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02.12.2022

Indorama Ventures signs ESG-Linked Revolving Credit Facility

Indorama Ventures Public Company Limited (IVL) has signed an ESG-Linked Revolving Credit Facility of €275 million with six syndicate banks, a further boost to the company’s long-standing commitment to sustainability-led corporate financing.

Tied to IVL’s ESG risk rating, the revolving credit facility’s pricing mechanism results in margin adjustments related to management score improvements across the Material ESG Issues as defined by independent sustainability and corporate governance research firms. The facility is available to IVL subsidiaries in Europe for two-years with the option to extend for one more year.

Indorama Ventures Public Company Limited (IVL) has signed an ESG-Linked Revolving Credit Facility of €275 million with six syndicate banks, a further boost to the company’s long-standing commitment to sustainability-led corporate financing.

Tied to IVL’s ESG risk rating, the revolving credit facility’s pricing mechanism results in margin adjustments related to management score improvements across the Material ESG Issues as defined by independent sustainability and corporate governance research firms. The facility is available to IVL subsidiaries in Europe for two-years with the option to extend for one more year.

The facility is part of IVL’s corporate financing strategy across a range of instruments linked to the company’s ESG and sustainability commitments. In November 2021, the company issued a THB 10 billion triple-tranche Sustainability-Linked Bond (SLB), the largest SLB issued in Thailand. IVL is on track to achieve its 2025 ESG goals. More ambitious 2030 targets include a 30% reduction in Scope 1 & 2 combined greenhouse gas (GHG) intensity, 15% reduction in energy intensity, 25% use of renewable electricity, 20% reduction in water intensity, 90% diversion of waste from landfill, recycle 1.5 million tons in PET bale input annually.

 

 

Source:

Indorama Ventures Public Company Limited

(c) Robin Inizan – Lucas Pavy Production
Tearing line by ANDRITZ in operation at the Renaissance Textile plant
11.11.2022

Renaissance Textile starts up the first textile recycling line by ANDRITZ in France

Renaissance Textile in Laval, France has successfully started up a complete textile recycling line, delivered, installed, and commissioned by ANDRITZ Laroche, part of the international technology group ANDRITZ.

The ANDRITZ textile recycling equipment enabled Renaissance Textile to become the first French recycling platform dedicated to industrial end-of-life textiles. The project aims to produce new fibers from the collected post-consumer apparel, which will be used to weave new recycled fabrics in the end.

The new 12,000 m² plant is equipped with a complete tearing line whose design is the result of close collaboration between R&D specialists from ANDRITZ Laroche and Renaissance Textile, as well as customized trials carried out jointly by the two parties at the ANDRITZ technical center in Cours, France.

Renaissance Textile in Laval, France has successfully started up a complete textile recycling line, delivered, installed, and commissioned by ANDRITZ Laroche, part of the international technology group ANDRITZ.

The ANDRITZ textile recycling equipment enabled Renaissance Textile to become the first French recycling platform dedicated to industrial end-of-life textiles. The project aims to produce new fibers from the collected post-consumer apparel, which will be used to weave new recycled fabrics in the end.

The new 12,000 m² plant is equipped with a complete tearing line whose design is the result of close collaboration between R&D specialists from ANDRITZ Laroche and Renaissance Textile, as well as customized trials carried out jointly by the two parties at the ANDRITZ technical center in Cours, France.

The new clothing produced based on this type of circular economy model thus reflects the social and sustainability commitments of Renaissance Textile in terms of decarbonizing the textile industry, the fight against global warming, autonomy in raw material sourcing, and promotion of local staffing, particularly for people who have been unemployed for a long time or are seeking to enter the labor market for the first time. By 2025, for example, Renaissance Textile plans to create no less than 110 direct jobs.

20.10.2022

Akzo Nobel N.V. publishes results for Q3 2022

Highlights Grow & Deliver (compared with Q3 2021)

  • Revenue up 19% and 14% higher in constant currencies1, pricing up 13%
  • ROS2 at 6.4% (2021: 10.0%), resulting from lower volumes and higher raw material and freight costs, as well as inflation on operating expenses
  • Adjusted EBITDA at €283 million (2021: €325 million)
  • Q4 2022 adjusted operating income expected below €150 million

Highlights Q3 2022 (compared with Q3 2021)

Highlights Grow & Deliver (compared with Q3 2021)

  • Revenue up 19% and 14% higher in constant currencies1, pricing up 13%
  • ROS2 at 6.4% (2021: 10.0%), resulting from lower volumes and higher raw material and freight costs, as well as inflation on operating expenses
  • Adjusted EBITDA at €283 million (2021: €325 million)
  • Q4 2022 adjusted operating income expected below €150 million

Highlights Q3 2022 (compared with Q3 2021)

  • Pricing up 13%, offsetting the increase of raw material and other variable costs. Volumes 5% lower, mainly due to destocking in the distribution channels in Decorative Paints in Europe and in Performance Coatings, as well as lower market demand in China
  • Operating income at €168 million (2021: €226 million), includes €16 million negative impact from Identified items (2021: €15 million net negative impact) and €17 million negative from the retrospective hyperinflation impact of the first half-year of 2022. OPI margin 5.9% (2021: 9.4%)
  • Adjusted operating income3 at €184 million (2021: €241 million); excluding the retrospective impact of hyperinflation accounting at €201 million
  • Net cash from operating activities decreased to an inflow of €126 million (2021: inflow of €290 million)
  • Net income attributable to shareholders at €84 million (2021: €164 million)
  • EPS from total operations at €0.48 (2021: €0.89); adjusted EPS from continuing operations at €0.57 (2021: €0.93)
  • Interim dividend of €0.44 per share (2021: €0.44 per share)

AkzoNobel CEO, Thierry Vanlancker, commented: “Our €201 million adjusted operating income excluding the retrospective impact of hyperinflation accounting bring our Q3 results in line with the market update issued at the end of September. Sharply increased macro-economic uncertainties negatively impacted consumer confidence. This resulted in destocking across several distribution channels in decorative paints Europe and performance coatings, while the market in China was impacted by the ongoing zero COVID-19 policy. Thanks to the strong commitment of our teams, we continue to offset the impact of raw material and freight cost inflation with pricing. We’ve now delivered cumulative pricing of 22% over the last two years. The macro-economic turbulence is expected to continue well into next year. We’ve therefore decided to suspend our targets for 2023 and will provide further guidance when announcing our full-year 2022 results. In the meantime, we will continue to focus on our margin management and cost reduction initiatives.”

