication of the Integrated Report by Gizeta Calze. Sarah Borghi is one of the first Italian companies in the hosiery sector to include sustainability throughout its business model. A commitment of responsibility and transparency on a path that has been carried on for years and that, today more than ever, becomes of the utmost importance, as stated by Luca Marzocchi, CEO of Gizeta Calze. The Integrated Report provides a complete view of the business strategy, operating model and governance, which combines financial information with sustainability insights, conceived as complementary to other strategies and, indeed, essential for increasing business value.

For its 2021 Green Collection, the Italian luxury hosiery brand Sarah Borghi presents a broadened product offer in terms of colors and categories, meeting the needs of a stylish, yet sustainable consumer. By mixing fashion, quality, innovation and research, the tights and stockings powerhouse continues its development in the journey towards a conscious future.

A decisive step has been added to the brand’s history thanks to the publication of the Integrated Report by Gizeta Calze. Sarah Borghi is one of the first Italian companies in the hosiery sector to include sustainability throughout its business model. A commitment of responsibility and transparency on a path that has been carried on for years and that, today more than ever, becomes of the utmost importance, as stated by Luca Marzocchi, CEO of Gizeta Calze. The Integrated Report provides a complete view of the business strategy, operating model and governance, which combines financial information with sustainability insights, conceived as complementary to other strategies and, indeed, essential for increasing business value.

The collection presents a range of versatile, colorful products combined with extra-luxury comfort and designed for every type of woman: from seductive tights to everyday socks, together with knee- highs, up to athleisure with leggings.
 
The collection features two new generation materials. One is Amni Soul Eco®, a biodegradable in anaerobic conditions polyamide 6.6 yarn that degrades in around 5 years* after disposing of in landfill, developed by SOLVAY and produced and distributed by FULGAR. The other is ROICA™ V550 by leading fiber manufacturer Asahi Kasei, a premium sustainable stretch yarn boasting the Gold Level Material Health Certificate by Cradle-to-Cradle Product Innovation Institute** as it has been evaluated for impact on human and environmental health. Moreover, it smartly breaks down without releasing harmful substances in the environment according to Hohenstein Environment Compatibility Certification. Key elements that makes ROICA™ V550 a precious choice when it comes to Circular Economy material approach.


*Reference System: ASTM D5511 - Standard Test Method for the Determination of Anaerobic Biodegradation of Plastics Under High-solids Anaerobic Digestion Conditions
** The Cradle-to-Cradle Product Innovation Institute, a non -profit organization, administer the Cradle-to-Cradle Certified™ Product Standard. It was created to bring about a new industrial revolution that turns the making of things into a positive force of society, economy and the planet. The Cradle-to-Cradle Certified Product Standard™ provides designers and manufacturers with criteria and requirements for continually improving what products are made of and how they are made aiming to achieve a circular economy approach.

Source:

ROICA™ / Sarah Borghi / GB Network

(c) nova-Institut GmbH
25.02.2022

Winner of the Cellulose Fibre Innovation of the Year

The annual highlight of the industry is the International Conference on Cellulose Fibres in Cologne, where the latest innovations were showcased: new cellulose fibre technologies for various feedstocks and a wide range of hygiene and textile products as well as alternatives to plastics and carbon fibre for lightweight constructions.

This year, for the first time, there were 230 participants from 27 countries. About 60 were able to attend on site – with strict Corona safety measures – while the others were able to attend online and participate in questions and discussions.

The conference gave deep insights into the promising future of cellulose fibres, which fit perfectly into the current trends of circular economy, recycling and sustainable carbon cycles.

The annual highlight of the industry is the International Conference on Cellulose Fibres in Cologne, where the latest innovations were showcased: new cellulose fibre technologies for various feedstocks and a wide range of hygiene and textile products as well as alternatives to plastics and carbon fibre for lightweight constructions.

This year, for the first time, there were 230 participants from 27 countries. About 60 were able to attend on site – with strict Corona safety measures – while the others were able to attend online and participate in questions and discussions.

The conference gave deep insights into the promising future of cellulose fibres, which fit perfectly into the current trends of circular economy, recycling and sustainable carbon cycles.

