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10.11.2022

adidas with robust growth in the third quarter

  • Currency-neutral sales up 4%, reflecting continued double-digit growth outside Greater China
  • Gross margin down 1.0pp to 49.1% as price increases were more than offset by increased supply chain costs, higher discounting, and an unfavorable market mix
  • Operating profit of € 564 million reflecting an operating margin of 8.8%
  • Net income from continuing operations of € 66 million negatively impacted by several one-off costs totaling almost € 300 million as well as extraordinary tax effects in Q3

“The market environment shifted at the beginning of September as consumer demand in Western markets slowed and traffic trends in Greater China further deteriorated. As a result, we saw a significant inventory buildup across the industry, leading to higher promotional activity during the remainder of the year which will increasingly weigh on our earnings,” said adidas CFO Harm Ohlmeyer. “We are encouraged by the enthusiasm for the upcoming FIFA World Cup which is already noticeable in our Football revenue growth. And in North America we are gearing up for an exciting upcoming basketball launch.”

  • Currency-neutral sales up 4%, reflecting continued double-digit growth outside Greater China
  • Gross margin down 1.0pp to 49.1% as price increases were more than offset by increased supply chain costs, higher discounting, and an unfavorable market mix
  • Operating profit of € 564 million reflecting an operating margin of 8.8%
  • Net income from continuing operations of € 66 million negatively impacted by several one-off costs totaling almost € 300 million as well as extraordinary tax effects in Q3

“The market environment shifted at the beginning of September as consumer demand in Western markets slowed and traffic trends in Greater China further deteriorated. As a result, we saw a significant inventory buildup across the industry, leading to higher promotional activity during the remainder of the year which will increasingly weigh on our earnings,” said adidas CFO Harm Ohlmeyer. “We are encouraged by the enthusiasm for the upcoming FIFA World Cup which is already noticeable in our Football revenue growth. And in North America we are gearing up for an exciting upcoming basketball launch.”

In the third quarter, adidas’ currency-neutral revenues increased 4%. While the company experienced high-single-digit top-line growth during the first two months of the period, deteriorating traffic trends in Greater China as well as slowing consumer demand in major Western markets weighed on the revenue development in September. In addition, the company’s decision to suspend its own operations in Russia at the end of Q1 significantly reduced revenues by more than € 100 million during the third quarter, particularly impacting the company’s direct-to-consumer (DTC) business. In euro terms, the company’s revenues grew 11% to € 6.408 billion in the third quarter (2021: € 5.752 billion).

From a category perspective, revenue growth was the highest in adidas’ strategic growth categories Football and Running, both growing at strong double-digit rates. In Football, the jersey launches ahead of the FIFA World Cup 2022 fueled consumer excitement prior to the tournament. Revenues in Running were driven by the latest iterations of adidas’ successful running franchises, including Adizero and Supernova, which both grew more than 50% during the quarter. On the Lifestyle side, the further scaling of the successful Forum and Ozweego franchises led to strong double-digit growth for both product families. At the same time, additional highly limited drops as part of the Gucci and Balenciaga partnerships continued to spark excitement around the adidas brand.   

From a regional perspective, revenue growth was driven by the company’s Western markets and APAC, which combined continued to grow at a double-digit rate (+12%). In EMEA, revenues grew 7% despite the loss of revenue in Russia/CIS of more than € 100 million. Revenues in North America increased 8% during the quarter driven by a double-digit increase in the company’s DTC channel. In APAC and Latin America, revenue growth accelerated compared to Q2, reaching 15% and 51% respectively, year-on-year. In contrast, the company’s top-line development in Greater China continues to be severely impacted by the challenging market environment, mainly related to the ongoing covid-19-related restrictions. While the company’s own retail revenues in Greater China increased 7% in the third quarter reflecting a robust sell-out, the significant product takebacks reduced the company’s sell-in and resulted in a revenue decline of 27% for the market as a whole during the three-month period.  

Strong bottom-line improvement in 2023  
In 2023, the company expects the non-recurrence of the one-off costs of around € 500 million occurred in 2022 to have a positive impact on the net income development in the same magnitude. In addition, in light of the challenging market environment, adidas established a business improvement program to safeguard the company’s profitability in 2023. As part of this program the company has launched several initiatives to mitigate the significant cost increases resulting from the inflationary pressure across the company’s value chain as well as unfavorable currency movements. In total, the program, which will result in one-off costs of around € 50 million in the fourth quarter of 2022, is expected to compensate cost headwinds of up to € 500 million in 2023. In addition, it is expected to deliver a positive profit contribution of around € 200 million next year. 

More information:
adidas outlook
Source:

adidas AG

04.11.2022

Lenzing responds with savings program to earnings development

The Lenzing Group was increasingly affected by the extreme developments in global energy and raw material markets in the first three quarters of 2022, in line with the impact on the whole of manufacturing industry. The market environment deteriorated sharply, especially during the course of the third quarter, and the worsening consumer climate placed additional pressure on Lenzing’s business performance.

The Lenzing Group was increasingly affected by the extreme developments in global energy and raw material markets in the first three quarters of 2022, in line with the impact on the whole of manufacturing industry. The market environment deteriorated sharply, especially during the course of the third quarter, and the worsening consumer climate placed additional pressure on Lenzing’s business performance.

  • Revenue in the first three quarters up 24 percent – significant deterioration in market environment impacts earnings performance
  • 2022 earnings in the range of current market expectations
  • Reorganization and cost reduction program of EUR 70 mn launched
  • Supervisory Board appoints new Chief Financial Officer – Nico Reiner succeeds Thomas Obendrauf as of January 1, 2023 (see here)

Outlook
The war in Ukraine, China’s zero-Covid policy and the sharp rise in inflation have had a significant impact on the global economy. In July, the International Monetary Fund downgraded its growth expectations for the current calendar year to 3.2 percent. This deterioration in the market environment is also increasingly affecting the consumer climate as well as sentiment in industries relevant for Lenzing. As a consequence, business prospects worsened significantly in the third quarter.

The Lenzing Interim Report 01-09/2022 is available on the company website.

Source:

Lenzing AG

20.10.2022

adidas reports preliminary Q3 results and reduces its full year guidance

adidas announces preliminary results for the third quarter and adjusted its full year 2022 guidance. The company’s new outlook takes into account a further deterioration of traffic trends in Greater China as well as a significant inventory build-up as a result of lower consumer demand in major Western markets since the beginning of September, which is expected to lead to higher promotional activity during the remainder of the year. The new outlook also reflects several one-off costs impacting the company’s bottom-line results in both the third and fourth quarter of the year.

adidas announces preliminary results for the third quarter and adjusted its full year 2022 guidance. The company’s new outlook takes into account a further deterioration of traffic trends in Greater China as well as a significant inventory build-up as a result of lower consumer demand in major Western markets since the beginning of September, which is expected to lead to higher promotional activity during the remainder of the year. The new outlook also reflects several one-off costs impacting the company’s bottom-line results in both the third and fourth quarter of the year.

Based on preliminary numbers, adidas’ currency-neutral revenues grew 4% during the third quarter. Currency-neutral sales in Greater China declined at a strong double-digit rate reflecting the continued widespread covid-19-related restrictions as well as significant inventory takebacks. Excluding Greater China, currency-neutral revenues in the company’s other markets combined continued to grow at a double-digit rate during the quarter. In euro terms, the company’s sales increased 11% to € 6.408 billion in Q3. The gross margin declined 1.0 percentage points to a level of 49.1% and operating margin reached 8.8% during the third quarter (2021: 11.7%). Net income from continuing operations was € 179 million in Q3 (2021: € 479 million). The bottom-line development during the quarter reflects several one-off costs totaling almost € 300 million on the net income level. The majority of these expenses reflect the company’s decision to initiate the wind-down of its business operations in Russia. In addition, non-recurring costs related to accelerated cash pooling in high inflationary countries, a recently settled legal dispute as well as higher provisions for customs-related risks also had an adverse effect on the company’s gross profit, operating overheads as well as financial and tax expenses in the quarter.