Source:

AkzoNobel

19.10.2022

Kornit Digital issues Second-Annual Impact Report

Kornit Digital Ltd. unveiled its Impact Report for 2021 highlighting progress made against goals and further expanding its commitment to a long-term strategy designed to transform the world of fashion and textiles into one that is more sustainable. The comprehensive analysis details Kornit’s performance related to climate action, waste management, green chemistry, and diversity in the workplace, as well as other areas of the Company’s Environmental, Social, and corporate Governance (ESG) framework.

Key Accomplishments Against Baseline (2021)  
Kornit’s ongoing dedication to improving ESG practices within its own operations has resulted in Company-wide achievements in the areas of:

Climate Action and Waste Management*

  • ~16% reduction in GHG emissions intensity from x 9.11-e to 7.68 MTCO2-e
  • 39% reduction in hazardous waste intensity from 1.7 tons to 1.04 tons
  • 57% reduction in non-hazardous waste intensity from 33 tons to 14 tons

Green Chemistry

Kornit Digital Ltd. unveiled its Impact Report for 2021 highlighting progress made against goals and further expanding its commitment to a long-term strategy designed to transform the world of fashion and textiles into one that is more sustainable. The comprehensive analysis details Kornit’s performance related to climate action, waste management, green chemistry, and diversity in the workplace, as well as other areas of the Company’s Environmental, Social, and corporate Governance (ESG) framework.

Key Accomplishments Against Baseline (2021)  
Kornit’s ongoing dedication to improving ESG practices within its own operations has resulted in Company-wide achievements in the areas of:

Climate Action and Waste Management*

  • ~16% reduction in GHG emissions intensity from x 9.11-e to 7.68 MTCO2-e
  • 39% reduction in hazardous waste intensity from 1.7 tons to 1.04 tons
  • 57% reduction in non-hazardous waste intensity from 33 tons to 14 tons

Green Chemistry

  • Complete elimination of Acute Toxic Amines (CLP category 1, 2, 3) CMR
  • 20% reduction of VOC level in Robusto Inkset and 30% of VOC in Eco Ink/Green

DEI and Community Engagement

  • An increase in women in management, from 30% to 35%
  • Reporting 88% of employees feeling respected and free to be authentic at work - *Intensity measures are per $1 million of revenue.

Kornit Digital’s Impact Strategy
Propelled by an ambition to make a positive impact across all areas of its business and throughout the fashion and textile industries, Kornit further adjusted its Impact Strategy this year towards more expansive, longer-term goals and objectives. Kornit’s refined strategy reflects the Company's dual role as a change agent in the industry—both as a leader empowering the fashion industry to be more sustainable, and as an accountable participant responsible for embracing social and environmental change to make the world a better place.  
The holistic strategy accounts for both roles, across two fundamental pillars—"Enable the Change” and “Be the Change”—and incorporates both social and environmental KPIs designed to meet the Company’s goals and respond to stakeholders’ input, as well as industry and ecosystem needs

Kornit is officially unveiling the report during a press event at PRINTING United Expo 2022.

*Intensity measures are per $1 million of revenue.

Source:

Kornit Digital

(c) adidas AG
11.10.2022

adidas and SOUL CAP announce partnership to make swimming more accessible

  • The adidas x SOUL CAP partnership aims to promote greater diversity and inclusivity in the world of swimming, by helping to break down social barriers in the sport.
  • The debut swim cap has been designed for people with long or voluminous hair in a range of sizes, for adults and children, in an exclusive linen green colorway.

adidas announces its first swim cap made in partnership with London-based start-up SOUL CAP , which will be available from 26th September. This collaboration – which follows the launch of adidas’ full-cover and inclusive sizing swimwear ranges last summer – is part of the brand’s ongoing commitment to make water sports more accessible.

  • The adidas x SOUL CAP partnership aims to promote greater diversity and inclusivity in the world of swimming, by helping to break down social barriers in the sport.
  • The debut swim cap has been designed for people with long or voluminous hair in a range of sizes, for adults and children, in an exclusive linen green colorway.

adidas announces its first swim cap made in partnership with London-based start-up SOUL CAP , which will be available from 26th September. This collaboration – which follows the launch of adidas’ full-cover and inclusive sizing swimwear ranges last summer – is part of the brand’s ongoing commitment to make water sports more accessible.

The idea for SOUL CAP was born in 2017 when founders Michael Chapman and Toks Ahmed took up adult swimming lessons, after not having learned how to swim as children. They noticed a problem during their classes – every swimmer wore the same size swim cap, no matter what hairstyle they had, which often resulted in people struggling with ill-fitting caps. This observation led to them creating SOUL CAP, a company that makes swim caps designed for people with long or voluminous hair.

The adidas x SOUL CAP swim cap is made from 100 per cent silicone, which creates less snag on the hair ensuring a more comfortable fit. Built with extra space, it provides a snug fit and tight seal to keep long and voluminous hair dry and healthy through every type of swim. The collection consists of an adult cap in sizes Regular-XXL and a children’s cap in sizes Regular-L, in an exclusive linen green colorway.

More information:
adidas SOUL CAP Sportswear
Source:

adidas AG

(c) EURATEX
11.10.2022

EURATEX and ATP: 10th European Textile & Apparel Convention in Porto

On 13-14 October, EURATEX in partnership with ATP is organising the 10th European Textile & Apparel Convention in Porto, Portugal; the convention marks also the 24th Textile Industry Forum for Portugal.

The Porto Convention – titled Sustainability meets Competitiveness: How to Square the Circle? – will look at how companies can anticipate the new European regulatory framework, embrace innovation, and develop a business model where sustainability becomes a source of competitiveness and growth. In the current economic, social and political environment, Europe is facing many challenges: increased energy prices, unforeseen inflation and climate change, which add to the day-to-day challenges of running a business. Embracing the European Union’s commitment to a green and digital transformation, the textile industry needs to also move towards a new circular economy where recycling is at the core of the design process supported by digitalisation, innovation and new skills, and creativity. The conference will address explore solutions to turn quality and sustainability into a source of competitiveness.

On 13-14 October, EURATEX in partnership with ATP is organising the 10th European Textile & Apparel Convention in Porto, Portugal; the convention marks also the 24th Textile Industry Forum for Portugal.

