From the Sector

Reset
927 results
(C) INDA
17.08.2022

RISE® – Research, Innovation & Science for Engineered Fabrics Conference in September

  • Focus on Rethinking, Reusing and Recycling Nonwovens this September
  • Industry Experts Present Material Science Innovations & Sustainability

More than 20 industry experts will present their views on how material science innovations can create a more sustainable future for the nonwovens industry at the Research, Innovation & Science for Engineered Fabrics (RISE®) Conference, Sept. 27-28 in Raleigh, at North Carolina State University, co-organized by INDA and The Nonwovens Institute at North Carolina State University.

Starting with responsible sourcing of nonwoven inputs to developing realistic end-of-life options and circularity opportunities, RISE will focus on rethinking, reusing and recycling nonwovens and engineered materials at the Talley Student Union in Raleigh.    

Participants will learn what’s coming next with sessions on the following six themes: Towards a More Circular Industry; Advancement in Sustainable Inputs; Development in Natural Fibers; Sustainable Inputs: Fibers and Biofibers; Waste Not, Want Not, Sustainable Inputs from Waste Products; and Economic Insights and Market Intelligence.

  • Focus on Rethinking, Reusing and Recycling Nonwovens this September
  • Industry Experts Present Material Science Innovations & Sustainability

More than 20 industry experts will present their views on how material science innovations can create a more sustainable future for the nonwovens industry at the Research, Innovation & Science for Engineered Fabrics (RISE®) Conference, Sept. 27-28 in Raleigh, at North Carolina State University, co-organized by INDA and The Nonwovens Institute at North Carolina State University.

Starting with responsible sourcing of nonwoven inputs to developing realistic end-of-life options and circularity opportunities, RISE will focus on rethinking, reusing and recycling nonwovens and engineered materials at the Talley Student Union in Raleigh.    

Participants will learn what’s coming next with sessions on the following six themes: Towards a More Circular Industry; Advancement in Sustainable Inputs; Development in Natural Fibers; Sustainable Inputs: Fibers and Biofibers; Waste Not, Want Not, Sustainable Inputs from Waste Products; and Economic Insights and Market Intelligence.

The 12th edition of RISE® will bring together thought leaders in product development, materials science, and new technologies to connect and convene for the industry’s premier nonwovens science and technology conference.

Expert speakers will address the latest trends and innovations around circularity – an important component of sustainability strategies that aims to return a product into the supply chain, instead of the landfill, after users are done consuming it.

RISE® session highlights include:

  • The Global Plastic Crisis: Who Will Be the Winners/Losers in The Marketplace?
    Bryan Haynes, Ph.D., Senior Technical Director, Global Nonwovens, Kimberly-Clark Corporation
  • Sustainable Fibers – Developments and the Future
    Jason Locklin, Ph.D., Director, University of Georgia, New Materials Institute and David Grewell, Ph.D., Center Director, Center for Bioplastics and Biocomposites
  • Thinking Differently: In a Changing World What’s Next for NatureWorks and Polylactic Acid Polymers (PLA)
    Liz Johnson, Ph.D., Vice President of Technology, NatureWorks LLC
  • PLA and PLA Blends: Practical Aspects of Extrusion
    Behnam Pourdeyhimi, Ph.D., William A. Klopman Distinguished Professor and Executive Director, The Nonwovens Institute, North Carolina State University
  • Hemp is Strong – Are You?
    Olaf Isele, Strategic Product Development Director, Trace Femcare, Inc.
  • Exploring Natural Fibers in Nonwovens
    Paul Latten, Director of Research and Development & New Business, Southeast Nonwovens, Inc.
  • Potential Nonwoven Applications of Tree-Free Fibers Made from Microbial Cellulose –
    Heidi Beatty, Chief Executive Officer, Crown Abbey, LLC
  • Ultra Fine Fibers Made from Recycled Materials
    Takashi Owada, General Manager, Teijin Frontier (U.S.A.), Inc.

The event also will feature the presentation of the RISE® Innovation Award, a special opportunity to tour the Nonwovens Institute’s state-of-the-art facilities with advance registration required, and poster presentations by North Carolina State University graduate students.

Source:

INDA, Association of the Nonwoven Fabrics Industry

16.08.2022

CHT Gruppe veröffentlicht Nachhaltigkeitsbericht 2021

Im Fokus stehen die Personalentwicklung, der Energie- und Wasserverbrauch sowie die unternehmensweiten Emissionen und das Abfallverhalten sowie der Umgang mit zukünftigen Herausforderungen. CHT stellt in dem Bericht gruppenweite Vorhaben zum Klimaschutz sowie nachhaltige Produkte und Lösungen vor. Der Bericht ist nach den GRI-Standards der Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) auf Basis der Kern-Option erstellt worden.

Mit dem „Green Deal“ verfolgt die EU-Kommission ehrgeizige Klimaziele, an deren Umsetzung sich die CHT Gruppe im Rahmen der VCI-Initiative „chemistry4climate“ beteiligt.
Die Unternehmensgruppe hat das Ziel, bis 2045 klimaneutral zu werden. Zur Untermauerung dieses Vorhabens hat die CHT Gruppe Ende 2021 die Science Based Targets initiative (SBTi) zur Einhaltung der Ziele des Pariser Klimaabkommens gezeichnet und sich zum 1,5°C-Ziel bekannt.
Für 2021 wurde die erste Klimabilanz (Scope 1+2) für die CHT Gruppe erstellt, die nun als Basis für die Reduktionsziele der Treibhausgasemissionen gilt.

Im Fokus stehen die Personalentwicklung, der Energie- und Wasserverbrauch sowie die unternehmensweiten Emissionen und das Abfallverhalten sowie der Umgang mit zukünftigen Herausforderungen. CHT stellt in dem Bericht gruppenweite Vorhaben zum Klimaschutz sowie nachhaltige Produkte und Lösungen vor. Der Bericht ist nach den GRI-Standards der Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) auf Basis der Kern-Option erstellt worden.