As a result of the deteriorating traffic trend in Greater China, higher clearance activity to reduce elevated inventory levels (up 63% on a currency-neutral basis at the end of Q3) as well as total one-off costs of around € 500 million on the net income level in 2022, the company reduced its full year guidance. adidas now expects currency-neutral revenues for the total company to grow at a mid-single-digit rate in 2022 (previously: mid- to high-single-digit rate), reflecting double-digit revenue growth during the fourth quarter. This growth will be driven by adidas’ strong product pipeline, support from the FIFA World Cup 2022 as well as easier prior year comparables. The company’s gross margin is now expected to be around 47.5% in 2022 (previously: around 49.0%). Consequently, the company’s operating margin is now forecasted to be around 4.0% in 2022 (previously: around 7.0%). Net income from continuing operations is expected to reach a level of around € 500 million (previously: around € 1.3 billion).

In 2023, the company expects the non-recurrence of the one-off costs of around € 500 million occurred in 2022 to have a positive impact on the net income development in the same order of magnitude. In addition, in light of the challenging market environment adidas established a business improvement program to safeguard the company’s profitability in 2023. As part of this program the company has launched several initiatives aimed at mitigating the significant cost increases resulting from the inflationary pressure across the company’s value chain as well as unfavorable currency movements. In total, the program, which will result in one-off costs of around € 50 million in the fourth quarter of 2022, is expected to compensate cost headwinds of up to € 500 million in 2023. In addition, it is expected to deliver a positive profit contribution of around € 200 million next year.

More information:
adidas guidance Covid-19
Source:

adidas AG

20.10.2022

Akzo Nobel N.V. publishes results for Q3 2022

Highlights Grow & Deliver (compared with Q3 2021)

  • Revenue up 19% and 14% higher in constant currencies1, pricing up 13%
  • ROS2 at 6.4% (2021: 10.0%), resulting from lower volumes and higher raw material and freight costs, as well as inflation on operating expenses
  • Adjusted EBITDA at €283 million (2021: €325 million)
  • Q4 2022 adjusted operating income expected below €150 million

Highlights Q3 2022 (compared with Q3 2021)

Highlights Grow & Deliver (compared with Q3 2021)

  • Revenue up 19% and 14% higher in constant currencies1, pricing up 13%
  • ROS2 at 6.4% (2021: 10.0%), resulting from lower volumes and higher raw material and freight costs, as well as inflation on operating expenses
  • Adjusted EBITDA at €283 million (2021: €325 million)
  • Q4 2022 adjusted operating income expected below €150 million

Highlights Q3 2022 (compared with Q3 2021)

  • Pricing up 13%, offsetting the increase of raw material and other variable costs. Volumes 5% lower, mainly due to destocking in the distribution channels in Decorative Paints in Europe and in Performance Coatings, as well as lower market demand in China
  • Operating income at €168 million (2021: €226 million), includes €16 million negative impact from Identified items (2021: €15 million net negative impact) and €17 million negative from the retrospective hyperinflation impact of the first half-year of 2022. OPI margin 5.9% (2021: 9.4%)
  • Adjusted operating income3 at €184 million (2021: €241 million); excluding the retrospective impact of hyperinflation accounting at €201 million
  • Net cash from operating activities decreased to an inflow of €126 million (2021: inflow of €290 million)
  • Net income attributable to shareholders at €84 million (2021: €164 million)
  • EPS from total operations at €0.48 (2021: €0.89); adjusted EPS from continuing operations at €0.57 (2021: €0.93)
  • Interim dividend of €0.44 per share (2021: €0.44 per share)

AkzoNobel CEO, Thierry Vanlancker, commented: “Our €201 million adjusted operating income excluding the retrospective impact of hyperinflation accounting bring our Q3 results in line with the market update issued at the end of September. Sharply increased macro-economic uncertainties negatively impacted consumer confidence. This resulted in destocking across several distribution channels in decorative paints Europe and performance coatings, while the market in China was impacted by the ongoing zero COVID-19 policy. Thanks to the strong commitment of our teams, we continue to offset the impact of raw material and freight cost inflation with pricing. We’ve now delivered cumulative pricing of 22% over the last two years. The macro-economic turbulence is expected to continue well into next year. We’ve therefore decided to suspend our targets for 2023 and will provide further guidance when announcing our full-year 2022 results. In the meantime, we will continue to focus on our margin management and cost reduction initiatives.”

Source:

AkzoNobel

(c) EURATEX
11.10.2022

EURATEX and ATP: 10th European Textile & Apparel Convention in Porto

On 13-14 October, EURATEX in partnership with ATP is organising the 10th European Textile & Apparel Convention in Porto, Portugal; the convention marks also the 24th Textile Industry Forum for Portugal.

The Porto Convention – titled Sustainability meets Competitiveness: How to Square the Circle? – will look at how companies can anticipate the new European regulatory framework, embrace innovation, and develop a business model where sustainability becomes a source of competitiveness and growth. In the current economic, social and political environment, Europe is facing many challenges: increased energy prices, unforeseen inflation and climate change, which add to the day-to-day challenges of running a business. Embracing the European Union’s commitment to a green and digital transformation, the textile industry needs to also move towards a new circular economy where recycling is at the core of the design process supported by digitalisation, innovation and new skills, and creativity. The conference will address explore solutions to turn quality and sustainability into a source of competitiveness.

On 13-14 October, EURATEX in partnership with ATP is organising the 10th European Textile & Apparel Convention in Porto, Portugal; the convention marks also the 24th Textile Industry Forum for Portugal.

The Porto Convention – titled Sustainability meets Competitiveness: How to Square the Circle? – will look at how companies can anticipate the new European regulatory framework, embrace innovation, and develop a business model where sustainability becomes a source of competitiveness and growth. In the current economic, social and political environment, Europe is facing many challenges: increased energy prices, unforeseen inflation and climate change, which add to the day-to-day challenges of running a business. Embracing the European Union’s commitment to a green and digital transformation, the textile industry needs to also move towards a new circular economy where recycling is at the core of the design process supported by digitalisation, innovation and new skills, and creativity. The conference will address explore solutions to turn quality and sustainability into a source of competitiveness.

The Porto Convention will see representatives of national and European institutions, experts from the industry and like-minded entrepreneurs come together to discuss ideas, share experiences and find solutions to face common challenges.

Source:

EURATEX

07.10.2022

AkzoNobel: Q3 update following high macro-economic uncertainty

AkzoNobel provides a Q3 update as high macro-economic uncertainty - especially in Europe and China - led to near historical low consumer confidence. In anticipation, customers and channel partners in the paints and coatings industry are proactively destocking in these regions.
 
The Q3 adjusted operating income is now expected to be in the range of €195 million to €215 million (2021: €241 million), excluding a retroactive impact from hyperinflation accounting regarding Türkiye.
 
Current demand trends are expected to continue in Q4, whilst benefits will come from the company’s own initiatives to reduce costs, improve working capital and ongoing pricing initiatives. While Q3 will see the highest raw material cost impact since the inflation cycle started early 2021, pricing will continue to offset raw material and freight inflation. Overall raw material supply is normalizing and raw material prices are starting to soften broadly.
 