The Porto Convention – titled Sustainability meets Competitiveness: How to Square the Circle? – will look at how companies can anticipate the new European regulatory framework, embrace innovation, and develop a business model where sustainability becomes a source of competitiveness and growth. In the current economic, social and political environment, Europe is facing many challenges: increased energy prices, unforeseen inflation and climate change, which add to the day-to-day challenges of running a business. Embracing the European Union’s commitment to a green and digital transformation, the textile industry needs to also move towards a new circular economy where recycling is at the core of the design process supported by digitalisation, innovation and new skills, and creativity. The conference will address explore solutions to turn quality and sustainability into a source of competitiveness.

The Porto Convention will see representatives of national and European institutions, experts from the industry and like-minded entrepreneurs come together to discuss ideas, share experiences and find solutions to face common challenges.

Source:

EURATEX

(c) Lenzing AG
03.10.2022

Lenzing: Ground-mounted photovoltaic system becomes operational

The Lenzing Group and VERBUND, an energy transition company, launched the first development stage of the largest ground-mounted photovoltaic system in Upper Austria. Together with its energy partner VERBUND, Lenzing is also paving the way for the transition to zero-emission mobility. The installation of electric vehicle charging infrastructure at the company’s premises underlines Lenzing’s commitment to the energy transition process.

The Lenzing Group and VERBUND, an energy transition company, launched the first development stage of the largest ground-mounted photovoltaic system in Upper Austria. Together with its energy partner VERBUND, Lenzing is also paving the way for the transition to zero-emission mobility. The installation of electric vehicle charging infrastructure at the company’s premises underlines Lenzing’s commitment to the energy transition process.

Thanks to the ground-mounted photovoltaic system at the “Ofenloch” landfill site, Lenzing, in conjunction with VERBUND, is consistently moving forward on the path to a carbon-free energy supply and has commissioned the first half of the new photovoltaic system with a peak power of 2,780 kWp. Full commissioning of the system with a peak power of 5,560 kWp is envisaged in mid-October. Annual electricity production will amount to 6,000,000 kWh, which is expected to cut CO2 emissions by some 4,400 tonnes per year. The Austrian pioneer in fiber production already commissioned three rooftop photovoltaic systems in spring/summer of 2022, with a peak power of 1,454 kWp and annual electricity production of some 1,508,000 kWh. The electricity flows directly into the company’s on-site production and will also power electric charging stations in future. In the first development stage, 16 wallboxes are set to be installed by the end of the year. A further 32 charging points are planned for 2023. The charging stations will be accessible to staff, visitors and the company’s own vehicle fleet.

“VERBUND’s photovoltaic operator model allows us to make the transition to solar power without incurring investment costs or risks. Thanks to the constant expansion in renewable energy, we remain on course to ecologize the value chain, while optimizing our carbon footprint, cutting costs and reducing the load on the grid, as we are using nearly 100 percent of photovoltaic power in our production,” explains Christian Skilich, Chief Pulp Officer of the Lenzing Group.

More information:
Lenzing energy consumption CO2
Source:

Lenzing AG

Stahl
19.09.2022

EcoVadis Platinum rating for Stahl

Stahl, an active proponent of responsible chemistry, has been awarded the highest EcoVadis Platinum rating, placing it within the top 1% of companies assessed by EcoVadis. The award underlines Stahl’s commitment to collaborating with its partners to reduce its environmental impact and build a more responsible and transparent supply chain.

Stahl, an active proponent of responsible chemistry, has been awarded the highest EcoVadis Platinum rating, placing it within the top 1% of companies assessed by EcoVadis. The award underlines Stahl’s commitment to collaborating with its partners to reduce its environmental impact and build a more responsible and transparent supply chain.

EcoVadis is a globally recognized evidence-based assessment platform that reviews the performance of more than 90,000 organizations across key sustainability criteria. These include environmental impact, labor and human rights standards, ethics, and sustainable procurement practices. The latest report from EcoVadis highlights Stahl’s positive progress across all these areas and builds on the Gold rating achieved by the company in 2021. Stahl’s 2030 target is to maintain the EcoVadis Platinum rating by working closely with its value-chain partners to help them reduce their environmental impact – including by supporting their transition to renewable feedstocks. In 2021, 80% of Stahl’s total spend on raw materials was supplied by EcoVadis-rated suppliers.
 
The new EcoVadis rating comes as Stahl accelerates its efforts to ensure a more responsible and transparent supply chain. Recent steps toward this goal have included establishing a dedicated Supply Chain Transparency division within the company’s Environmental, social, and governance (ESG) department. The division will be tasked with coordinating a new product development framework that prioritizes the responsible sourcing of raw materials. Furthermore, in July 2022, Stahl submitted a new greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction target, including a specific commitment regarding the company’s Scope 3 upstream emissions. Stahl aims to reduce these by at least 25% over the next 10 years, compared with the base year (2021). Stahl expects to achieve this reduction primarily by working with its suppliers to replace fossil-based raw materials with lower-carbon alternatives.

Source:

Stahl Holdings B.V.

15.09.2022

DyStar cautiously optimistic about the financial and environmental performance

  • Integrated Sustainability Report 2021 – 2022 published

DyStar, a leading specialty chemical company released its twelfth annual Sustainability Performance Report. The report is prepared in accordance with the updated GRI Standards 2021: Core option. DyStar continues to adopt the Integrated Reporting <IR> framework to communicate how the group has successfully created tangible value across multiple stakeholder groups in six major capitals.

DyStar reports that they have inched themselves closer to some of their 2025 target of reducing the environmental footprint by 30% for every ton of product, from 2011 levels. Here are some key highlights for FY2021:

  • Integrated Sustainability Report 2021 – 2022 published

DyStar, a leading specialty chemical company released its twelfth annual Sustainability Performance Report. The report is prepared in accordance with the updated GRI Standards 2021: Core option. DyStar continues to adopt the Integrated Reporting <IR> framework to communicate how the group has successfully created tangible value across multiple stakeholder groups in six major capitals.

DyStar reports that they have inched themselves closer to some of their 2025 target of reducing the environmental footprint by 30% for every ton of product, from 2011 levels. Here are some key highlights for FY2021:

  • Recorded more than 29% increase in revenue compared to 2020
  • Zero workplace fatalities, high-consequence injuries, and work-related ill health
  • 40% reduction in Greenhouse gas (GHG) emission intensity, compared to 2011
  • 37% decrease in wastewater emission intensity, compared to 2011

The Group was able to remain resilient and steer itself toward optimistic growth and recovery from the global pandemic in FY2021. In face of recent geopolitical events and macroeconomic factors such as soaring energy costs, DyStar and the wider supply chain will continue to face challenges. As a result, the company believes it is crucial to stay committed to their 2025 Sustainability goals to continue generating value for all stakeholders in the longer term, well beyond these turbulent times.