Mit dem „Green Deal“ verfolgt die EU-Kommission ehrgeizige Klimaziele, an deren Umsetzung sich die CHT Gruppe im Rahmen der VCI-Initiative „chemistry4climate“ beteiligt.
Die Unternehmensgruppe hat das Ziel, bis 2045 klimaneutral zu werden. Zur Untermauerung dieses Vorhabens hat die CHT Gruppe Ende 2021 die Science Based Targets initiative (SBTi) zur Einhaltung der Ziele des Pariser Klimaabkommens gezeichnet und sich zum 1,5°C-Ziel bekannt.
Für 2021 wurde die erste Klimabilanz (Scope 1+2) für die CHT Gruppe erstellt, die nun als Basis für die Reduktionsziele der Treibhausgasemissionen gilt.

Der Umsatz der CHT Gruppe wurde 2021 zu 65% mit nachhaltigen Produkten erwirtschaftet. Hierfür wurden über 88% des strategischen Rohstoffvolumens von Lieferanten bezogen, die als nachhaltig eingestuft sind.

Darüber hinaus interessant sind Konzepte und darauf abgestimmte Hilfsmittel, mit denen sich für verschiedene textile Anwendungsfelder Energie- und Ressourceneinsparungen umsetzen lassen. Sie belegen die Anstrengungen zur Erreichung der eigenen nachhaltigen und strategischen Ziele, die sich von den Entwicklungsziele der Vereinten Nationen (SDGs) ableiten.

Source:

CHT Group

Foto: Unplash
10.08.2022

High-tech center for cotton processing and fiber-to-fiber recycling being built in Africa

IFFAC (Impact Fund for African Creatives) has revealed plans which will revolutionise West African textile and garment production at one stroke. The fund is converting a partially disused textile mill in the region into a hi-tech centre for processing local cotton and recycling waste fabric, to produce both fabric for further processing and new clothes. The mill will be equipped with modern equipment, all sustainably powered by hydroelectricity from the nearby Volta Dam.

West Africa grows about 6% of the world’s cotton but only a tiny fraction of that crop is processed on the continent, the vast majority being shipped thousands of miles to Asia before being shipped back again as finished or part-finished fabrics. The mill project will end the continent’s reliance on such an unsustainable practice with all the obvious financial and environmental benefits.

IFFAC (Impact Fund for African Creatives) has revealed plans which will revolutionise West African textile and garment production at one stroke. The fund is converting a partially disused textile mill in the region into a hi-tech centre for processing local cotton and recycling waste fabric, to produce both fabric for further processing and new clothes. The mill will be equipped with modern equipment, all sustainably powered by hydroelectricity from the nearby Volta Dam.

West Africa grows about 6% of the world’s cotton but only a tiny fraction of that crop is processed on the continent, the vast majority being shipped thousands of miles to Asia before being shipped back again as finished or part-finished fabrics. The mill project will end the continent’s reliance on such an unsustainable practice with all the obvious financial and environmental benefits.

As well as producing fabric from sustainably grown virgin cotton, a joint venture with Shandong-based WOL Textiles Ltd., a privately owned plant that has long supplied the African market, the mill will be home to a state-of-the-art shredding and recycling facility, a joint venture between IFFAC and the Dutch Circularity B.V. CEO Han Hamers of Circularity B.V. in The Netherlands, has been involved in the production of 100% circular knit and woven articles.

The mill project is expected to create over a thousand jobs. The surrounding area already boasts a significant number of experienced textile workers ready to be retrained on the new equipment. While the majority of the products created will be sold within the region, all processes will confirm to new EU Supply Chain Law to allow for the possibility of export.  

Output is forecast at six million pieces of finished clothing and twenty-five million metres of spun and woven cloth per year. In total, thirty million US$ of investment will be made in the site with operations ready to begin next year (2023).

More information:
IFFAC Africa Recycling
Source:

Circularity Germany GmbH i.G.

10.08.2022

Launch of international in-store collection program at Mustang

Today’s system of «take – make – waste» needs to change. New textiles are produced used and discarded instead of putting them to a second use. The production of new textiles requires natural resources that are limited, and the current system has a significant negative impact on our planet. The transition to a circular system, where garments are kept in use for longer, is an opportunity to harness untapped potential around customer loyalty, economic growth, and ecological sustainability.

To move away from the linear system and enable products to be made out of post-consumer textile waste, TEXAID continues to expand its offering for in-store collection programs throughout Europe and the USA.

TEXAID is partnering with Mustang to offer an in-store collection program. At scale and paired with TEXAID, in-store collection of used clothing enables conservation of resources because it allows items to be directly sorted for their next and most environmentally friendly lifecycle. This service can now be found in over 70 Mustang stores across Germany, Austria, Belgium, Switzerland, Czech Republic, France, Hungary, the Netherlands, and Poland.

Today’s system of «take – make – waste» needs to change. New textiles are produced used and discarded instead of putting them to a second use. The production of new textiles requires natural resources that are limited, and the current system has a significant negative impact on our planet. The transition to a circular system, where garments are kept in use for longer, is an opportunity to harness untapped potential around customer loyalty, economic growth, and ecological sustainability.

To move away from the linear system and enable products to be made out of post-consumer textile waste, TEXAID continues to expand its offering for in-store collection programs throughout Europe and the USA.

TEXAID is partnering with Mustang to offer an in-store collection program. At scale and paired with TEXAID, in-store collection of used clothing enables conservation of resources because it allows items to be directly sorted for their next and most environmentally friendly lifecycle. This service can now be found in over 70 Mustang stores across Germany, Austria, Belgium, Switzerland, Czech Republic, France, Hungary, the Netherlands, and Poland.