Financial results for Q3 of 2022 will be announced on October 20.

AkzoNobel provides a Q3 update as high macro-economic uncertainty - especially in Europe and China - led to near historical low consumer confidence. In anticipation, customers and channel partners in the paints and coatings industry are proactively destocking in these regions.
 
The Q3 adjusted operating income is now expected to be in the range of €195 million to €215 million (2021: €241 million), excluding a retroactive impact from hyperinflation accounting regarding Türkiye.
 
Current demand trends are expected to continue in Q4, whilst benefits will come from the company’s own initiatives to reduce costs, improve working capital and ongoing pricing initiatives. While Q3 will see the highest raw material cost impact since the inflation cycle started early 2021, pricing will continue to offset raw material and freight inflation. Overall raw material supply is normalizing and raw material prices are starting to soften broadly.
 
Financial results for Q3 of 2022 will be announced on October 20.

Source:

AkzoNobel

19.09.2022

Lenzing suspends guidance for 2022

In view of the drastic deterioration of the market environment in the current quarter, the Lenzing Group suspends its guidance for the development of earnings in the 2022 financial year.

The further course of the 2022 financial year can only be estimated to a limited extent due to the extremely low visibility on the demand side and the high volatility of energy and raw material costs.

In view of the drastic deterioration of the market environment in the current quarter, the Lenzing Group suspends its guidance for the development of earnings in the 2022 financial year.

The further course of the 2022 financial year can only be estimated to a limited extent due to the extremely low visibility on the demand side and the high volatility of energy and raw material costs.

More information:
prognosis Inflation Ukraine
Source:

Lenzing Group

Photo: Pixabay
15.08.2022

Cotton prices outlook

Cotton Incorporated published its monthly economic letter of August and shared new insights of the cotton prices:

Cotton prices continue to be caught between the two competing storylines that have been in play for the past several months.
On one side, there is the deteriorating global macroeconomic situation.  The International Monetary Fund (IMF) lowered its projection for global economic growth in both 2022 (3.2%) and 2023 (2.9%) in the updates released in late July.  Current IMF forecasts are significantly beneath those from January (called for 4.4% growth in 2022 and 3.8% growth in 2023) and April (called for 3.6% growth in 2022 and 3.6% growth in 2023).  The evolution in the macroeconomy was a likely factor contributing to the shift in investors’ outlook on the commodity sector, which led to a collapse in prices for cotton and a range of other commodities in June and July.

Cotton Incorporated published its monthly economic letter of August and shared new insights of the cotton prices:

Cotton prices continue to be caught between the two competing storylines that have been in play for the past several months.
On one side, there is the deteriorating global macroeconomic situation.  The International Monetary Fund (IMF) lowered its projection for global economic growth in both 2022 (3.2%) and 2023 (2.9%) in the updates released in late July.  Current IMF forecasts are significantly beneath those from January (called for 4.4% growth in 2022 and 3.8% growth in 2023) and April (called for 3.6% growth in 2022 and 3.6% growth in 2023).  The evolution in the macroeconomy was a likely factor contributing to the shift in investors’ outlook on the commodity sector, which led to a collapse in prices for cotton and a range of other commodities in June and July.

Beyond the weakening macroeconomic environment, there also may be factors associated with cotton supply chains that could affect demand during the 2022/23 crop year.  Downstream consumer markets for cotton can be viewed as more discretionary than other spending categories, such as food, energy, and lodging, that experienced some of the sharpest effects of inflation.  Given price increases for necessities, consumers may have less income to devote to apparel and home furnishings.

In the U.S., consumer spending on clothing has been flat for the past year.  However, it has been holding at levels that are 25% higher than they were in 2019.  If U.S. consumers pull back on clothing purchases, it may hit the market just as retailers have caught up with consumer demand after the onset of the shipping crisis.  In weight volume, the cotton contained in U.S. apparel imports was up 22% year-over-year in the first half of 2022.  Relative to 2019 (pre-COVID and pre-shipping crisis), the volume in the first half of 2022 was up 23%.  Given strong import volumes, if there is a dip in consumer demand, inventory could build both at retail and upstream in supply chains.  This could lead to cancelations, potentially all the way back to the fiber level, where contracts signed at prices higher than current values could be particularly susceptible.

Tight U.S. supply is on the other side of price direction arguments.  Cotton is drought tolerant, and that is why it can be viably grown in perennially dry locations like West Texas.  However, cotton requires some moisture to germinate and generate healthy yields.  West Texas has had very little rain over the past year, and drought conditions have been extreme.  As a result, abandonment is forecast to be widespread.  It remains to be seen exactly how small the U.S. crop will be, but the current USDA forecast predicts only 12.6 million bales in 2022/23 (-5.0 million fewer bales than in 2021/22).

Meanwhile, demand for U.S. cotton has been relatively consistent, near 18 million bales over the past five crop years (an average of 15.5 million bales of exports and 2.7 million bales of domestic mill-use).  A harvest of only 12.6 million falls well short of the recent average for exports alone, and U.S. stocks were near multi-decade lows coming into 2022/23.  All these statistics suggest shipments from the world’s largest exporter may have to be rationed in 2022/23.  If cotton is not readily available from other sources, the scarcity of supply from the U.S. could support prices globally.

Simultaneously, there is weakness from the demand side.  The market has struggled to find the balance between the weakened demand environment and limited exportable supply in recent months.  The conflict between these two influences makes it difficult to discern a clear direction for prices and suggests continued volatility.

More information:
Cotton Inc. cotton
Source:

Cotton Inc.

09.08.2022

Suominen Corporation’s Half-Year Financial Report

April–June 2022 in brief:

  • Net sales increased by 4% and amounted to EUR 118.0 million (113.6)
  • Comparable EBITDA decreased to EUR 1.9 million (15.3)
  • Cash flow from operations was EUR 11.9 million (1.2)

January–June 2022 in brief:

April–June 2022 in brief:

  • Net sales increased by 4% and amounted to EUR 118.0 million (113.6)
  • Comparable EBITDA decreased to EUR 1.9 million (15.3)
  • Cash flow from operations was EUR 11.9 million (1.2)

January–June 2022 in brief:

  • Net sales were in line with the previous year and amounted to EUR 228.3 million (229.0)
  • Comparable EBITDA decreased to EUR 5.2 million (33.8)
  • Cash flow from operations was EUR 9.2 million (17.1)

Outlook for 2022 unchanged
Suominen expects that its comparable EBITDA (earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization) in 2022 will decrease clearly from 2021. The war in Ukraine has increased the already significant cost inflation in raw materials, energy, and transportation. Also, while there has been progress in the normalization of the customer inventory levels in the US, it has been somewhat slower than expected. These factors will impact the full year result negatively even though we expect that the demand for our products will improve in the second half of the year. In 2021, Suominen’s comparable EBITDA was EUR 47.0 million.

See attached document for full report.

Source:

Suominen Corporation

Foto: Pixabay
09.08.2022

McKinsey: An Bekleidung und Schuhen wird gespart

  • Sorge vor steigenden Preisen verfestigt sich

Laut einer aktuellen McKinsey-Umfrage bereiten die rasch steigenden Preise den Konsument:innen zurzeit die größte Sorge, die Corona-Pandemie spielt kaum noch eine Rolle. Rund 48% der Befragten geben an, ihre größte Sorge sei aktuell die Inflation - ein deutlicher Zuwachs gegenüber dem April.
 