An important focus at the conference was alternative sources of cellulose. The increasing demand for cellulose fibres cannot be met in the long run with wood and used textiles alone. At the conference, a variety of agricultural by-products and biogenic waste were presented in presentations and panel discussions, such as orange and banana peels, grain and hemp straw. Much of this is high-volume and has not been put to high-value use so far. Exciting opportunities for the future cellulose fibre industry.

Innovation Award
Live at the conference, host nova-Institute and award sponsor GIG Karasek GmbH granted the “Cellulose Fibre Innovation of the Year” award to one of six highly interesting products.

  • First Winner: Carbon Fibres from Wood – German Institutes of Textile and Fiber Research Denkendorf (Germany)
  • Second Winner: Fibers365, Truly Carbon-Negative Virgin Fibres from Straw - Fibers365 (Germany)
  • Third Winner: Sustainable Menstruation Panties: Application-driven Fibre Functionalisation – Kelheim Fibres (Germany)
(c) ZAMG/Niedermoser
Scientists ascending to the research station in the Hohe Tauern National Park
01.02.2022

Plastic snowfall in the Alps - New Empa Study about nanoplastic in the environment

In a new study, Empa researcher Dominik Brunner, together with colleagues from Utrecht University and the Austrian Central Institute for Meteorology and Geophysics, is investigating how much plastic is trickling down on us from the atmosphere. According to the study, some nanoplastics travel over 2000 kilometers through the air. According to the figures from the measurements about 43 trillion miniature plastic particles land in Switzerland every year. Researchers still disagree on the exact number. But according to estimates from the study, it could be as much as 3,000 tonnes of nanoplastics that cover Switzerland every year, from the remote Alps to the urban lowlands. These estimates are very high compared to other studies, and more research is needed to verify these numbers

The study is uncharted scientific territory because the spread of nanoplastics through the air is still largely unexplored.

In a new study, Empa researcher Dominik Brunner, together with colleagues from Utrecht University and the Austrian Central Institute for Meteorology and Geophysics, is investigating how much plastic is trickling down on us from the atmosphere. According to the study, some nanoplastics travel over 2000 kilometers through the air. According to the figures from the measurements about 43 trillion miniature plastic particles land in Switzerland every year. Researchers still disagree on the exact number. But according to estimates from the study, it could be as much as 3,000 tonnes of nanoplastics that cover Switzerland every year, from the remote Alps to the urban lowlands. These estimates are very high compared to other studies, and more research is needed to verify these numbers

The study is uncharted scientific territory because the spread of nanoplastics through the air is still largely unexplored.

The scientists studied a small area at an altitude of 3106 meters at the top of the mountain "Hoher Sonnenblick" in the "Hohe Tauern" National Park in Austria.
Every day, and in all weather conditions, scientists removed a part of the top layer of snow around a marker at 8 AM and carefully stored it. Contamination of the samples by nanoplastics in the air or on the scientists' clothes was a particular challenge. In the laboratory, the researchers sometimes had to remain motionless when a colleague handled an open sample.

The origin of the tiny particles was traced with the help of European wind and weather data. The researchers could show that the greatest emission of nanoplastics into the atmosphere occurs in densely populated, urban areas. About 30% of the nanoplastic particles measured on the mountain top originate from a radius of 200 kilometers, mainly from cities. However, plastics from the world's oceans apparently also get into the air via the spray of the waves. Around 10% of the particles measured in the study were blown onto the mountain by wind and weather over 2000 kilometers – some of them from the Atlantic.

It is estimated that more than 8300 million tonnes of plastic have been produced worldwide to date, about 60% of which is now waste. This waste erodes through weathering effects and mechanical abrasion from macro- to micro- and nanoparticles. But discarded plastic is far from the only source. Everyday use of plastic products such as packaging and clothing releases nanoplastics. Particles in this size range are so light that their movement in the air can best be compared to gases.

Besides plastics, there are all kinds of other tiny particles. From Sahara sand to brake pads, the world is buzzing through the air as abrasion. It is as yet unclear whether this kind of air pollution poses a potential health threat to humans. Nanoparticles, unlike microparticles, do not just end up in the stomach. They are sucked deep into the lungs through respiration, where their size may allow them to cross the cell-blood barrier and enter the human bloodstream. Whether this is harmful or even dangerous, however, remains to be researched.