More information:
Texaid Mustang circularity
Source:

TEXAID

10.08.2022

Weitblick nutzt retraced für Lieferkettentransparenz

Die Plattform für nachhaltiges Lieferkettenmanagement in der Modeindustrie retraced dient der Erfassung, Auswertung und Verwaltung von Daten der Lieferkette. Die Plattform vernetzt die an einer Bekleidungsherstellung beteiligten Parteien und sorgt für digitalisierte und effiziente Kommunikation. Dadurch können Unternehmen zusammenarbeiten, sich einen klaren Überblick über ihre Lieferketten verschaffen und Rohstoffe bis zu ihrem Ursprung zurückverfolgen. Risiken können antizipiert und ihre Lieferketten im Hinblick auf soziale und ökologische Aspekte optimiert werden. So können beispielsweise die gesetzlichen Vorgaben wie das deutsche Lieferkettensorgfaltspflichtengesetz erfüllt werden.

Die Plattform für nachhaltiges Lieferkettenmanagement in der Modeindustrie retraced dient der Erfassung, Auswertung und Verwaltung von Daten der Lieferkette. Die Plattform vernetzt die an einer Bekleidungsherstellung beteiligten Parteien und sorgt für digitalisierte und effiziente Kommunikation. Dadurch können Unternehmen zusammenarbeiten, sich einen klaren Überblick über ihre Lieferketten verschaffen und Rohstoffe bis zu ihrem Ursprung zurückverfolgen. Risiken können antizipiert und ihre Lieferketten im Hinblick auf soziale und ökologische Aspekte optimiert werden. So können beispielsweise die gesetzlichen Vorgaben wie das deutsche Lieferkettensorgfaltspflichtengesetz erfüllt werden.

Um sein Nachhaltigkeitsmanagement zielgerichtet zu stärken und für maximale Transparenz zu sorgen, hat sich der Workwear-Produzent Weitblick für die Zusammenarbeit mit retraced entschieden. Die Transparenztechnologie liefert auch in Bezug auf die Kundenkommunikation Weitblick wertvolle Details und Informationen, die positiven Einfluss auf die Kaufentscheidung nehmen können. Die Bereitschaft bei Weitblick, sich aktiv für die Erfüllung der ethischen Pflichten und Nachhaltigkeitsziele einzusetzen, besteht bereits seit langem und zeigt sich auch in zahlreichen Zertifizierungen und Mitgliedschaften wie beispielsweise dem Textilbündnis und dem Grünen Knopf.

Source:

WEITBLICK® GmbH & Co. KG

10.08.2022

Bluesign defines “sustainable attributes” for approved chemicals

By defining “sustainable attributes” for bluesign® APPROVED chemicals registered in the bluesign® FINDER, Bluesign is furthering its ability to provide more sustainable solutions by providing specified search functions to help chemical suppliers and the textile industry make better informed decisions. The bluesign® FINDER is a web-based, advanced search engine for manufacturers. It contains a positive list of preferred chemical products. Today more than 20,000 bluesign® APPROVED chemical products are registered in the bluesign® FINDER.

Bluesign® APPROVED chemical products meet the stringent bluesign® CRITERIA for chemical assessment. That means that the approved chemicals are produced following occupational health and safety (OH&S) practices with less environmental impact and excellent Product Stewardship following the principles of Input Stream Management and sustainable chemistry.

By defining “sustainable attributes” for bluesign® APPROVED chemicals registered in the bluesign® FINDER, Bluesign is furthering its ability to provide more sustainable solutions by providing specified search functions to help chemical suppliers and the textile industry make better informed decisions. The bluesign® FINDER is a web-based, advanced search engine for manufacturers. It contains a positive list of preferred chemical products. Today more than 20,000 bluesign® APPROVED chemical products are registered in the bluesign® FINDER.

Bluesign® APPROVED chemical products meet the stringent bluesign® CRITERIA for chemical assessment. That means that the approved chemicals are produced following occupational health and safety (OH&S) practices with less environmental impact and excellent Product Stewardship following the principles of Input Stream Management and sustainable chemistry.

In addition to the existing functions within the bluesign® FINDER, bluesign® SYSTEM PARTNER chemical suppliers can claim selected sustainability attributes for their bluesign® APPROVED chemical products that will be displayed within the bluesign® FINDER. Sustainability claims will be verified by Bluesign during on-site assessments and through chemical assessments. Requirements and data provisions will be laid out in the criteria: bluesign® CRITERIA for chemical assessment ANNEX: Sustainability attributes for bluesign® APPROVED chemical products.

The bluesign® FINDER will be amended with search functions starting this year with the below first priority attributes:

  1. Renewable feedstock (biomass* or bio-based)
    The sustainability attribute ‘Renewable feedstock (biomass or bio-based)’ is intended for use with any chemical product that contains at least 20% biomass content by weight in the form of biomass-derived carbon.
  2. Sustainably sourced renewable feedstock (biomass* or bio-based)
    The sustainability attribute ‘sustainably sourced renewable feedstock (biomass or bio-based)’ is intended for use with any chemical product that contains at least 20% biomass content by weight in the form of biomass-derived carbon. The biomass content shall originate from land that is certified sustainable.
  3. Recycled content
    The sustainability attribute ‘Recycled content’ is intended for use with any chemical product that contains at least 20% recycled content by weight. For the calculation of the recycled content only the dry content of the chemical product shall be regarded, excluding water.
More information:
bluesign chemicals Sustainability
Source:

Bluesign

09.08.2022

Carbios joined WhiteCycle to process and recycle plastic textile waste

  • An innovative European project to process and recycle plastic textile waste
  • A partnership to reach the objectives set by the European Union in reducing CO2 emissions by 2030
  • A unique consortium rallying 16 public and private European organizations working together for more circular economy

Carbios joined WhiteCycle, a project coordinated by Michelin, which was launched in July 2022. Its main goal is to develop a circular solution to convert complex[1] waste containing textile made of plastic into products with high added value. Co-funded by Horizon Europe, the European Union’s research and innovation program, this unprecedented public/private European partnership includes 16 organizations and will run for four years.
 