The report communicates DyStar’s progress towards its sustainability agenda and material topics. As part of our commitment to environmental sustainability, only an e-magazine and a PDF version will be made available for download from www.DyStar.com/sustainability-reports/

More information:
DyStar Sustainability Report
Source:

DyStar

08.09.2022

Monforts at ITMA ASIA + CITME

Monforts will highlight its technologies for special technical textile applications at this year’s ITMA ASIA + CITME which takes place at the National Exhibition and Convention Center in Shanghai, China, from November 20-24.

One of Monforts' developments is the Montex 8500 XXL stenter system for the production of technical fabrics in widths of up to 6.8 metres. Among the products made on this system are treated nonwovens for the geotextiles and filter media markets, tarpaulins, advertising banners, black-out curtains, membranes and many more.

On Montex©Coat coating lines, meanwhile, the possibilities range from the single-sided application of finishing agents for outdoor clothing and adding functionality to home textiles, to the creation of materials for sophisticated lightweight construction and automotive and aerospace components.

Monforts will highlight its technologies for special technical textile applications at this year’s ITMA ASIA + CITME which takes place at the National Exhibition and Convention Center in Shanghai, China, from November 20-24.

One of Monforts' developments is the Montex 8500 XXL stenter system for the production of technical fabrics in widths of up to 6.8 metres. Among the products made on this system are treated nonwovens for the geotextiles and filter media markets, tarpaulins, advertising banners, black-out curtains, membranes and many more.

On Montex©Coat coating lines, meanwhile, the possibilities range from the single-sided application of finishing agents for outdoor clothing and adding functionality to home textiles, to the creation of materials for sophisticated lightweight construction and automotive and aerospace components.

“Many more applications are possible, such as the overdyeing of denim, the creation of double-face coated materials, fabrics awnings, tents and medical drapes and the pre-treatment of substrates for digital printing”, explains Gunnar Meyer, Monforts area sales manager for China. “A range of different doctor blades and their combinations can be supplied to meet individual requirements, including air knife, roller knife, foam, screen and magnetic roller coating. The latter option is recommended for lines with working widths of over 2.4 metres.”

In addition, Monforts can provide the necessary explosion-proof ranges for solvent-based coatings and high temperature processes up to 320°C, such as the PTFE coating of nonwoven filter material. These lines are equipped with special burners, stenter chains, and insulation.

Source:

 A. Monforts Textilmaschinen GmbH & Co. KG / AWOL Media

07.09.2022

GFA launches new international edition of Global Fashion Summit in Singapore

Global Fashion Agenda (GFA) has launched a new international edition of Global Fashion Summit. Traditionally held in Copenhagen, the new edition in Singapore will further focus on the perspectives of manufacturers and supply chain partners to deeper understand how the industry can collaborate to reduce social and environmental impact in the entire value chain. Global Fashion Summit: Singapore Edition will take place on 3 November 2022 at Hilton Singapore Orchard.

Global Fashion Agenda (GFA) has launched a new international edition of Global Fashion Summit. Traditionally held in Copenhagen, the new edition in Singapore will further focus on the perspectives of manufacturers and supply chain partners to deeper understand how the industry can collaborate to reduce social and environmental impact in the entire value chain. Global Fashion Summit: Singapore Edition will take place on 3 November 2022 at Hilton Singapore Orchard.

The theme of Global Fashion Summit: Singapore Edition continues GFA’s focus on ‘Alliances For a New Era’. Under this theme, the Summit will call on the industry to accelerate change - encouraging more alliances between manufacturers, suppliers, investors, brands, NGOs, policymakers and more. It will also examine cross-industry alliances, in a bid to accelerate the transition to a net positive reality.
 
By bringing the forum to Asia, the new edition will include even more manufacturer and supply chain partner voices in the programme to discuss sustainability challenges, differences, and opportunities to collaborate with brand executives on equal terms. Plenary sessions will consider topics such as:

  • Renewable energy transformation – what does concrete transformation look like from tier 1-3 perspectives and what measures are needed to implement it?
  • Better wage systems – how can the industry establish fair compensation, underpinned by fair purchasing practices that will help end poverty for millions of garment workers?
  • Performance measurement – how can the industry accurately measure sustainability performance and tackle data credibility challenges?

Half of the programme will be dedicated to educational and action-oriented business case studies with options for direct interaction and live reactions. These will include tangible learnings and concrete recommendations to mobilise guests to take immediate action following the event.
 
The event will foster further collaboration across stakeholder groups through productive roundtable sessions that create an exchange of views among key decision makers in both the public and private sectors. These meetings will be designed and set up to drive commitments and new alliances for concrete action.

Source:

Global Fashion Agenda

(c) Textile Exchange
23.08.2022

The Ryan Young Climate+ Awards: Applications open by August 31

The second annual Ryan Young Climate+ Awards will take place this November 2022 at the annual Textile Exchange conference. Nominations are open until August 31, 2022.

The late Ryan Young, Textile Exchange COO from 2017-2020, is the inspiration behind Textile Exchange’s Climate+ Strategy, which is for the organization to serve as “a driving force for urgent climate action,” with a goal of 45% reduced CO2 emissions from textile fiber and material production by 2030. Ryan’s bold and courageous spirit defined what Textile Exchange and its members must do to tackle the climate crisis.

In honor of Ryan and his vision, TE will again be awarding Ryan Young Climate+ Awards to outstanding individuals and teams who show a clear commitment to the Climate+ vision along with other leadership traits.

Winners will be announced at the 2022 Textile Exchange Conference which will take place virtually and in person in Colorado Springs, U.S. from November 14-18, 2022.

The second annual Ryan Young Climate+ Awards will take place this November 2022 at the annual Textile Exchange conference. Nominations are open until August 31, 2022.

The late Ryan Young, Textile Exchange COO from 2017-2020, is the inspiration behind Textile Exchange’s Climate+ Strategy, which is for the organization to serve as “a driving force for urgent climate action,” with a goal of 45% reduced CO2 emissions from textile fiber and material production by 2030. Ryan’s bold and courageous spirit defined what Textile Exchange and its members must do to tackle the climate crisis.