Source:

Empa, Noé Waldmann

12.01.2022

Cellulose fibres strengthen networks: Industry meets in Cologne, Germany, and online

Strict protective measures will make the industry meeting possible at the International Conference on Cellulose Fibres in Cologne on February 2 and 3, 2022. The latest innovations will be shocased: from hygiene and textiles to non-wovens and carbon fibre alternatives to lightweight construction applications. Online participation is also possible.

Cellulose fibres show an increasingly expanding wide range of applications, while at the same time markets are driven by technological developments and political framework conditions, especially bans and restrictions on plastics and increasing sustainability requirements. The conference provides rich information on opportunities for cellulose fibres through policy assessment, a session on sustainability, recycling and alternative feedstocks as well as latest development in pulp, cellulose fibres and yarns. This includes application such as non-wovens, packaging and composites.

Strict protective measures will make the industry meeting possible at the International Conference on Cellulose Fibres in Cologne on February 2 and 3, 2022. The latest innovations will be shocased: from hygiene and textiles to non-wovens and carbon fibre alternatives to lightweight construction applications. Online participation is also possible.

Cellulose fibres show an increasingly expanding wide range of applications, while at the same time markets are driven by technological developments and political framework conditions, especially bans and restrictions on plastics and increasing sustainability requirements. The conference provides rich information on opportunities for cellulose fibres through policy assessment, a session on sustainability, recycling and alternative feedstocks as well as latest development in pulp, cellulose fibres and yarns. This includes application such as non-wovens, packaging and composites.

Live at the conference, host nova-Institute and sponsor GIG Karasek GmbH will grand the “Cellulose Fibre Innovation of the Year” award to one of six highly interesting products, ranging from cellulose made of orange and wood pulp to a novel technology for cellulose fibre production. The presentations, election of the winner by the conference audience and the award ceremony will take place on the first day of the conference.

The conference sessions reflect the current topics of industry and research. “Strategies and Market Trends” provides an overview of the rapid development of cellulose fibres and their technological progress across the fibre market. An analysis of the key cost components of these fibres to benchmark against current cost levels will highlight future opportunities and challenges for novel textile fibres. The session will conclude with an overview of the industry's recent strategies to defossilize the fibre market.

The session “New Opportunities for Cellulose Fibres in Replacing Plastics”, focusses on questions such as: “What impact does the ban on plastics in single-use products have on the industry?” and “What are the latest regulatory issues and policy opportunities for cellulose fibres?”. This part of the conference presents new opportunities for the replacement of fossil-based insulating materials with cellulose-based technologies suitable for use in a variety of applications, from aerospace to mobility and construction.
Institutefor Ecology and Innovation

“Sustainability and Circular Economy” highlights crucial issues with regard to the overall goal of keeping the environmental impact of cellulose fibres low. A core theme of the session is the responsible use of wood and forests. With this objective, the five speakers discuss the importance of circular concepts for cellulose feedstocks. Exciting insights into the important “Hot Button Report” are offered by Canopy. The “Hot Button” report enables the producers of cellulose fibres to better understand the impact their raw materials have on forests and the climate development worldwide.

The full conference programme is available at www.cellulose-fibres.eu/program.

Source:

nova-Institut GmbH

04.01.2022

Cellulose Fibres: New Technologies for Pulp, Fibres and Yarns

  • Session "New Technologies for Pulp, Fibres and Yarns"

Cellulose fibres are a true material miracle as they offer a steadily expanding, broad range of applications. Meanwhile markets are driven by technological developments and policy frameworks, especially bans and restrictions on plastics, as well as an increasing number of sustainability requirements. The  presentations will provide valuable information on the various use-opportunities for cellulosic fibres through a policy overview, a special session on sustainability, recycling and alternative feedstocks, as well as the latest developments in pulp cellulosic fibres and yarns. In addition, examples of non-wovens,  packaging and composites will offer a look beyond the horizon of conventional application fields.

  • Session "New Technologies for Pulp, Fibres and Yarns"

Cellulose fibres are a true material miracle as they offer a steadily expanding, broad range of applications. Meanwhile markets are driven by technological developments and policy frameworks, especially bans and restrictions on plastics, as well as an increasing number of sustainability requirements. The  presentations will provide valuable information on the various use-opportunities for cellulosic fibres through a policy overview, a special session on sustainability, recycling and alternative feedstocks, as well as the latest developments in pulp cellulosic fibres and yarns. In addition, examples of non-wovens,  packaging and composites will offer a look beyond the horizon of conventional application fields.