„Die Sorge der Konsumenten vor weiteren Preissteigerungen verfestigt sich“, sagt der McKinsey-Partner Marcus Jacob. Die Angst vor dem Ukraine-Krieg ist dagegen in den vergangenen Monaten geringer geworden. Hatte noch im April jeder dritte Befragte (34%) die Invasion der Ukraine als größte Sorge bezeichnet, so tat dies im Juni nur noch jeder Vierte (24%). Trotz der aktuell hohen Infektionszahlen nannten nur 4% die Corona-Pandemie als größte Sorge.

  • Sorge vor steigenden Preisen verfestigt sich

Laut einer aktuellen McKinsey-Umfrage bereiten die rasch steigenden Preise den Konsument:innen zurzeit die größte Sorge, die Corona-Pandemie spielt kaum noch eine Rolle. Rund 48% der Befragten geben an, ihre größte Sorge sei aktuell die Inflation - ein deutlicher Zuwachs gegenüber dem April.
 
„Die Sorge der Konsumenten vor weiteren Preissteigerungen verfestigt sich“, sagt der McKinsey-Partner Marcus Jacob. Die Angst vor dem Ukraine-Krieg ist dagegen in den vergangenen Monaten geringer geworden. Hatte noch im April jeder dritte Befragte (34%) die Invasion der Ukraine als größte Sorge bezeichnet, so tat dies im Juni nur noch jeder Vierte (24%). Trotz der aktuell hohen Infektionszahlen nannten nur 4% die Corona-Pandemie als größte Sorge.

Die steigenden Preise haben der Umfrage zufolge bereits spürbare Auswirkungen auf den Alltag vieler Menschen. „Die große Mehrheit - 73% - hat das Einkaufsverhalten bereits verändert, um zu sparen“, so Marcus Jacob. So landen häufiger die Eigenmarken der Handelsketten in den Einkaufswagen. Statt im Supermarkt oder im Fachgeschäft wird häufiger beim Discounter eingekauft. „Dieser Trend beschleunigt sich“.

Während mehr Geld für Benzin und Lebensmittel ausgegeben werden muss, wird außerdem bei nicht essentiellen Ausgaben wie beispielsweise Bekleidung, Schuhen, aber auch Möbel oder Elektronik gespart. 59% der Befragten geben an, sie würden inzwischen genauer auf den eigenen Energieverbrauch achten.

More information:
Umfrage McKinsey Inflation
Source:

McKinsey&Company

27.07.2022

Autoneum: Half Year Results 2022

Lower volumes due to geopolitical developments and the sharp rise in inflation impacted the result in the first half of 2022. In a slightly declining market, Autoneum increased revenue in local currencies by 0.5%. At CHF 888.7 million, revenue in Swiss francs reached the previous year's level. Despite the challenging environment, Autoneum achieved a positive operating result of CHF 6.4 million (EBIT margin: 0.7%). The net result decreased to CHF –12.8 million. On the other hand, Autoneum was able to generate a solid free cash flow of CHF 45.2 million. A high demand for sustainable products for electric vehicles confirms that Autoneum is well positioned for this growing market of the future.

Lower volumes due to geopolitical developments and the sharp rise in inflation impacted the result in the first half of 2022. In a slightly declining market, Autoneum increased revenue in local currencies by 0.5%. At CHF 888.7 million, revenue in Swiss francs reached the previous year's level. Despite the challenging environment, Autoneum achieved a positive operating result of CHF 6.4 million (EBIT margin: 0.7%). The net result decreased to CHF –12.8 million. On the other hand, Autoneum was able to generate a solid free cash flow of CHF 45.2 million. A high demand for sustainable products for electric vehicles confirms that Autoneum is well positioned for this growing market of the future.

Current geopolitical developments substantially affected business performance in the first half of 2022. They are accompanied by accelerating inflation and significant price increases in the commodities markets, which the war in Ukraine has further exacerbated. These developments are also delaying market recovery in the automotive industry. Autoneum does everything it can to minimize the impact on the Group. Despite the present challenges, we will continue to implement our strategy, focusing on innovative and sustainable technologies for growing markets of the future.

  • Revenue development influenced by the war in Ukraine and supply chain bottlenecks*
  • Low production volumes and high inflation impact profitability*
  • Solid free cash flow enables further reduction in net debt*
  • Business Groups*
  • Well positioned for e-mobility and sustainability*
  • Expanding the product portfolio for electric vehicles*
  • Autoneum joins the Science Based Targets initiative*

Outlook
According to global market forecasts1, automobile production will pick up again in the second half of the year with growth of 8.8% compared with the first half-year 2022. For full-year 2022, global automobile production is projected to reach 80.8 million vehicles, which is equivalent to a 4.7% increase on 2021. Based on the market forecasts, Autoneum expects to improve the operating result for the second half of the year. This will be supported by ongoing customer negotiations with a view to fair sharing of costs, the accompanying contribution of vehicle manufacturers to shouldering the sharp increases in material, energy and transport costs and the foreseeable normalization of production after the easing of lockdown measures in China. On this basis, Autoneum expects substantially enhanced results for full-year 2022, as well as an improvement in the EBIT margin to 2.0% to 3.0%. Free cash flow is expected to be in the mid to high double-digit million range for the full year 2022.

*For more information see attached document

1Source: IHS “Light Vehicle Production Forecasts” – July 15, 2022

More information:
Autoneum supply chain acoustic
Source:

Autoneum Management AG

21.07.2022

NCTO: China Penalty Tariffs on finished textiles and apparel to be maintained

  • China Penalty Tariffs on Finished Textiles & Apparel Give U.S. Companies a Chance to Compete and are a Powerful Trade-Negotiation Tool, NCTO Tells U.S. International Trade Commission

Section 301 penalty tariffs on finished Chinese textile and apparel imports give American manufacturers a chance to compete and provide trade officials with an essential trade negotiation tool, the National Council of Textile Organizations (NCTO) told a key government panel today in a formal written submission. Removing them, the association said, would reward China, put U.S. manufacturers at a competitive disadvantage and do nothing to reduce inflation.

Those were among the key points outlined by NCTO President and CEO Kim Glas in a written testimony submitted to the U.S. International Trade Commission during three days of hearings on the economic impact of Section 301 China tariffs and Section 232 steel tariffs on U.S. industries.

  • China Penalty Tariffs on Finished Textiles & Apparel Give U.S. Companies a Chance to Compete and are a Powerful Trade-Negotiation Tool, NCTO Tells U.S. International Trade Commission

Section 301 penalty tariffs on finished Chinese textile and apparel imports give American manufacturers a chance to compete and provide trade officials with an essential trade negotiation tool, the National Council of Textile Organizations (NCTO) told a key government panel today in a formal written submission. Removing them, the association said, would reward China, put U.S. manufacturers at a competitive disadvantage and do nothing to reduce inflation.

Those were among the key points outlined by NCTO President and CEO Kim Glas in a written testimony submitted to the U.S. International Trade Commission during three days of hearings on the economic impact of Section 301 China tariffs and Section 232 steel tariffs on U.S. industries.

The 301 penalty tariffs should be maintained “absent substantive improvements in China’s pervasive, predatory trade practices,” Glas said in her testimony.  China’s illegal actions “have put U.S. companies at a serious disadvantage, and tariffs give American manufacturers a chance to compete.” Glas noted that U.S. trade officials have “stressed that the penalty tariffs also create leverage and are a ‘significant tool’ in ongoing negotiations with China.”
 