In honor of Ryan and his vision, TE will again be awarding Ryan Young Climate+ Awards to outstanding individuals and teams who show a clear commitment to the Climate+ vision along with other leadership traits.

Winners will be announced at the 2022 Textile Exchange Conference which will take place virtually and in person in Colorado Springs, U.S. from November 14-18, 2022.

The 2022 award categories and criteriaare listed below:
Nominees may be brands, retailers, farmers and/or ranchers, and raw material suppliers.
Winners will receive one free full-access pass to attend the Conference (travel not included).

Three Ryan Young Climate+ Award Categories:

  1. Overall leadership – individual
  2. Overall leadership – team
  3. Rising star – individual with less than 5 years of industry experience

Award recipients will meet the following criteria:

  • Commitment to Climate+ – involved in accelerating Climate+ action in the apparel, textile, and footwear industry.
  • Collaboration – reflective of Ryan’s vision and determination to collaboratively move the industry forward.
  • Impact – driving innovative, scalable, transparent programs with measurable impact reduction and/or beneficial impacts on climate, water, soil health, and/or biodiversity at the raw materials level. Achievements/solutions are backed by trusted data and/or reporting.
  • Leadership and Inspiration – clearly demonstrating leadership and vision for industry climate solutions over the past year and beyond
Source:

Textile Exchange

Fashion Revolution
19.08.2022

Results of the FASHION TRANSPARENCY INDEX 2022

The world’s largest fashion brands and retailers must increase transparency to tackle the climate crisis and social inequality, according to the latest Fashion Transparency Index.

The seventh edition of the Fashion Transparency Index ranks 250 of the world’s largest fashion brands and retailers based on their public disclosure of human rights and environmental policies, practices, and impacts, across their operations and supply chains.

  • Brands achieved an average score of just 24%, with nearly a third of brands scoring less than 10%
  • The majority of brands (85%) do not disclose their annual production volumes despite mounting evidence of clothing waste around the world
  • Most major brands and retailers (96%) do not publish the number of workers in their supply chain paid a living wage

The Index reveals insights into the most pressing issues facing the fashion industry, like:

The world’s largest fashion brands and retailers must increase transparency to tackle the climate crisis and social inequality, according to the latest Fashion Transparency Index.

The seventh edition of the Fashion Transparency Index ranks 250 of the world’s largest fashion brands and retailers based on their public disclosure of human rights and environmental policies, practices, and impacts, across their operations and supply chains.

  • Brands achieved an average score of just 24%, with nearly a third of brands scoring less than 10%
  • The majority of brands (85%) do not disclose their annual production volumes despite mounting evidence of clothing waste around the world
  • Most major brands and retailers (96%) do not publish the number of workers in their supply chain paid a living wage

The Index reveals insights into the most pressing issues facing the fashion industry, like:

  • As new and proposed legislation focuses on greenwashing claims, almost half of major brands (45%) publish targets on sustainable materials yet only 37% provide information on what constitutes a sustainable material.
  • Only 24% of major brands disclose how they minimise the impacts of microfibres despite textiles being the largest source of microplastics in the ocean.
  • The vast majority of major brands and retailers (94%) do not disclose the number of workers in their supply chains who are paying recruitment fees. This paints an unclear picture of the risks of forced labour as workers may be getting into crippling debt to accept jobs paying poverty wages.
  • While many brands use their channels to talk about social justice, they need to go beyond lip service. Just 8% of brands publish their actions on racial and ethnic equality in their supply chains.

Despite these results, Fashion Revolution is encouraged by increasing supply chain transparency among many major brands, primarily with first-tier manufacturers where the final stage of production occurs, e.g. cutting, sewing, finishing and packing. Nine brands have disclosed their first-tier manufacturers for the first time this year. It is encouraging to see significant progress across market segments including luxury, sportswear, footwear and accessories and across different geographies.

Fashion Revolution’s co-founder and Global Operations Director Carry Somers says: “In 2016, only 5 out of 40 major brands (12.5%) disclosed their suppliers. Seven years later, 121 out of 250 major brands (48%) disclose their suppliers. This clearly demonstrates how the Index incentivises transparency but it also shows that brands really are listening to the millions of people around the world who keep asking them #WhoMadeMyClothes? Our power is in our persistence.”

More key findings from the Fashion Transparency Index 2022:

Progress on transparency in the global fashion industry is still too slow among 250 of the world’s largest fashion brands and retailers, with brands achieving an overall average score of just 24%, up 1% from last year
For another year, the initiative has seen major brands and retailers publicly disclose the most information about their policies, commitments and processes on human rights and environmental topics and significantly less about the results, outcomes and impacts of their efforts.

Most (85%) major brands still do not disclose their annual production volumes despite mounting evidence of overproduction and clothing waste
Thousands of tonnes of clothing waste are found globally. However, brands have disclosed more information about the circular solutions they are developing (28%) than on the actual volumes of pre- (10%) and post-production waste they produce (8%). Brands have sat by as waste importing countries foot the bill, resulting in serious human rights and environmental implications.

Just 11% of brands publish a responsible purchasing code of conduct indicating that most are still reluctant to disclose how their purchasing practices could be affecting suppliers and workers
Greater transparency on how brands interact with their suppliers ought to be a first step towards eliminating harmful practices and promoting fair purchasing practices. The poor performance on transparency in this vital area is a missed opportunity for brands to demonstrate they are serious about addressing the root causes of harmful working conditions, including the instances where they themselves are the key driver.

Despite the urgency of the climate crisis, less than a third of major brands disclose a decarbonisation target covering their entire supply chain which is verified by the Science-Based Targets Initiative
Many brands and retailers rely heavily on garment producing countries that are vulnerable to the impacts of the climate crisis, yet our research shows that only 29% of major brands and retailers publish a decarbonisation target covering their operations and supply chain which is verified by the Science Based Targets Initiative.

Only 11% of brands publish their supplier wastewater test results, despite the textile industry being a leading contributor to water pollution
The fashion industry is a major contributor to water pollution and one of the most water intensive industries on the planet. Only 11% of major brands publish their wastewater test result, and only 25% of brands disclose the process of conducting water-related risk assessments in their supply chain. Transparency on wastewater test results is key to ensuring that brands are held accountable for their potentially devastating impacts on local biodiversity, garment workers and their communities.