  • An innovative European project to process and recycle plastic textile waste
  • A partnership to reach the objectives set by the European Union in reducing CO2 emissions by 2030
  • A unique consortium rallying 16 public and private European organizations working together for more circular economy

Carbios joined WhiteCycle, a project coordinated by Michelin, which was launched in July 2022. Its main goal is to develop a circular solution to convert complex[1] waste containing textile made of plastic into products with high added value. Co-funded by Horizon Europe, the European Union’s research and innovation program, this unprecedented public/private European partnership includes 16 organizations and will run for four years.
 
WhiteCycle envisions that by 2030 the uptake and deployment of its circular solution will lead to the annual recycling of more than 2 million tons of the third most widely used plastic in the world, PET[2]. This project should prevent landfilling or incineration of more than 1.8 million tons of that plastic each year. Also, it should enable reduction of CO2 emissions by around 2 million tons.
 
Complex waste containing textile (PET) from end-of-life tyres, hoses and multilayer clothes are currently difficult to recycle, but could soon become recyclable thanks to the project outcomes. Raw material from PET plastic waste could go back into creation of high-performance products, through a circular and viable value chain.
 
Public and private European organizations are combining their scientific and industrial expertises:

  • industrial partners (Michelin, Mandals, KORDSA);
  • cross-sector partnership (Inditex)
  • waste management companies (Synergies TLC, ESTATO);
  • intelligent monitoring systems for sorting (IRIS);
  • biological recycling SME (Carbios);
  • product life cycle analysis company (IPOINT);
  • university, expert in FAIR data management (HVL);
  • universities, research and technology organizations (PPRIME – Université de Poitiers/CNRS, DITF, IFTH, ERASME);
  • industry cluster (Axelera);
  • project management consulting company (Dynergie).

 
The consortium will develop new processes required throughout the industrial value chain:

  • Innovative sorting technologies, to enable significant increase of the PET plastic content of complex waste streams in order to better process them;
  • A pre-treatment for recuperated PET plastic content, followed by a breakthrough recycling enzyme-based process to decompose it into pure monomers in a sustainable way;
  • Repolymerization of the recycled monomers into like new plastic;
  • Fabrication and quality verification of the new products made of recycled plastic materials

 
WhiteCycle has a global budget of nearly 9.6 million euros and receives European funding in the amount of nearly 7.1 million euros. The consortium’s partners are based in five countries (France, Spain, Germany, Norway and Turkey). Coordinated by Michelin, it has an effective governance system involving a steering committee, an advisory board and a technical support committee.

[1] Complex waste: multi materials waste (Rubber goods composites and multi-layer textile)
[2] PET: Polyethylene terephthalate

Source:

Carbios

Die Kollektion „SINFUL“ wurde von Nicole Juhlke entworfen. Foto Hochschule Niederrhein: Die Kollektion „SINFUL“ wurde von Nicole Juhlke entworfen.
Die Kollektion „SINFUL“ wurde von Nicole Juhlke entworfen.
08.08.2022

Graduierte der Hochschule Niederrhein auf der Neo.Fashion in Berlin

Der Fachbereich Textil- und Bekleidungstechnik der Hochschule Niederrhein (HSNR) ist mit zehn Graduierten auf der Neo.Fashion (6. bis 8. September) im Rahmen der Berlin Fashion Week vertreten. Bei der Neo.Fashion stehen Nachwuchskräfte aus den Bereichen Mode- und Textildesign im Mittelpunkt.

Der Fachbereich Textil- und Bekleidungstechnik der Hochschule Niederrhein (HSNR) ist mit zehn Graduierten auf der Neo.Fashion (6. bis 8. September) im Rahmen der Berlin Fashion Week vertreten. Bei der Neo.Fashion stehen Nachwuchskräfte aus den Bereichen Mode- und Textildesign im Mittelpunkt.

Die HSNR-Absolventinnen und Absolventen zeigen innovative, diverse und nachhaltige Kollektionen. Als Design-Ingenieure und Masterstudierende sind sie nicht nur in der Lage ästhetisch schöne Bekleidung und Textilien zu entwickeln; die Ausbildung in den Ingenieursfächern und die Nutzungsmöglichkeit der 32 Labore an der Hochschule versetzen sie vielmehr in die Lage, von der Faser bis zum fertigen Produkt ihre Kollektionen entlang der gesamten textilen Kette zu gestalten. Das beinhaltet die Flächen- und Formgestaltung an hochmodernen Strickmaschinen genauso wie das Erarbeiten von gedruckten und gelaserten Flächen und die Fertigung mit moderner Ultraschalltechnologie.  

Ihre Themenstellung und Inspiration für die Kollektion „Melt Down“ findet Antonia Dannenberg im Klimawandel. Übertragen auf sechs Outfits wird die desaströse Entwicklung des weltweiten Gletscherschmelzens in Folge der Erderwärmung visualisiert.

Anne-Sophie Haupt hat sich von dem portugiesischen Eco Street Artist Vhils inspirieren lassen, der ausschließlich mit bereits existierendem Material arbeitet und durch die Technik des Abtragens neue Motive erzeugt. Die Design-Ingenieurin übersetzt diese Arbeitsweisen textil, in ihrer Bachelorarbeit „Subversive“, mit der Umgestaltung von Brautmode zu Streetwear.

Die Abschlussarbeit von Lion Busch „Constricted“ befasst sich mit der japanischen Färbetechnik Shibori. Im Fokus steht die Re-Interpretation des traditionellen Handwerks und die Frage, wie sich Färbeprozesse nachhaltig und innovativ gestalten lassen.

„SINFUL“ ist der englische Begriff für sündig und der gleichnamige Titel der Bachelorarbeit von Nicole Juhlke. Mittels Gestaltungselementen wie Formen, Farben und Strukturen wird versucht Emotionen darzustellen und zum Nachdenken anzuregen.