While some advocates for lifting the tariffs point to concerns about inflation, Glas said, “canceling these penalty duties would do little to ease Americans’ inflationary pains.” She also noted that “apparel prices out of China continue to hit rock bottom even with the Section 301 tariffs in place. As detailed in an economic study recently released by Werner International, U.S. import prices for apparel from China have dropped 25 percent since 2019 and 50 percent since 2011.”

Glas also warned that lifting the tariffs would have “a substantial negative ripple effect” on U.S. free-trade agreements, including undermining those with Western Hemisphere partners that have established shorter coproduction supply chains and serve other U.S. and regional interests.

The Section 301 tariffs were first imposed in 2018 in response to China’s persistent violations of intellectual property rules. By law, they are now under review.

More information:
NCTO Tariffs China Penalty Tariffs
Source:

National Council of Textile Organizations

20.07.2022

AkzoNobel publishes results for second quarter 2022

Akzo Nobel N.V.  publishes results for second quarter 2022

Highlights Grow & Deliver (compared with Q2 2021)

  • Revenue up 14% and 10% higher in constant currencies1, pricing up 16%
  • ROS2 at 8.7% (2021: 13.3%), resulting from lower volumes and continued raw material and freight costs inflation
  • Adjusted EBITDA at €337 million (2021: €419 million)
  • Acquisition of Grupo Orbis completed in April 2022. Intended acquisition of Kansai Paint’s business in Africa announced in June 2022. Intended acquisition of the liquid wheel coatings business of Germany-based Lankwitzer Lackfabrik GmbH announced in July 2022

Highlights Q2 2022 (compared with Q2 2021)

Akzo Nobel N.V.  publishes results for second quarter 2022

Highlights Grow & Deliver (compared with Q2 2021)

  • Revenue up 14% and 10% higher in constant currencies1, pricing up 16%
  • ROS2 at 8.7% (2021: 13.3%), resulting from lower volumes and continued raw material and freight costs inflation
  • Adjusted EBITDA at €337 million (2021: €419 million)
  • Acquisition of Grupo Orbis completed in April 2022. Intended acquisition of Kansai Paint’s business in Africa announced in June 2022. Intended acquisition of the liquid wheel coatings business of Germany-based Lankwitzer Lackfabrik GmbH announced in July 2022

Highlights Q2 2022 (compared with Q2 2021)

  • Pricing up 16%; offsetting the increase of raw material and other variable costs. Volumes 9% lower
  • Operating income at €205 million (2021: €384 million), includes €44 million negative impact from Identified items (2021: €49 million net positive impact). OPI margin 7.2% (2021: 15.3%)
  • Adjusted operating income3 at €249 million (2021: €335 million)
  • Net cash from operating activities decreased to negative €52 million (2021: positive €168 million)
  • Net income attributable to shareholders at €106 million (2021: €261 million)
  • EPS from total operations at €0.60 (2021: €1.40); adjusted EPS from continuing operations at €0.84 (2021: €1.20)
More information:
AkzoNobel Coatings
Source:

AkzoNobel

13.07.2022

Cotton Market Fundamentals & Price Outlook – July 22

SUPPLY, DEMAND, & TRADE
The latest USDA report featured reductions to figures for both world production and mill-use for both the 2021/22 and 2022/23 crop years.  For 2021/22, the global production estimate was lowered -0.7 million bales (to 116.2 million) and global consumption was lowered -1.9 million bales (to 119.8 million).  For 2022/23, the global production forecast was lowered -1.2 million bales (to 120.7 million) and global consumption was lowered -1.6 million bales (to 119.9 million).

With the decreases in use exceeding the declines in production, figures for global ending stocks increased.  For 2021/22, the projection rose +1.1 million bales (to 84.0 million).  For 2022/23, the forecast increased +1.6 million bales (to 84.3 million).

At the country-level, the largest changes to 2021/22 production were for Brazil (-400,000 bales to 12.3 million) and Uzbekistan (-100,00 bales to 2.7 million).  The largest changes for the 2022/23 harvest were for the U.S. (-1.0 million bales to 15.5 million) and Brazil (-200,000 bales to 13.0 million).

SUPPLY, DEMAND, & TRADE
The latest USDA report featured reductions to figures for both world production and mill-use for both the 2021/22 and 2022/23 crop years.  For 2021/22, the global production estimate was lowered -0.7 million bales (to 116.2 million) and global consumption was lowered -1.9 million bales (to 119.8 million).  For 2022/23, the global production forecast was lowered -1.2 million bales (to 120.7 million) and global consumption was lowered -1.6 million bales (to 119.9 million).

With the decreases in use exceeding the declines in production, figures for global ending stocks increased.  For 2021/22, the projection rose +1.1 million bales (to 84.0 million).  For 2022/23, the forecast increased +1.6 million bales (to 84.3 million).

At the country-level, the largest changes to 2021/22 production were for Brazil (-400,000 bales to 12.3 million) and Uzbekistan (-100,00 bales to 2.7 million).  The largest changes for the 2022/23 harvest were for the U.S. (-1.0 million bales to 15.5 million) and Brazil (-200,000 bales to 13.0 million).

It may be notable that there were no upward country-level revisions for mill-use in either 2021/22 or 2022/23.  The largest revisions for 2021/22 included those for China (-1.0 million to 37.0 million), Vietnam (-400,000 bales to 6.9 million), Bangladesh (-300,000 to 8.0 million), Pakistan (-100,000 bales to 10.9 million), and Uzbekistan (-100,000 bales to 2.7 million).  For 2022/23, consumption estimates were lowered for China (-500,000 bales to 37.5 million), India (-500,000 bales to 25.0 million), Bangladesh (-300,000 bales to 8.6 million), and Vietnam (-300,000 bales to 7.1 million).
The global trade forecast for 2022/23 was lowered -1.1 million bales (to 46.4 million).  The most significant changes on the import side included those for China (-500,000 bales to 10.0 million), Bangladesh (-300,000 bales to 8.5 million), and Vietnam (-300,000 bales to 7.2 million).  On the export side, the largest updates included those for the U.S. (-500,000 bales to 14.0 million) and Australia (+300,000 bales to 6.0 million).
 
PRICE OUTLOOK
Recent volatility was not limited to the cotton market.  A wide range of commodities lost significant value in June.  Between June 9th and July 5th (dates chosen unsystematically to describe the magnitude of declines), cotton fell -25% (NY/ICE December futures), corn fell -19% (Chicago Board of Trade, December contract), soybeans fell -17% (Chicago Board of Trade, November contract), wheat fell -25% (Chicago Board of Trade, December contract), copper fell -20% (London Metal Exchange, nearby), and Brent crude oil fell -12% (ICE, nearby).

The breadth of losses throughout the commodity sector suggests a sea change in investor sentiment for the entire category.  The effects of inflation, the withdrawal of stimulus, rising interest rates, and concerns about a possible recession could all be reasons explaining a reversal of speculative bets, and all could be contributors to the losses.  While the macroeconomic environment can be expected to continue to weigh on prices, there are also supportive forces for the market that are specific to cotton.

The current USDA forecast for U.S. cotton production is 15.5 million bales, and it may get smaller over time because of the severe drought in West Texas.  The current harvest figure is two million bales lower than the 2021/22 number and is equal to the five-year average for U.S. cotton exports (2017/18-2021/22).  On top of exports, the U.S. will need to supply domestic mills with 2.5 million bales.  The last time the U.S. had a severely drought-impacted crop (2020/21), the harvest was only 14.6 million bales.  In that crop year, the U.S. was able to export more than it grew because it had accumulated stocks in the previous year.  The U.S. is coming into the 2022/23 crop year with low stocks.  This suggests U.S. shipments may have been rationed.  Since the U.S. is the world’s largest exporter, this may lend some support to prices internationally.