Most major brands and retailers (96%) do not publish the number of workers in their supply chain paid a living wage nor do they disclose if they isolate labour costs
Insufficient progress is being made by most brands towards ensuring that the workers in their supply chain are paid enough to cover their basic needs and put aside some discretionary income. Just 27% of brands disclose their approach to achieving living wages for supply chain workers and 96% do not publish the number of workers in their supply chain paid a living wage. In response, we have joined forces with allies across civil society to launch Good Clothes, Fair Pay. The campaign demands groundbreaking living wage legislation across the garment, textile and footwear sector.

 

Source:

Fashion Revolution

(c) adidas AG
01.08.2022

adidas unveils collection that celebrates community, heritage, and identity

adidas unveils the first of two drops with South African luxury designer, Thebe Magugu. The debut collection for women features the celebratory and joyful artwork of a woman dancing, designed in collaboration with artist Phathu Nembilwi, and influenced by Thebe’s mother, aunt and grandmother, and the theme of femininity, interwoven with leading adidas material technology . Each garment features an abstract selection of bright and punchy colors including, impact orange and yellow, accents of shock pink, backgrounded by pulse lilac. The collection spans across sports including running , swimming , training , tennis , football , and cycling alongside a set of casual lifestyle garments.  

United by a shared passion for inclusivity and kinship, the collection includes a three-piece modesty swimwear set made in part with recycled materials and chlorine resistant fabric that is lightweight and chlorine-resistant; swimwear in inclusive sizing (XS-4XL); and gender-neutral pieces with UNITEFIT – a fit system that is created with a spectrum of sizes, genders, and forms in mind.

adidas unveils the first of two drops with South African luxury designer, Thebe Magugu. The debut collection for women features the celebratory and joyful artwork of a woman dancing, designed in collaboration with artist Phathu Nembilwi, and influenced by Thebe’s mother, aunt and grandmother, and the theme of femininity, interwoven with leading adidas material technology . Each garment features an abstract selection of bright and punchy colors including, impact orange and yellow, accents of shock pink, backgrounded by pulse lilac. The collection spans across sports including running , swimming , training , tennis , football , and cycling alongside a set of casual lifestyle garments.  

United by a shared passion for inclusivity and kinship, the collection includes a three-piece modesty swimwear set made in part with recycled materials and chlorine resistant fabric that is lightweight and chlorine-resistant; swimwear in inclusive sizing (XS-4XL); and gender-neutral pieces with UNITEFIT – a fit system that is created with a spectrum of sizes, genders, and forms in mind.

The high-performance tennis pieces will be premiered during one of the most prominent hardcourt tournaments by adidas’ inspirational athletes Dana Mathewson, Stefanos Tsitsipas, Felix Auger Aliassime and Daria Kasatkina who are passionate about showing support for what matters and encouraging diversity and inclusivity on and off the court. The tennis collection features the Purple NY UNITEFIT Tennis Dress, delivering style and functionality, made in part with recycled materials.

Alongside the performance pieces, the statement Originals looks include the Originals Crop T-shirt, in white and semi pulse lilac, delivering classic streetwear style, and the Originals 7/8 Leggings, a go-to choice for every occasion. The collaboration also includes remixes of iconic adidas footwear silhouettes including the Stan Smith, Nizza Platform, Astir and Forum footwear, which feature design accents from Thebe Magugu's signature prints. Reflecting adidas's commitment to consciously crafting performance materials, hero styles and pieces have also been made in part with recycled materials, just one of the innovations that represent adidas' commitment to help end plastic waste. 

More information:
adidas Sportswear
Source:

adidas AG

28.07.2022

Lenzing partners with Red Points to fight counterfeits

  • Collaboration with Red Points addresses consumers’ increasing expectations on transparency and highlights Lenzing’s commitment to trademark protection
  • Protects interest of Lenzing customer and partners who are making real efforts to enhance the transparency of their value chains
  • Builds upon Lenzing’s overall brand protection efforts that verify the authenticity of fibers up to the end products

Lenzing Group, a global producer of wood-based specialty fibers, has announced a partnership with Red Points, a company in online IP infringement detection and removal, to strengthen Lenzing’s existing brand protection efforts globally and enable round-the-clock brand monitoring services. As Lenzing’s textile brands TENCEL™, LENZING™, ECOVERO™, as well as nonwovens brand VEOCEL™ continue to generate widespread demand from industry partners and customers worldwide, it is becoming increasingly important to protect the company’s trademarks and provide full visibility into the brands’ presence online.

  • Collaboration with Red Points addresses consumers’ increasing expectations on transparency and highlights Lenzing’s commitment to trademark protection
  • Protects interest of Lenzing customer and partners who are making real efforts to enhance the transparency of their value chains
  • Builds upon Lenzing’s overall brand protection efforts that verify the authenticity of fibers up to the end products

Lenzing Group, a global producer of wood-based specialty fibers, has announced a partnership with Red Points, a company in online IP infringement detection and removal, to strengthen Lenzing’s existing brand protection efforts globally and enable round-the-clock brand monitoring services. As Lenzing’s textile brands TENCEL™, LENZING™, ECOVERO™, as well as nonwovens brand VEOCEL™ continue to generate widespread demand from industry partners and customers worldwide, it is becoming increasingly important to protect the company’s trademarks and provide full visibility into the brands’ presence online.

Protecting the interest of Lenzing’s partners and consumers
Red Points provides the ideal technology solution to help Lenzing monitor and remove unauthorized use of its trademarks and counterfeits online. The technology works by using Artificial Intelligence (AI) to automatically detect intellectual property infringements of Lenzing’ trademarks with high accuracy and efficiency.

Brand protection is just one of Lenzing’s ongoing proactive measures aimed at enhancing transparency in the supply chain and protecting the interest of Lenzing’s partners by ensuring they are purchasing genuine Lenzing fibers which meet their high standards.

In 2018, Lenzing launched the Lenzing E-Branding Service which allows Lenzing’s customers, retailers and brand partners to effectively use trademarks in their marketing materials. The platform has been welcomed by partners globally as it continues to deliver value to the fashion, textile and nonwoven sectors by facilitating the traceability of Lenzing’s fibers and enabling customers to promote them effectively.