The extensive fifth conference session, “New Technologies for Pulp, Fibres and Yarns”, includes the participation of eight speakers and promises the reveal of various innovations and new approaches. These address the processing of pulp, fibres and yarn, with the aim of realizing most sustainable and efficient solutions. The broad spectrum of topics ranges from processing cellulose with ionic liquids, material farming and chemical modification of pulp to functionalised fibres for feel-good textiles.

Speakers of the Session "New Technologies for Pulp, Fibres and Yarns"

  • Antje Ota - Deutsche Institute für Textil- und Faserforschung (DITF) (DE): The Versatility of the HighPerCell® Technology for Cellulose Filament
  • Carlo Centonze - HEIQ (CH): HeiQ AeoniQ – Cellulose Yarn Focussed on Climate and Circularity
  • Manuel Steiner - LIST Technology AG (CH): Cellulose Dissolving Technology Platform
  • Dominik Mayer - Kelheim Fibres (DE): Functionalized Viscose Fibres for Wellbeing Textiles: How Infrared Celliant® Viscose supports a Healthy and Sustainable Lifestyle
  • Michael Sturm - TITK (DE): Method for the Evaluation of the dissolution Power and dissolution Quality of Cellulosic Raw Materials dissolved in New Ionic Liquids
  • Kaoutar Aghmih - Hassan II University (MA): Rheology and Dissolution of Cellulose in Ionic Liquid Solutions
  • Ofir-Aharon Kuperman - Weizmann Institute of Science (IL): Material Farming and Biological Fabrication of Cellulose Fibers with Tailored Properties
  • Taina Kamppuri - VTT Technical Research Center of Finnland (FI): Chemically Modified Kraft Pulps to Improve the Sustainability of Regenerated Fibres
CCF2022 New Opportunities for Cellulose Fibres in Replacing Plastics
Session "Recycling and Other Alternative Feedstocks"
29.12.2021

New Opportunities for Cellulose Fibres in Replacing Plastics

  • Session "Recycling and Other Alternative Feedstocks"

Cellulose fibres are a true material miracle as they offer a steadily expanding, broad range of applications. Meanwhile markets are driven by technological developments and policy frameworks, especially bans and restrictions on plastics, as well as an increasing number of sustainability requirements. The  presentations will provide valuable information on the various use-opportunities for cellulosic fibres through a policy overview, a special session on sustainability, recycling and alternative feedstocks, as well as the latest developments in pulp, cellulosic fibres and yarns. In addition, examples of non-wovens,  packaging and composites will offer a look beyond the horizon of conventional application fields.

  • Session "Recycling and Other Alternative Feedstocks"

Cellulose fibres are a true material miracle as they offer a steadily expanding, broad range of applications. Meanwhile markets are driven by technological developments and policy frameworks, especially bans and restrictions on plastics, as well as an increasing number of sustainability requirements. The  presentations will provide valuable information on the various use-opportunities for cellulosic fibres through a policy overview, a special session on sustainability, recycling and alternative feedstocks, as well as the latest developments in pulp, cellulosic fibres and yarns. In addition, examples of non-wovens,  packaging and composites will offer a look beyond the horizon of conventional application fields.

The fourth session, "Recycling and other alternative raw materials", will cover topics ranging from textile recycling - both cotton and regenerated cellulose fibres - to the use of hemp shives as raw material. Self-initiated cooperation and waste management pave the way to a fully closed European material loop where textile waste is collected, recycled and reprocessed into new raw materials.

The speakers will demonstrate the importance of cooperation in recycling fabrics already in circulation, perfectly following the topics and discussions of the previous conference day.