Das Designer-Duo Anna-Lena Sander und Laura Cholewa stellte sich die Frage: Gefühle und Emotionen unterdrücken? Wieso nicht einfach mit dem täglichen Outfit zeigen, was in einem vorgeht. Seine eigene Welt erschaffen und Gefühlszustände nach außen offenbaren. Ihr Konzept besteht aus der Tag-Kollektion „LucidDreams“ und der Nacht-Kollektion „NightVision“.

Burak Germiyanoglu möchte mit seiner Kollektion „Heritage“ die in Vergessenheit geratene Tradition der türkischen Heimat seiner Eltern wiederaufleben lassen. Er hat dabei nicht die traditionellen Trachten reproduziert, sondern Elemente dieser mit westlichen Bekleidungsformen fusioniert, so dass neue innovative Entwürfe, mit der Essenz der traditionell türkischen Bekleidung entstanden.

Nadine Gottwald möchte mit ihrer Arbeit der Vielfalt einer offen gelebten Geschlechterzugehörigkeit etwas Verbindendes geben. Sie schaffte mit „To appear as we please“ eine Modekollektion fernab stereotypischer Farb- und Formgebung. Eine Mode, die das Augenmerk nicht gleich auf die geschlechtliche Zugehörigkeit richtet, sondern frei macht von tradierten Vorstellungen und Diversität verkörpert.

Die Kollektion „un//used“ von Franziska Jauch ist das Ergebnis eines Alternativ-Konzeptes zur herkömmlichen Jeans-Herstellung. Der nachhaltige Kern der Idee: Den Used Look durch Digitaldruck anstatt durch chemische oder mechanische Behandlung zu realisieren.

Gabriela Lopes transferiert in ihrer Kollektion „MOTIRÕ“ die grafische Kunst der Urbevölkerung ihrer brasilianischen Heimat in moderne Strickoutfits. Die in Zusammenarbeit mit der indigenen Bevölkerung ausgewählten Formen und Farben sollen als Statement die Forderungen der Urbewohner unterstützen, ein politisches Zeichen setzen und die internationale Sichtbarkeit ihres Anliegens ermöglichen.

 

Source:

Hochschule Niederrhein

03.08.2022

Sustainable Developments in Absorbent Hygiene & Personal Care at Hygienix™

  • INDA Announces Full Program and Opens Registration for Premier Event in New Orleans

With reusable and recyclable products and new inputs offering growth opportunities in absorbent hygiene and personal care products, Hygienix™ will provide an insightful view into the market’s future this November in New Orleans.

Industry participants from around the world and throughout the supply chain will convene and connect for the eighth edition of the premier event for the fast-growing segment on November 14-17, at The Roosevelt New Orleans Hotel.

The in-person conference will highlight the segment’s continued growth and new opportunities with presentations by more than 20 industry experts on sustainable inputs, natural fibers, product transparency, reusable menstrual products, recyclable diapers and more as well as the latest market forecasts and insights into consumer buying trends.

  • INDA Announces Full Program and Opens Registration for Premier Event in New Orleans

With reusable and recyclable products and new inputs offering growth opportunities in absorbent hygiene and personal care products, Hygienix™ will provide an insightful view into the market’s future this November in New Orleans.

Industry participants from around the world and throughout the supply chain will convene and connect for the eighth edition of the premier event for the fast-growing segment on November 14-17, at The Roosevelt New Orleans Hotel.

The in-person conference will highlight the segment’s continued growth and new opportunities with presentations by more than 20 industry experts on sustainable inputs, natural fibers, product transparency, reusable menstrual products, recyclable diapers and more as well as the latest market forecasts and insights into consumer buying trends.

Hygienix also will offer two specialized workshops, and a myriad of business connection opportunities including a welcome reception on Nov. 14 and a first-time attendee mentorship program.
Participants will discover innovative products in absorbent hygiene and personal care at tabletop exhibits with evening receptions on Nov. 15-16, providing opportunities for 60 companies to showcase their unique offerings.

Three finalists will each present their innovative and technically sophisticated disposable absorbent hygiene products as they vie for the prestigious Hygienix Innovation Award™. Nominations are open until August 29. Demonstrating the interest in sustainability, last year’s award recipient was Kudos Diaper Subscription featuring its 100% cotton disposable diaper.

Hygienix Highlights
Absorbent hygiene – the single largest nonwoven end‐use category (by square meters) – is expected to continue its strong growth over the next four years, creating market opportunities in this thriving area driven by growing consumer interest for environmentally-friendly options in material inputs and end-of-life options.

Participants will hear the latest data and forecasts from analysts during presentations by Robert Fry, Jr., Ph.D., Principal of Robert Fry Economics LLC on the Global Economy – What we Can Expect in 2023; Pricie Hanna, Managing Partner, and Colin Hanna, Director of Market Research, Price Hanna Consultants on Disposables versus Reusables; and Simon Preisler, Vice President of Logistics, Central National Gottesman delivering a Logistic Market Update.

A panel of entrepreneurs will discuss the challenges, biases and taboos to bringing innovations into the marketplace. Experts sharing their insights will be Mia Abbruzzese and Alexandra Fennell, co-founders of Grace; Amrita Saigal, founder and CEO, Kudos; and Cindy Santa Cruz, President of ParaPatch.

A session on Next-Generation Menstrual Products and their Users will feature Liying Qian, Research Analyst, Euromonitor International providing market data on disposable and reusable period products; Frantisek Riha-Scott, Founder, Confitex discussing reusable products; and Greta Meyer, Co-Founder and CEO, Sequel on Reengineering the Tampon.
Also focusing on period products will be a presentation by Danielle Keiser, Managing Director, Impact, Madami on Changing the Conversation with Consumersmoderated by Heidi Beatty, Chief Executive Officer, Crown Abbey, LLC.

Other intriguing not-to-be-missed presentations centered on sustainability trends include:

  • Assessing Sustainable Fiber Options in the Context of Disposable Hygienic Products – Richard Knowlson, Principal, RPK Consulting LLC
  • Five Generations of Hygiene + Sustainability – Matt Schiering, Professor of Marketing, Dominican University
  • Recycling Approaches for Disposable Diaper Waste – Jeannine Cardin, Quality and R&D, RecycPHP Inc.