Source:

Lenzing AG

(c) Lindauer DORNIER GmbH
Maja Dornier (lhs) and Prof. Dr. Wolf Mutschler (rhs) hand over the Peter Dornier Foundation Award, endowed with 5,000 euros, to the award winner Dipl.-Ing. Mathis Bruns
26.07.2022

Peter Dornier Foundation Prize 2022 honours textile research on woven heart valve

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), cardiovascular disease is one of the most common natural causes of death. Every year, it is the cause of death of around 17 million people worldwide. The Peter Dornier Foundation Prize 2022 has now awarded a research work that is to improve the medical care of people with insufficient heart valve function in the future and prolong the patients' lives.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), cardiovascular disease is one of the most common natural causes of death. Every year, it is the cause of death of around 17 million people worldwide. The Peter Dornier Foundation Prize 2022 has now awarded a research work that is to improve the medical care of people with insufficient heart valve function in the future and prolong the patients' lives.

The human heart is a high-performance machine: over the course of a person's life, it beats almost three billion times, pumping around 200 million litres of blood through the body. Enormous stresses that can sometimes lead to life-threatening signs of wear and tear. If a heart valve gets out of step, patients usually get artificial-mechanical or biological valves as a replacement. However, mechanical solutions imply patients to take blood-thinning medication for the rest of their lives. In addition, there may be audible closing noises. For example, almost a quarter of patients with mechanical heart valves complain of sleep disturbances. Biological heart valves, on the other hand, such as those made from animal tissue, require a great deal of manual work and have a shorter lifetime.

Potential of weaving for medical products demonstrated
For this reason, Graduate Engineer Mathis Bruns at the Institute for Textile Machinery and High-Performance Textile Materials Technology (ITM) at the TU Dresden is researching an implant alternative made of fabric. As part of a research project that also involved heart surgeons from the Dresden Heart Centre and the University Hospital in Würzburg, Mr. Bruns provided important findings for weaving an artificial heart valve in his diploma thesis. For his work entitled "Development of tubular structures with integrated valve function", Mathis Bruns has now received the Peter Dornier Foundation Prize 2022, endowed with 5,000 euros. In his laudation, Dr. Adnan Wahhoud, former head of the development department of air-jet weaving machines at DORNIER in Lindau, said: "With his work, the winner of the award demonstrates very clearly the potential of weaving technology to produce fabrics of complex form, geometry and structure with the aim of prolonging and improving people's lives." The award-winning thesis enriches research into three-dimensional tissues for use in medicine.

Weaving replacement heart valves without seams
"A particular advantage of our approach is the integral production method", says foundation prize winner Mathis Bruns. “The geometry and function of a heart valve is that complex that woven heart valves could not be produced in this form previously. Through the combined use of a rigid rapier weaving machine with bobbin shield and a Jacquard machine, it is possible to weave the replacement heart valve in such a way that it no longer has be sewn together. Even the tubular structures for the blood vessels and the integrated valve function are ‘all of one piece’. Seams are always a weak point in textile medical products," Mr. Bruns adds. “Another advantage of the woven heart valve is the possibility to insert it by the help of minimally invasive surgery. Hence, the folded valve which is about the size of a tea light is to be pushed with a catheter via the bloodstream to the target position in the heart and unfolded there. The patient's chest and heart would then no longer have to be cut open”, explains prize winner Mr. Bruns.

Textile structure is similar to human tissue
A wide variety of medical products have always been produced on DORNIER weaving machines. Customers use them to produce fabrics for bandages, prostheses, blood filters and orthoses among other things. For Mathis Bruns, it is only evident that implants such as heart valves will more and more be woven on the machines from Lindau in the future. "Textile tissue is very similar to human tissue," he says. The human body consists largely of thread-like materials, just as a textile fabric is made up of thousands of individual threads. "Muscle fibres convey force impulses, nerve tracts send stimuli such as pain and brain cells convey information via thread-like dendrites and axons." Because of their ‘thread-like properties’, woven implants are therefore particularly suitable for medical applications.

(c) Archroma
20.07.2022

Archroma releases its Color Atlas online library for open access

Archroma, a leader in specialty chemicals towards sustainable solutions, announced that the 5’760 color references of its Color Atlas library will be available in ASE file format for open access to the users of most design software for fashion, apparel, and textiles. With this, designers and stylists are given open access to the largest library of colors for cotton and polyester.

ASE or .ase (for Adobe Swatch Exchange) files are used to upload, share and access colors through the swatch palette of design software such as Photoshop, Illustrator and most CAD (Computer-aided design) systems.

The Color Atlas by Archroma® was launched in 2016 to provide fashion designers and stylists with off-the-shelf color inspiration that can be implemented in production with just a few clicks.

The Color Atlas continues to evolve in line with Archroma’s commitment to sustainability through innovation. The company describes its approach as “The Archroma Way to a sustainable world: safe, efficient, enhanced, it’s our nature”.

Archroma, a leader in specialty chemicals towards sustainable solutions, announced that the 5’760 color references of its Color Atlas library will be available in ASE file format for open access to the users of most design software for fashion, apparel, and textiles. With this, designers and stylists are given open access to the largest library of colors for cotton and polyester.

ASE or .ase (for Adobe Swatch Exchange) files are used to upload, share and access colors through the swatch palette of design software such as Photoshop, Illustrator and most CAD (Computer-aided design) systems.

The Color Atlas by Archroma® was launched in 2016 to provide fashion designers and stylists with off-the-shelf color inspiration that can be implemented in production with just a few clicks.

The Color Atlas continues to evolve in line with Archroma’s commitment to sustainability through innovation. The company describes its approach as “The Archroma Way to a sustainable world: safe, efficient, enhanced, it’s our nature”.

All color references available in the Color Atlas have been formulated with products that comply with leading international eco-standards, and can be selected based on the desired sustainability profile.

Each color from the Color Atlas by Archroma® is available for purchase from Archroma as a physical color standard that includes precise digital data and access to global dyeing technical support.

Source:

Archroma / EMG

(c) adidas AG
20.07.2022

adidas Basketball announces the Candace Parker Collection Part II

adidas Basketball in collaboration with basketball GOAT and legend, Candace Parker , unveils the new Candace Parker Collection Part II with retail partner DICK’S Sporting Goods. Rooted in a shared commitment to empower aspiring women athletes and hoopers – who like Parker set out to create their own legacy, the encore collection is the embodiment of Parker’s evolution on-and-off the court melding Ace’s style and performance insights for the next generation player.

adidas Basketball in collaboration with basketball GOAT and legend, Candace Parker , unveils the new Candace Parker Collection Part II with retail partner DICK’S Sporting Goods. Rooted in a shared commitment to empower aspiring women athletes and hoopers – who like Parker set out to create their own legacy, the encore collection is the embodiment of Parker’s evolution on-and-off the court melding Ace’s style and performance insights for the next generation player.