  • Heikki Hassi - SciTech-Service (FI):  Textile Recycling and MMCFs; Systemic Challenges, Market Opportunities and Advancing Technologies
  • Valerie Langer - Canopy (CA): The Perfect Storm – A Five Year Feedstock Shift Forecast
  • Helena Claesson - Södra (SE): Two is better than one – Lenzing and Södra together Face the Challenge of Recycling of Textiles
  • Marina Crnoja-Cosic - Kelheim Fibres (DE) and Harald Cavalli-Björkman - re:newcell (SE): Sustainable Cellulosic Fibres from Recycled Raw Materials – A Solution for Europe
  • Frank Meister - Thüringisches Institut für Textil- und Kunststoff-Forschung (DE): Lyohemp Fibres Made of Dissolving Pulp Based on Hemp Shives
  • Miguel Sanchis-Sebastiá - ShareTex (SE): Expanding Textile Recycling Beyond Cotton: Innovations to Recycle Regenerated Cellulose Fibers
(c) EREMA GmbH
15.12.2021

EREMA: Large-scale recycling Plants for production capacity up to 40,000 tonnes per year

As the demand for recycled plastics grows, so does the size of the machines. This applies to the processing of polyolefins as well as to PET recycling. With its unique dimensions and production capacity, this new size of plant features a screw diameter of 280 mm, implemented for the first time in a VACUREMA® Basic 2628 T large-scale project for producing rPET pellets. EREMA has just shipped the plant to a customer in Brazil.

As the demand for recycled plastics grows, so does the size of the machines. This applies to the processing of polyolefins as well as to PET recycling. With its unique dimensions and production capacity, this new size of plant features a screw diameter of 280 mm, implemented for the first time in a VACUREMA® Basic 2628 T large-scale project for producing rPET pellets. EREMA has just shipped the plant to a customer in Brazil.

Up to 40,000 tonnes per year of rPET meeting the highest quality standards can now be produced. "For this purpose, we installed a screw with a length of ten meters, a diameter of 280 millimetres and a weight of 3.5 tonnes, which is the largest ever used in one of our recycling machines," explains Managing Director Michael Heitzinger. The screw was manufactured by 3S, a subsidiary of EREMA GmbH. No less impressive is the reactor of this recycling system, which, with a height of around 10 metres, is also unique and almost reaches the roof of the new production hall. 500 tonnes of input material were recycled during the test phase, which was subject to strict quality control. "The entire project was a great team effort," Heitzinger said, thanking everyone involved.

EREMA as a partner for large-scale projects
Just four years ago, the largest extrusion line supplied by EREMA was designed for a throughput of 15,000 tonnes per year. This size of plant was ordered by customers once or twice a year. In the meantime, machines like this leave the production site in Ansfelden every month. As early as 2020, EREMA proved to be a pioneer and reliable partner for implementing unique large-scale projects. That was when the food and beverage packaging manufacturer Envases Universales Mexico commissioned two VACUREMA® Basic 2625 T machines, each with a screw diameter of 250 mm and a capacity of 30,000 tonnes per year.

Source:

EREMA GmbH

DNFI: Microplastic pollution is a global challenge Photo: pixabay
10.12.2021

DNFI: Microplastic pollution is a global challenge

Microplastic pollution is a global challenge across many industries and sectors – one of critical importance being textiles.

A 2021 study by the California Ocean Science Trust and a group of interdisciplinary scientists acknowledges that microfibres from textiles are among the most common microplastic materials found in the marine environment. Every time synthetic clothes are manufactured, worn, washed, or disposed of, they release microplastics into terrestrial and marine environments, including human food chains. Synthetic fibres represent over two-thirds (69%) of all materials used in textiles, a proportion that is expected to rise to 73% by 2030. The production of synthetic fibres has fuelled a 40-year trend of increased per capita clothing consumption.

Global textile consumption has become:

Microplastic pollution is a global challenge across many industries and sectors – one of critical importance being textiles.

A 2021 study by the California Ocean Science Trust and a group of interdisciplinary scientists acknowledges that microfibres from textiles are among the most common microplastic materials found in the marine environment. Every time synthetic clothes are manufactured, worn, washed, or disposed of, they release microplastics into terrestrial and marine environments, including human food chains. Synthetic fibres represent over two-thirds (69%) of all materials used in textiles, a proportion that is expected to rise to 73% by 2030. The production of synthetic fibres has fuelled a 40-year trend of increased per capita clothing consumption.

Global textile consumption has become:

  • more reliant on non-renewable resources,
  • less biodegradable, and
  • increasingly prone to releasing microplastics.