More information:
cotton Cotton USA Cotton Inc.
Source:

Cotton Incorporated

Photo: ACIMIT
13.07.2022

Italian textile machinery sector returning to pre-Covid levels

  • Annual assembly of ACIMIT, the Association of Italian Textile Machinery Manufacturers

  • Digitalization and Sustainability Key to Resiliency for Italian Textile Machinery Sector

The objective critical issues faced by Italy as a whole throughout the course of 2021, primarily dictated by a pandemic that upset any and all pre-existing equilibriums, have not slowed or halted the Italian textile machinery sector.

Indeed, data presented during the annual assembly of ACIMIT, the Association of Italian Textile Machinery Manufacturers, held on 1 July proved decidedly positive, showing that in 2021 the sector recovered significantly compared to 2020, to the point of returning to pre-Covid levels.

Specifically, Italian textile machinery production amounted to 2.388 billion euros (+35% over 2020 and + 5% over 2019), with total exports amounting to 2.031 billion euros (+37% over 2020 and +9% over 2019).

  • Annual assembly of ACIMIT, the Association of Italian Textile Machinery Manufacturers

  • Digitalization and Sustainability Key to Resiliency for Italian Textile Machinery Sector

The objective critical issues faced by Italy as a whole throughout the course of 2021, primarily dictated by a pandemic that upset any and all pre-existing equilibriums, have not slowed or halted the Italian textile machinery sector.

Indeed, data presented during the annual assembly of ACIMIT, the Association of Italian Textile Machinery Manufacturers, held on 1 July proved decidedly positive, showing that in 2021 the sector recovered significantly compared to 2020, to the point of returning to pre-Covid levels.

Specifically, Italian textile machinery production amounted to 2.388 billion euros (+35% over 2020 and + 5% over 2019), with total exports amounting to 2.031 billion euros (+37% over 2020 and +9% over 2019).

However, these results do not cancel the obstacles that companies are still facing. Looking to the near future, expectations are for a rather uncertain outlook, as underscored by ACIMIT President Alessandro Zucchi: “2022 remains a year replete with unknown factors, starting with the Russian-Ukrainian conflict, along with the persistence of the pandemic, which seriously risk delaying expected growth consolidation for businesses in the sector. Difficulties in finding raw materials and components negatively affect the completion and fulfilment of orders processed as far back as 2021. To boot, rising energy costs and inflationary trends affecting numerous commodities are depressing overall business confidence. So the outlook for the sector is not so good.”
As such, the two cornerstones through which ACIMIT aims to support the Italian textile machinery sector are digitilization and sustainability.

4.0: The textile machinery sector looks to the future
The road to digital transformation has already led numerous manufacturers to completely rethink their production processes, rendering them more efficient and l ess expensive. The digital world is moving ahead at a decisive rate in the textile machinery sector, where the buzzwords are increasingly, for instance, the Internet of Things connecting to a company’s ecosystem, machine learning algorithms applied to production, predictive maintenance, and the integrated cloud management of various production departments. It is no coincidence that ACIMIT has focused decisively on its Digital Ready project, through which Italian textile machinery that adopt a common set of data are certified, with the aim of facilitating integration with the operating systems of client companies (ERP, MES, CRM, etc.).

A green soul
Combining production efficiency and respect for the environment: a challenge ACIMIT has made its own and which it promotes among its members through the Sustainable Technologies project. Launched by the association as early as 2011, the project highlights the commitment of Italian textile machinery manufacturers in the area of sustainability. At the heart of the project is the Green Label, a form of certification specifically for Italian textile machinery which highlights its energy and environmental performance. An all-Italian seal of approval developed in collaboration with RINA, an international certification body.
The assembly held on 1 July provided an opportunity to take stock of the Sustainable Technologies project, more specifically, with the presentation of the Rina Consulting survey on the Green Label’s evolution and impact in recent years.

The results have confirmed the initiative’s extreme validity. The technological advances implemented by the association’s machinery producers participating in the project have effectively translated into benefits in terms of environmental impact (reduction of CO2 equivalent emissions for machinery), as well as economic advantages for machinery users.

With reference to the year 2021, a total of 204,598 tons of CO2 emissions avoided on an annual basis have been quantified, thanks to the implementation of improvements on machinery. This is a truly significant reduction which, for the sake of comparison, corresponds to the carbon dioxide emissions generated by 36,864 automobiles travelling an average of 35,000 km a year. In terms of energy savings, the use of green labeled textile machinery has provided excellent performances in allowing for a reduction of up to 84% in consumption.

A round table discussion on the Green Label’s primary purpose
The environmental and economic impact generated in production processes for Italian textile machinery through the use of Green Label technologies was the focus of the round table which concluded the ACIMIT assembly.

Moderated by Aurora Magni (professor of the Industrial Systems Sustainability course at the LIUC School of Engineering), the debate involved Gianluca Brenna (Lipomo Printing House administrator and Vice President of the Italian Fashion System for Welfare), Pietro Pin (Benetton Group consultant and President of UNI for the textile-clothing area), Giorgio Ravasio (Italy Country Manager for Vivienne Westwood), as well as ACIMIT President Alessandro Zucchi.

Called on to compare common factors in their experiences relating to environmental transition processes for their respective companies, the participants were unanimous: the future of Italian textile machinery can no longer ignore advanced technology developments capable of offering sustainable solutions with a low environmental impact while also reducing production costs. This philosophy has by now been consolidated, and has proven to lead directly to a circular economy outlook.

The upcoming ITMA 2023 exhibition
Lastly, a word on ITMA 2023, the most important international exhibition for textile machinery, to be held in Italy from 8 to 14 June 2023 at Fiera-Milano Rho. Marking the 19th edition of ITMA, this trade fair is an essential event for the entire industry worldwide, providing a global showcase for numerous innovative operational solutions on display. A marketplace that offers participants extraordinary business opportunities. The participation of Italian companies is managed by ACIMIT.

Photo: © 2022, Steiger Participations
11.07.2022

Swiss Textile Machinery technology and innovations for technical textiles

New ideas were exchanged, brainstormed, and discussed freely at members’ booths at the Swiss Textile Machinery Pavilion during the recent Techtextil in Frankfurt. “Customers and researchers met Swiss textile machinery companies to explore the possibility of the not-yet-invented. “We regard our Pavilion as the place where future innovations catch a spark,” says Cornelia Buchwalder, Secretary General of the Swiss Textile Machinery Association. Further developments in the field of hybrid yarns were a hot topic. One example of this involves producing a yarn which has all the typical characteristics and advantages of carbon – but which also prioritizes careful use of resources, combining carbon fibres with thermoplastics.

Technical textiles cover a vast range of applications, and it’s still growing thanks to intensive research by specialist institutes and universities. Many members of the Swiss Textile Machinery Association maintain long-standing partnership with such bodies. Innovations are often joint efforts.

New ideas were exchanged, brainstormed, and discussed freely at members’ booths at the Swiss Textile Machinery Pavilion during the recent Techtextil in Frankfurt. “Customers and researchers met Swiss textile machinery companies to explore the possibility of the not-yet-invented. “We regard our Pavilion as the place where future innovations catch a spark,” says Cornelia Buchwalder, Secretary General of the Swiss Textile Machinery Association. Further developments in the field of hybrid yarns were a hot topic. One example of this involves producing a yarn which has all the typical characteristics and advantages of carbon – but which also prioritizes careful use of resources, combining carbon fibres with thermoplastics.