The Candace Parker Collection Part II launches with the all-new Exhibit B, arriving in three custom colorways employing Lightstrike cushioning for fluid and dynamic handling. Each iteration of Parker's Exhibit Bs are inspired by her personal journey beginning with the “For Lailaa Nicole” receiving emerald green with silver accents in honor of her daughter. As for Parker, it’s not about “wearing the crown,” but about “sharing it” resulting in “Game Royalty”, a purple and gold colorway representing African queens followed by an ash blue and shadow navy for “Windy City” version signifying the hometown hero’s 2022 league title and rounded out by three unique Exhibit B “Elevated Team” colorways emphasizing the magic of teamwork.

The Candace Parker Collection Part II is an elevation for the new generation of athletes completed with a vibrant combination of pre to post-game apparel offerings including signature Ace sweatsuits, cropped jackets and hoodies, all paired with an assortment of tees and shorts that harken back to pivotal moments in Parker’s career. The return of inclusive sizing is paramount and purposeful, allowing Parker’s vision for expanded access to female and non-binary athletes who’ve traditionally had to size down to access men’s basketball apparel and footwear.

More information:
adidas Sportswear
Source:

adidas AG

05.07.2022

ITM 2022: Bringing Textile Technology Leaders together

ITM 2022 hosted textile technology leaders in Istanbul for 5 days, presenting the latest innovations in every field of textile from weaving, knitting, yarn, digital printing, finishing to denim. The ITM 2022 Exhibition, where a business volume of over 1.5 billion Euros was created in 5 days, accelerated the Turkish and world economy.

Organized by the partnership of Teknik Fairs Inc. and Tüyap Tüm Fuarcılık Yapım Inc., ITM 2022- International Textile Machinery Exhibition was held at Tüyap Fair and Congress Center between 14-18 June.  ITM 2022 Exhibition, attended by 1280 companies and company representatives from 65 countries, was visited by 64,500 people from 102 countries, consisting of 44% international and 56% domestic visitors.

ITM 2022 hosted textile technology leaders in Istanbul for 5 days, presenting the latest innovations in every field of textile from weaving, knitting, yarn, digital printing, finishing to denim. The ITM 2022 Exhibition, where a business volume of over 1.5 billion Euros was created in 5 days, accelerated the Turkish and world economy.

Organized by the partnership of Teknik Fairs Inc. and Tüyap Tüm Fuarcılık Yapım Inc., ITM 2022- International Textile Machinery Exhibition was held at Tüyap Fair and Congress Center between 14-18 June.  ITM 2022 Exhibition, attended by 1280 companies and company representatives from 65 countries, was visited by 64,500 people from 102 countries, consisting of 44% international and 56% domestic visitors.

Turkey became a Supply Center at the ITM 2022 Exhibition
The successful sales graph achieved at the ITM 2022 Exhibition proved that the difficulties experienced due to the pandemic for the last 3 years have been left behind. Turkey has become a supply center for European, Middle Eastern and African countries, especially with the disruption of the supply chain in Far East countries, including China. The profile of the professional visitors visiting the ITM 2022 Exhibition revealed that in the new world order that has shifted after the pandemic, the trade network has also changed hands and new players have appeared on the scene. The fact that manufacturers from all over the world such as Andorra, Angola, Honduras, Peru, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Brazil, Sri Lanka, Tanzania, Egypt, Iran, and Oman purchased a large number of machinery and signed collaborations at the ITM 2022 Exhibition has proven this.

Exhibitors of ITM 2022 enlarge their stands for ITM 2024
Many company officials, who stated that they have achieved a sales graphic far above their expectations starting from the very first day of the ITM 2022 Exhibition and that they have hosted visitors from all over the world, decided to enlarge their stands at the ITM 2024 Exhibition. During the exhibition, companies visited the registration application points and applied for ITM 2024 participation.

The next meeting of the ITM and HIGHTEX Exhibitions will be held in Istanbul between 4-8 June 2024.

Source:

ITM / Teknik Fairs INC.

05.07.2022

Stahl: Reduction of Scope 3 upstream emissions by at least 25%

Stahl, a proponent of responsible chemistry, is submitting a greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction target that is aligned with the most recent guidance provided by the Science Based Targets initiative (SBTi). The new target marks a key milestone on the company’s journey toward carbon neutrality.

Stahl’s SBTi submission includes a specific commitment regarding the company’s Scope 3 upstream emissions, which Stahl aims to reduce by at least 25% over the next 10 years, compared with the base year (2021). This reduction would primarily be achieved by Stahl replacing its fossil-based raw materials with lower-carbon alternatives. The target is a major step towards the objective of limiting global warming temperature increase to 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels by 2050, as agreed at the 2015 Paris Climate Accords.
 
Stahl’s extended commitment builds on the company’s existing targets to reduce its emission for Scopes 1 and 2, which were set shortly after the Paris Agreement in 2015. Stahl has since reduced its Scope 1 and 2 (direct) GHG emissions by more than 30%, thanks to operational efficiency gains and by decarbonizing its energy supply.

Stahl, a proponent of responsible chemistry, is submitting a greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction target that is aligned with the most recent guidance provided by the Science Based Targets initiative (SBTi). The new target marks a key milestone on the company’s journey toward carbon neutrality.

Stahl’s SBTi submission includes a specific commitment regarding the company’s Scope 3 upstream emissions, which Stahl aims to reduce by at least 25% over the next 10 years, compared with the base year (2021). This reduction would primarily be achieved by Stahl replacing its fossil-based raw materials with lower-carbon alternatives. The target is a major step towards the objective of limiting global warming temperature increase to 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels by 2050, as agreed at the 2015 Paris Climate Accords.
 
Stahl’s extended commitment builds on the company’s existing targets to reduce its emission for Scopes 1 and 2, which were set shortly after the Paris Agreement in 2015. Stahl has since reduced its Scope 1 and 2 (direct) GHG emissions by more than 30%, thanks to operational efficiency gains and by decarbonizing its energy supply.

Scope 3 GHG emissions cover all the additional indirect emissions that can occur in the value chain, including those associated with purchased raw materials, packaging, business travel, and transportation. Stahl’s Scope 3 emissions currently represent over 90% of its carbon footprint.

Source:

Stahl Holdings B.V.