The increased consumption is also discretionary, driven by consumer desire and remains unchecked. Thus, the long-term trend in the textile industry parallels the intentional addition of microplastics to products such as cosmetics. The contrast is that the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) has recommended such intentional additions be restricted, whereas the over-consumption of synthetic fibres continues unchecked. One way for the EU to account for and mitigate microplastic pollution is through an EU-backed methodology measuring and reporting microplastic emissions, so that consumers and procurement officers have the information needed to minimise microplastic pollution resulting from their purchasing decisions.

There is a critical opportunity to address microplastic pollution in the fashion textile industry through the EU Product Environmental Footprint (PEF) methodology. To meet the environmental objectives of the Circular Economy Action Plan, the EU is proposing that companies substantiate their products’ environmental credentials using this harmonised methodology. However, microplastic pollution is not accounted for in the PEF methodology. This omission has the effect of assigning a zero score to microplastic pollution and would undermine the efforts of the European Green Deal, which aim “to address the unintentional release of microplastics in the environment.”

The incorporation of microplastic pollution as an indicator would increase the legitimacy of the PEF method as well as better inform consumer purchasing decisions, especially as the European Green Deal seeks to “further develop and harmonise methods for measuring unintentionally released microplastics, especially from tyres and textiles, and delivering harmonised data on microplastics concentrations in seawater.”

Whilst we continue to learn about the damage of microplastics and there is new knowledge emerging on the toxic impacts along the food chain, there is sufficient information on the rate of microplastic leakage into the environment to implement a basic, inventory level indicator in the PEF now. This is consistent with the recommendations of a review of microplastic pollution originating from the life cycle of apparel and home textiles. There are precedents in PEF for basic level (e.g., ‘resource use, fossils’) and largely untested (e.g. land occupation and toxicity indicators) indicators, and therefore an opportunity for the EU to promote research and development in the measurement and modelling of microplastic pollution by including such emissions in the PEF methodology. For such an indicator, the long and complex supply chains of the apparel and footwear industry would be a test case with high-impact and a global reach.

Source:

DNFI / IWTO – 2021

New Opportunities for Cellulose Fibres in Replacing Plastics (c) nova-Institut
Nicolas Hark - nova-Institut (DE)
08.12.2021

New Opportunities for Cellulose Fibres in Replacing Plastics

  • Second Session of the International Conference on Cellulose Fibres 2022

Cellulose fibers are a true material miracle as they offer a steadily expanding, broad range of applications. Meanwhile markets are driven by technological developments and policy frameworks, especially bans and restrictions on plastics, as well as an increasing number of sustainability requirements. The  presentations will provide valuable information on the various use-opportunities for cellulosic fibers through a policy overview, a special session on sustainability, recycling and alternative feedstocks, as well as the latest developments in pulp, cellulosic fibers and yarns. In addition, examples of non-wovens, packaging and composites will offer a look beyond the horizon of conventional application fields.

  • Second Session of the International Conference on Cellulose Fibres 2022

Cellulose fibers are a true material miracle as they offer a steadily expanding, broad range of applications. Meanwhile markets are driven by technological developments and policy frameworks, especially bans and restrictions on plastics, as well as an increasing number of sustainability requirements. The  presentations will provide valuable information on the various use-opportunities for cellulosic fibers through a policy overview, a special session on sustainability, recycling and alternative feedstocks, as well as the latest developments in pulp, cellulosic fibers and yarns. In addition, examples of non-wovens, packaging and composites will offer a look beyond the horizon of conventional application fields.

The second session of the conference: "New Opportunities for Cellulose Fibres in Replacing Plastics", will focus on questions such as: "What is the impact of the ban on plastics on single-use products?" and "What are the latest regulatory issues and policy opportunities for cellulose fibres?".  This section presents new opportunities for replacing fossil-based insulating materials with cellulose-based technologies that can be used for a variety of applications, from aerospace to mobility, as well as in construction. For the program just click here.

Speakers of the Session "New Opportunities for Cellulose Fibres in Replacing Plastics":

  • Nicolas Hark - nova-Institut (DE): Opportunities in Policy for Cellulose Fibres
  • Paula Martirez - Stora Enso (SE): Last years Winner Papira® – an Eco-revolution in Foam Packaging
  • Stefanie Schlager - Lenzing (AT): LENZING™ Fibres for Sustainable Single use Products
  • Sascha Schriever - Institut für Textiltechnik der RWTH Aachen University (DE): Cellulose Aerogel Non-wovens – Sustainable Insulators of Tomorrow