Technical textiles cover a vast range of applications, and it’s still growing thanks to intensive research by specialist institutes and universities. Many members of the Swiss Textile Machinery Association maintain long-standing partnership with such bodies. Innovations are often joint efforts.

Feel-good technical fabrics
Some technical textiles feel like a second skin. A well-known example is activewear from the ‘sport tech’ field. Activewear includes breathable clothing, usually consisting of a three-layer-laminate: an inner lining, a breathable membrane in the center, and an outer fabric. The challenge is to bond the individual layers without losing breathability or softness, while meeting technical requirements such as resistance to a number of wash cycles.

Bonding solutions meeting top quality requirements, as well as ambitious standards for environmental protection and sustainability, were reinvented by the Cavitec brand from the Santex Rimar Group. This company’s hotmelt technology uses one-component polymers applied to textiles in a hot, molten state. Bonding based on hotmelts is both water- and solvent-free. Drying and exhaust air cleaning are not necessary, which is an ecological advantage. Energy consumption is also significantly lower. Cavitec hotmelt technology is also developed for laminated medical protection fabrics which are safe, high-quality and sustainable. These fabrics can be washed, sterilized, and used again.   

A second skin with added value is the result of Jakob Müller Group’s cooperation with an institute for an established outdoor fashion brand. They have devised a heating mat applied as an inner jacket. Outdoor gear with a heated inlay offers the wearer a comfortable feeling even in a cold climate. The heating mat is particularly light, breathable, flexible and adjustable to three temperature levels.

Fabrics with these advantages are now possible thanks to multi direct weaving (MDW) technology from the Jakob Müller Group. A lacquer-insulated heating strand is inserted into the base textile as a ‘meander’ using MDW technology. The technology is offered with both label weaving machines and the latest generation of ribbon weaving machines. The textile pocket calculator is another MDW based future-oriented application developed in cooperation with a textile research institute.

Safety and health
Life-saving reliability is a must for vehicle airbags. They have to fulfil high security aspects, and must remain inflated for several seconds when an accident occurs. Airbags made of flat-woven fabric – cut and seamed – can show weakness at seams during the inflation phase. Latest Jacquard technology by Stäubli enables one-piece-woven (OPW) airbags to be produced, creating shape and structure in a single process. The final product is an airbag consisting of a sealed cushion with woven seams. OPW airbag weaving reduces the number of production steps, and increases the security aspects.
Another big advantage of Stäubli’s new weaving technology is the flexibility in formats required in today’s mid- and upper-range cars, where lateral protection (in the seat or in the roof over the door) has become standard and is designed in line with the car shape. Safe airbags are woven on modern high-speed weaving machines. The warp material, the variety of fabric patterns, and the importance of precisely shaped airbags require the use of a robust and reliable Jacquard machine.

A revolution for orthopaedic patients is a knitting machine from Steiger Participations, which uses compressive yarns developed to meet the needs of the specific health market. This machine model was exclusively designed for production with inlaid elastic yarns and offers optimum performance with guaranteed final product quality.

In the orthopaedic field, many Steiger flat knitting machines have already been operating as automatic, custom-made production systems. For example, the dimensions of an injured limb are taken by the doctor and fed into a web-based application. The doctor selects the compression class in the various sections of the item and a data file created by the software automatically applies a preconfigured program. With no human intervention required, the program is generated and produced on the machine, precisely matching the patient’s dimensions. Each product is different, and generally available within 48 hours.

22.06.2022

Lenzing AG revises its dividend policy

Minimum dividend of EUR 4.50 per share as of the 2023 financial year

Having concluded its strategy update, the Managing Board of Lenzing AG decided to revise its dividend policy today. This demonstrates Lenzing’s confidence in its ambitious growth plans and its ability to consistently providing attractive dividends to shareholders.

As of the 2023 financial year (with payment scheduled for 2024), Lenzing plans to pay an annual dividend of at least EUR 4.50 per share (adjusted for inflation for the years thereafter). The revised dividend policy is subject to the approval of the Supervisory Board.

The payment of the dividend in any year will be subject to the specific dividend proposals of the Managing Board and the Supervisory Board. These proposals may deviate from the new dividend policy if appropriate under the then prevailing circumstances and will be subject to the approval of the Annual General Meeting.

Minimum dividend of EUR 4.50 per share as of the 2023 financial year

Having concluded its strategy update, the Managing Board of Lenzing AG decided to revise its dividend policy today. This demonstrates Lenzing’s confidence in its ambitious growth plans and its ability to consistently providing attractive dividends to shareholders.

As of the 2023 financial year (with payment scheduled for 2024), Lenzing plans to pay an annual dividend of at least EUR 4.50 per share (adjusted for inflation for the years thereafter). The revised dividend policy is subject to the approval of the Supervisory Board.

The payment of the dividend in any year will be subject to the specific dividend proposals of the Managing Board and the Supervisory Board. These proposals may deviate from the new dividend policy if appropriate under the then prevailing circumstances and will be subject to the approval of the Annual General Meeting.

More information:
dividend Lenzing AG
Source:

Lenzing AG

17.06.2022

"Lifting Tariffs Would Cement China’s Dominance of Global Manufacturing"

Textile Groups Urge U.S. to Maintain Penalty Tariffs on Finished Products

The Biden administration should maintain Section 301 penalty tariffs on finished textiles and apparel or risk reversing once-in-a-lifetime nearshoring trends and undermining critical investments and jobs in the U.S. and Western Hemisphere, three key American textile manufacturing groups said today.

In a formal submission to the U.S. Trade Representative’s (USTR) office, which is conducting a four-year statutory review of the tariffs, the associations expressed strong support for the continuation of penalty tariffs on imports from China and warned of the consequences associated with removing the tariffs.

“A key aspect of [the Biden administration’s trade] policy is the need to maintain Section 301 tariffs, absent substantive improvements in China’s pervasive, predatory trade practices,” the groups said. Lifting the tariffs “would also do nothing to achieve the administration’s goal of easing inflationary pressures, as apparel prices out of China continue to hit rock bottom even with the Section 301 tariffs,” they noted.

Textile Groups Urge U.S. to Maintain Penalty Tariffs on Finished Products

The Biden administration should maintain Section 301 penalty tariffs on finished textiles and apparel or risk reversing once-in-a-lifetime nearshoring trends and undermining critical investments and jobs in the U.S. and Western Hemisphere, three key American textile manufacturing groups said today.

In a formal submission to the U.S. Trade Representative’s (USTR) office, which is conducting a four-year statutory review of the tariffs, the associations expressed strong support for the continuation of penalty tariffs on imports from China and warned of the consequences associated with removing the tariffs.

“A key aspect of [the Biden administration’s trade] policy is the need to maintain Section 301 tariffs, absent substantive improvements in China’s pervasive, predatory trade practices,” the groups said. Lifting the tariffs “would also do nothing to achieve the administration’s goal of easing inflationary pressures, as apparel prices out of China continue to hit rock bottom even with the Section 301 tariffs,” they noted.

The submission was filed by the National Council of Textile Organizations (NCTO) and the Narrow Fabrics Institute (NFI) and Industrial Fabrics Institute (USIFI) – both divisions of the Advanced Textiles Association (ATA).  The associations represent the entirety of the U.S. textile production chain.

“For decades, China’s illegal actions have undermined virtually every domestic manufacturing sector and contributed to the direct loss of millions of U.S. jobs. These devastating state-sponsored practices include intellectual property theft as well as pervasive state-ownership of manufacturing, industrial subsidies, and abhorrent labor and human rights abuses in the Xinjiang region,” they noted. “Cancelling these tariffs would create further unhealthy dependence on Chinese supply chains and embolden future systematic trade abuses as bad actors know that the U.S. will not hold them accountable.”