Hygienix will provide additional focused learning opportunities with two essential short courses (with separation registration fees) on Nov. 14 focused on Absorption Systems for Absorbent Hygiene Products, from 1 to 3:30 p.m. and Global Diaper Trends from 3:45 to 6 p.m.

More information:
Hygienix INDA
Source:

INDA

03.08.2022

17. Chemnitzer Textiltechnik-Tagung (CTT) am 28. + 29. September

Unter dem Motto „Textiltechnik als Schlüsseltechnologie der Zukunft“ informieren sich Maschinenproduzenten, Anwender, Textilfachleute und Forschende über neueste Entwicklungen in den Themenbereichen:

  • Ressourceneffiziente und nachhaltige Prozesse
  • Textiltechnologien für den Leichtbau
  • Digitalisierung in der textilen Produktion
  • Additive Fertigung mit Fasern und Textilien

Das Format bietet neben klassischen Vorträgen im Plenarteil und vier Themenkomplexen auch Pitches sowie studentische und wissenschaftliche Projektvorstellungen bzw. Exponate-Präsentationen.

Im Plenarteil der Veranstaltung werden der europäische GFK-Markt vorgestellt und die Bedeutung des Mittelstandes für die deutsche Volkswirtschaft näher beleuchtet.

Ausgewählte technologische Highlights der Fachvorträge in diesem Jahr sind neuartige Verfahren zum 3D-Druck, innovative Carbon-Textilien für die Betonarmierung sowie neue Digitalisierungsstrategien für den Maschinenbau und die Textilindustrie.

Kooperationspartner der diesjährigen Veranstaltung sind das tschechische Generalkonsulat und tschechische Branchenverbände.

Unter dem Motto „Textiltechnik als Schlüsseltechnologie der Zukunft“ informieren sich Maschinenproduzenten, Anwender, Textilfachleute und Forschende über neueste Entwicklungen in den Themenbereichen:

  • Ressourceneffiziente und nachhaltige Prozesse
  • Textiltechnologien für den Leichtbau
  • Digitalisierung in der textilen Produktion
  • Additive Fertigung mit Fasern und Textilien

Das Format bietet neben klassischen Vorträgen im Plenarteil und vier Themenkomplexen auch Pitches sowie studentische und wissenschaftliche Projektvorstellungen bzw. Exponate-Präsentationen.

Im Plenarteil der Veranstaltung werden der europäische GFK-Markt vorgestellt und die Bedeutung des Mittelstandes für die deutsche Volkswirtschaft näher beleuchtet.

Ausgewählte technologische Highlights der Fachvorträge in diesem Jahr sind neuartige Verfahren zum 3D-Druck, innovative Carbon-Textilien für die Betonarmierung sowie neue Digitalisierungsstrategien für den Maschinenbau und die Textilindustrie.

Kooperationspartner der diesjährigen Veranstaltung sind das tschechische Generalkonsulat und tschechische Branchenverbände.

Source:

Förderverein Cetex Chemnitzer Textilmaschinenentwicklung e.V.

IVL
03.08.2022

Winners of the RECO Sustainable Young Designer Competition

Indorama Ventures Public Company Limited (IVL) named the winners of ‘RECO Young Designer Competition’, Thailand's largest upcycling fashion design event, parading haute couture garments containing at least 60% recycled materials.

Eleven finalists showcased 33 handmade sustainable outfits at the 9th edition of the fashion show at IVL’s headquarters in Bangkok, using recycled PET and polyester items to craft creative fashions. Under the concept of ‘REVIVE: Start from the Street,’ RECO supports young Thai designers while raising awareness of recycling. The designs use a range of recycled materials including recycled PET yarns, discarded fabric from factories, and even repurposed safety belts.

Indorama Ventures Public Company Limited (IVL) named the winners of ‘RECO Young Designer Competition’, Thailand's largest upcycling fashion design event, parading haute couture garments containing at least 60% recycled materials.

Eleven finalists showcased 33 handmade sustainable outfits at the 9th edition of the fashion show at IVL’s headquarters in Bangkok, using recycled PET and polyester items to craft creative fashions. Under the concept of ‘REVIVE: Start from the Street,’ RECO supports young Thai designers while raising awareness of recycling. The designs use a range of recycled materials including recycled PET yarns, discarded fabric from factories, and even repurposed safety belts.

RECO awarded finalists and winners with 500,000 baht in prizes to support their careers. First prize of 125,000 baht was awarded to 23-year-old emerging furniture designer Prem Buachum for his ‘The Origin of Rebirth’ collection, using fabric recycled from post-consumer PET bottles. The first runner-up, Sathitkhun Boonmee, was awarded 75,000 baht for his ‘Remembering Your Favorite Teddy Bear’ collection, using old dolls made of polyester fibers. Second runners-up, Worameth Monthanom and Tanakorn Sritong, received 50,000 baht for their ‘Regeneration of Nature (into Spring)’ collection, using unused fabrics and discarded PET film. Napat Tansuwan, a finalist with his’ Don’t Judge’ collection, will go on to create designer merchandise for sponsor Buriram United Football Club using local weaving techniques from communities in Buriram province.

Mrs. Aradhana Lohia Sharma, Vice President at Indorama Ventures and RECO Young Designer Competition Chairperson, said, “Since 2011, RECO's ambition has been to uplift recycling and inspire people to realize the value of recyclable materials to produce great new products for daily life. We have witnessed many thoughtful initiatives on upcycling through the collections created by our talented young Thai designers. The designs this year showcase stunning wearability and innovation while using a large percentage of recycle materials. Public interest in recycling has been growing immensely, and we are grateful to strengthen the relationship with partners like Buriram United Football Club.”

“Indorama Ventures hopes this competition will be a driving force in nurturing sustainable fashion concepts and increasing the acceptance of recycled materials, especially post-consumer PET. We are proud to be a stepping-stone for our youth's design journey and our community’s sustainable future.”