The tariffs were imposed on China beginning in 2018 in response to China’s continuing IP and related trade violations. China has since failed to comply with an agreement it reached with the United States in 2020.

More information:
NCTO Tariffs China
Source:

NCTO

15.06.2022

Autoneum updates its outlook for 2022 as a result of the Ukraine war

Due to the impact of the war in Ukraine on the automotive industry and vehicle production as well as of rising inflation, Autoneum is adjusting its corporate outlook for the 2022 financial year. The market recovery will be delayed by current developments.

Since the outbreak of war in Ukraine, new bottlenecks in global supply and logistics chains have been impacting vehicle manufacturer production volumes and thus slowing the revenue and earnings development of the automotive supply industry, especially in Europe. Current developments are accompanied by accelerated inflation and significant price increases on the commodities markets, which have been further exacerbated by the war. These are felt at Autoneum through rising material, energy and transport costs. With regard to the rising costs, automotive manufacturers and suppliers are now required to ensure a fair burden sharing as partners.

Due to the impact of the war in Ukraine on the automotive industry and vehicle production as well as of rising inflation, Autoneum is adjusting its corporate outlook for the 2022 financial year. The market recovery will be delayed by current developments.

Since the outbreak of war in Ukraine, new bottlenecks in global supply and logistics chains have been impacting vehicle manufacturer production volumes and thus slowing the revenue and earnings development of the automotive supply industry, especially in Europe. Current developments are accompanied by accelerated inflation and significant price increases on the commodities markets, which have been further exacerbated by the war. These are felt at Autoneum through rising material, energy and transport costs. With regard to the rising costs, automotive manufacturers and suppliers are now required to ensure a fair burden sharing as partners.

In addition, renewed coronavirus-related lockdowns in China are delaying growth in Asia. According to the revised market forecasts1), global automobile production is expected to reach 80.4 million units in 2022, which represents an increase of 4.1% compared to 2021. Growth will thus be significantly lower than was still expected in mid-February.

Autoneum will do its utmost to minimize the impact on the Group. Despite the present challenges, the strategy will continue to be consistently implemented with a focus on innovative and sustainable technologies for growing markets of the future.

Based on current developments and knowledge, Autoneum has updated the forecasts that it presented at the Media Conference, which had not yet included the impacts of the war as outlined above. Autoneum continues to expect revenue to develop in line with the market. For the first half of the year, the Company expects an EBIT margin at break-even level. On the basis of the ongoing collaborative discussions with customers to participate in the sharing of the sharply increased energy and material costs, Autoneum anticipates an improvement in the EBIT margin to 2.0 to 3.0% (previously: 4.0 to 5.0%) for the full year 2022. Free cash flow for 2022 is expected to be in the mid to high double-digit million range.

Autoneum is very well positioned for the transformation of the automotive industry towards e-mobility and sustainability. Our product portfolio is suitable for all drive types, whether internal combustion, hybrid or pure electric vehicles. The medium-term forecasts that Autoneum published in November 2021 remain unchanged positive. The timing of the market recovery will be delayed by current events and will also depend on further geopolitical developments.

Source:

Autoneum Management AG

Photo: Ralph Koch for Mayer & Cie.
29.04.2022

Mayer & Cie. at the ITM

  • Turkish circular knitting market offers prospects in turbulent times

After a four-year, Covid-related break the German circular knitting machine manufacturer Mayer & Cie. is exhibiting with its Turkish representative Mayer Mümessillik (MMÜ) once more at the important International Textile Machinery Exhibition (ITM) in Istanbul. At Booth 713 in Hall 8, Mayer & Cie. will present three machines: the D4-2.2 X interlock machine, the OV 3.2 QCe for double jersey structures and the MV 4 3.2 II for single jersey fabrics. For the Mayer & Cie. and MMÜ team the focus will be on in-person contacts with customers, suppliers and partners. Despite the tense international situation both the manufacturer and its representative are positive about the medium-term outlook for the Turkish market.

  • Turkish circular knitting market offers prospects in turbulent times

After a four-year, Covid-related break the German circular knitting machine manufacturer Mayer & Cie. is exhibiting with its Turkish representative Mayer Mümessillik (MMÜ) once more at the important International Textile Machinery Exhibition (ITM) in Istanbul. At Booth 713 in Hall 8, Mayer & Cie. will present three machines: the D4-2.2 X interlock machine, the OV 3.2 QCe for double jersey structures and the MV 4 3.2 II for single jersey fabrics. For the Mayer & Cie. and MMÜ team the focus will be on in-person contacts with customers, suppliers and partners. Despite the tense international situation both the manufacturer and its representative are positive about the medium-term outlook for the Turkish market.

Turkey is a market with prospects
“The challenges that the global economy faces are at present enormously wide-ranging, of course,” says Mayer & Cie.’s Turkey specialist Stefan Bühler. “The Russian invasion of the Ukraine, supply chain outages, shortages of raw materials and skyrocketing energy prices all create uncertainty.” And then there is galloping inflation in Turkey and elections in 2023. Yet despite, and in part because of, this state of affairs Bühler and Kahraman Güveri, CEO of Mayer & Cie.’s Turkish representative MMÜ, hold a positive view of the market outlook for the years ahead. Large orders, especially for standard products, are on the increase, Kahraman Güveri explains. That leads to new investments, new companies and a growing demand for refurbished machines that then need to be replaced by new machines elsewhere. And former commission merchants are now enterprises in their own right.

“Apart from that, Turkey benefits from its proximity to Europe, transport routes are manageable,” says Stefan Bühler. “This location advantage attracts brand manufacturers who together with their orders bring new approaches, new designs and new technologies into the country.” And Turkey’s already very highly developed textiles sector benefits too. That, says Kahraman Güveri, is why one can be confident for the next few years, “at least for as long as nothing unforeseen happens”.

Established machines with that something special: OV 3.2 QCe for double jersey structures
The portfolio of machines that Mayer & Cie. is exhibiting at the ITM is tried, trusted and popular. The OV 3.2 QCe is a specialist for interlock fabrics and double jersey structures that it knits in both filament and synthetic fibre yarns. With a conversion kit the OV 3.2 QCe also qualifies as a producer of 8-lock structures, spacer fabrics and fine gauges. The machine is available in a choice of three frames: from open-width and industrial to giant frame. Stefan Bühler, regional sales manager for Turkey, has this to say: “Not for nothing has the OV 3. 2 QCe been one of our most popular machines for years. It is mainly used for sportswear and for leisure- and outerwear.” In Istanbul the OV 3.2 QCe on show will be a 30-inch, E40-gauge model.

D4-2.2 X for fine rib and interlock fabrics
The double-jersey D4-2.2 X is an obvious choice for knitting fine rib fabrics of up to E28 gauge. Spacer and interlock fabrics are also part of the machine’s established repertoire. And it can produce elastomeric plating in both cylinder and dial cam. No matter which of these tasks is assigned to the D4-2.2 X, it performs it with impressive productivity.

MV 4 3.2 II for flexibility in the single jersey sector
In the single jersey sector, the long-established German firm delivers a literally fine solution. The MV 4 3.2 II on show at the ITM knits to an E38 gauge. The machine can also be supplied for gauges from E14 to E60. It is, in addition, highly flexible, with a repertoire that ranges from piqué and double piqué to one-thread fleece and smooth single jersey.

Source:

Mayer & Cie.