Source:

IVL

Foto: INNATEX – Internationale Fachmesse für nachhaltige Textilien
02.08.2022

50. INNATEX: Internationale Fachmesse für Green Fashion sieht erste Erholungszeichen

Die 50. INNATEX schloss am 31. Juli mit einem besseren Ergebnis, als viele Beteiligte erwartet hatten. Die Order und Publikumszahlen lagen zwar noch unter den Werten, die vor Corona als Standard galten, aber die Kurven steigen wieder und die Atmosphäre war so ausgelassen, wie man es bis 2019 von der internationalen Fachmesse für Naturtextilien kannte. Ein großer Teil der Labels und Institutionen berichtet von steigenden Reichweiten. All das unterstreicht die steigende Relevanz von Nachhaltigkeit in der Mode.

Rückkehr zur Naturfaser – am besten biozertifiziert
Zu den Trendthemen der Green-Fashion-Branche auf der INNATEX zählten Kreislaufwirtschaft, Naturfasern wie Leinen und Hanf, Pastellfarben und Transparenz entlang der Lieferketten. Die vom Deutschen Nachhaltigkeitspreis ausgezeichnete Online-Plattform Retraced bietet blockchain-basierte Lösungen für die Nachvollziehung bis zur Ressource. Axel Kolonko repräsentierte das Startup als einer von sieben Expert:innen in der erstmaligen Community Area und berichtete von hohem Interesse.

Die 50. INNATEX schloss am 31. Juli mit einem besseren Ergebnis, als viele Beteiligte erwartet hatten. Die Order und Publikumszahlen lagen zwar noch unter den Werten, die vor Corona als Standard galten, aber die Kurven steigen wieder und die Atmosphäre war so ausgelassen, wie man es bis 2019 von der internationalen Fachmesse für Naturtextilien kannte. Ein großer Teil der Labels und Institutionen berichtet von steigenden Reichweiten. All das unterstreicht die steigende Relevanz von Nachhaltigkeit in der Mode.

Rückkehr zur Naturfaser – am besten biozertifiziert
Zu den Trendthemen der Green-Fashion-Branche auf der INNATEX zählten Kreislaufwirtschaft, Naturfasern wie Leinen und Hanf, Pastellfarben und Transparenz entlang der Lieferketten. Die vom Deutschen Nachhaltigkeitspreis ausgezeichnete Online-Plattform Retraced bietet blockchain-basierte Lösungen für die Nachvollziehung bis zur Ressource. Axel Kolonko repräsentierte das Startup als einer von sieben Expert:innen in der erstmaligen Community Area und berichtete von hohem Interesse.

Die Pandemie und andere Problematiken sorgen für Planungsunsicherheiten
Aktuelle Themen und Herausforderungen, die bei den Lounge Talks in der Community Area und in der Messehalle besprochen wurden, gab es viele. Dazu zählen bevorstehende EU-Maßnahmen wie der Product Environmental Footprint, so Heike Hess vom Internationalen Verband der Naturtextilwirtschaft (IVN) und Schirmherr der INNATEX.

„Ein weiterer Aspekt ist die Engpass-Situation bei der Beschaffung,“ sagt Hess. „Das liegt an gestörten Lieferketten unter anderem durch Corona, Klimawandel und der internationalen politischen Krise, die der Krieg hervorruft. Die Knappheit für kleinere, konsequente Naturtextiler verschärft sich noch, weil große Konzerne auf den Nachhaltigkeitszug aufspringen und mit ihren Bestellmengen Vorrang haben. Für die daraus resultierende Planungsunsicherheit diskutieren wir derzeit Lösungen, darunter die strategische Netzwerkbildung, die Sicherung von Biofasern und Erschließung neuer Märkte durch globale Anbauprojekte.“

Alexander Hitzel, Projektleiter der INNATEX, resümiert: „Pandemie, Beschaffung, Inflation, steigende Energiepreise – es lässt sich einfach nicht voraussagen, was die nachhaltige Modeindustrie und andere Branchen in den nächsten Monaten erwartet, da muss man ehrlich sein. Aber diese 50. INNATEX gibt uns Zuversicht, dass Green Fashion wieder auf der Erfolgskurve ist.“

Die nächste INNATEX findet vom 21. bis 23. Januar 2023 statt.

02.08.2022

DNFI Award 2022 open for applications – Deadline 9 Sept

Natural fibres offer mechanical strength, low weight, and resilience, as well as renewability and biodegradability, making them ideal partners to high-tech, modern, and sustainable textile applications. The DNFI Innovation in Natural Fibres Award offers recognition for outstanding design and innovation in this important textile sector.

The DNFI award has proven to be successful in raising awareness of the outstanding work being done by specialists in this field and previous winners speak of their appreciation for the subsequent media coverage and interest in their work.

  • Applicants are invited to submit their proposals by email to: Secretariat@dnfi.org.
  • Application templates are available on the DNFI web site: https://www.dnfi.org/dnfi-award
  • Closing Date for award applications is 9. September 2022.
  • A maximum of two extra pages (for a total of three pages) of information and three photographs/graphs/tables may be included with this submission.

Natural fibres offer mechanical strength, low weight, and resilience, as well as renewability and biodegradability, making them ideal partners to high-tech, modern, and sustainable textile applications. The DNFI Innovation in Natural Fibres Award offers recognition for outstanding design and innovation in this important textile sector.

The DNFI award has proven to be successful in raising awareness of the outstanding work being done by specialists in this field and previous winners speak of their appreciation for the subsequent media coverage and interest in their work.

  • Applicants are invited to submit their proposals by email to: Secretariat@dnfi.org.
  • Application templates are available on the DNFI web site: https://www.dnfi.org/dnfi-award
  • Closing Date for award applications is 9. September 2022.
  • A maximum of two extra pages (for a total of three pages) of information and three photographs/graphs/tables may be included with this submission.
More information:
DNFI DNFI award
Source:

DNFI

Photo: FET
02.08.2022

FET at Techtextil 2022: Principle theme was Sustainability

The company’s principle theme at Techtextil was Sustainability, since FET extrusion systems are ideally suited for both process and end-product development of sustainable materials. These systems are designed to be material efficient, can be bespoke designed and offer both flexibility and a high level of processing capability. They are supplied as self-contained units for ease of installation in a laboratory or small scale process evaluation environment.

FET’s enhanced Fibre Development Centre enables clients to develop and trial their own sustainable fibres and FET has now successfully processed almost 30 different polymer types in multifilament, monofilament and nonwoven formats

The innovative stand at Techtextil was specifically designed to highlight FET’s total commitment to all aspects of sustainability. It utilised as many sustainable components as possible and met with much comment and approval from visitors.

The company’s principle theme at Techtextil was Sustainability, since FET extrusion systems are ideally suited for both process and end-product development of sustainable materials. These systems are designed to be material efficient, can be bespoke designed and offer both flexibility and a high level of processing capability. They are supplied as self-contained units for ease of installation in a laboratory or small scale process evaluation environment.

FET’s enhanced Fibre Development Centre enables clients to develop and trial their own sustainable fibres and FET has now successfully processed almost 30 different polymer types in multifilament, monofilament and nonwoven formats

The innovative stand at Techtextil was specifically designed to highlight FET’s total commitment to all aspects of sustainability. It utilised as many sustainable components as possible and met with much comment and approval from visitors.

Fibre Extrusion Technology Limited (FET) of Leeds, England enjoyed another successful Techtextil in Frankfurt, with high quality enquiries from technical companies and organisations worldwide, but in particular from customers based in Europe.

Source:

DAVID STEAD PROJECT MARKETING LTD for FET

01.08.2022

Stahl joins CLIB biotechnology network

Stahl, an active proponent of responsible chemistry, has joined CLIB, an international open innovation cluster of stakeholders in the biotechnology space. CLIB is committed to providing networking opportunities for its members across different industries and sectors with a view to using biotechnology to foster sustainability. Stahl’s membership of the network underlines the company’s commitment to open innovation and to working with partners across value chains to reduce its Scope 3 emissions.

Stahl, an active proponent of responsible chemistry, has joined CLIB, an international open innovation cluster of stakeholders in the biotechnology space. CLIB is committed to providing networking opportunities for its members across different industries and sectors with a view to using biotechnology to foster sustainability. Stahl’s membership of the network underlines the company’s commitment to open innovation and to working with partners across value chains to reduce its Scope 3 emissions.

CLIB members include large companies, SMEs, start-ups, academic institutes, universities, and other stakeholders engaged in biotechnology and the circular- and bioeconomy as a whole. As part of this cluster, Stahl seeks to connect with likeminded contacts and partners to explore opportunities for increasing the use of bio-based and bio-derived solutions in its chemistries, products, and applications. In turn, Stahl hopes to add value to other members of the network by providing a route to market for biotechnology solutions through the company’s extensive range of industrial products and applications.
 
Stahl’s first face-to-face interaction with its fellow CLIB members will take place at the CLIB Networking Day in October 2022.

More information:
Stahl CLIB biotechnology
Source:

Stahl Holdings B.V.

Foto unsplash.com
27.07.2022

McKinsey Studie: Aus 20% des Textilabfalls könnte neue Kleidung werden

  • Weniger als 1% Textilmüll wird derzeit zu neuer Kleidung recycelt
  • 7,5 Millionen Tonnen Textilmüll fallen jährlich in Europa an
  • Nur 30-35% des Textilmülls werden getrennt gesammelt
  • Kreislaufwirtschaft für Textilien könnte 2030 15.000 neue Jobs in Europa schaffen und 6-8 Milliarden Euro Marktgröße erreichen
  • 6-7 Milliarden Euro an Anstoß-Investitionen bis 2030 nötig

Mehr als 15 Kilogramm Textilmüll produziert jeder Mensch in Europa im Durchschnitt pro Jahr, 2030 könnten es bereits über 20 Kilogramm pro Kopf sein. Der größte Anteil (85%) des Abfalls wird durch die privaten Haushalte verursacht: aus ihrer Kleidung und Heimtextilien. Weniger als 1% dieses Mülls wird derzeit in der EU-27 und der Schweiz zu neuen Textilprodukten recycelt. Mehr als 65% landen ohne Umwege direkt in der Müllverbrennung oder auf der Mülldeponie.

  • Weniger als 1% Textilmüll wird derzeit zu neuer Kleidung recycelt
  • 7,5 Millionen Tonnen Textilmüll fallen jährlich in Europa an
  • Nur 30-35% des Textilmülls werden getrennt gesammelt
  • Kreislaufwirtschaft für Textilien könnte 2030 15.000 neue Jobs in Europa schaffen und 6-8 Milliarden Euro Marktgröße erreichen
  • 6-7 Milliarden Euro an Anstoß-Investitionen bis 2030 nötig

Mehr als 15 Kilogramm Textilmüll produziert jeder Mensch in Europa im Durchschnitt pro Jahr, 2030 könnten es bereits über 20 Kilogramm pro Kopf sein. Der größte Anteil (85%) des Abfalls wird durch die privaten Haushalte verursacht: aus ihrer Kleidung und Heimtextilien. Weniger als 1% dieses Mülls wird derzeit in der EU-27 und der Schweiz zu neuen Textilprodukten recycelt. Mehr als 65% landen ohne Umwege direkt in der Müllverbrennung oder auf der Mülldeponie.

„Dabei könnten, wenn das volle technische Recyclingpotenzial genutzt und mehr Textilien gesammelt würden, bereits im Jahr 2030 zwischen 18 und 26 Prozent des Textilmülls für die Herstellung von neuen Kleidungsstücken wiederverwertet werden“, sagt Karl-Hendrik Magnus, Senior Partner und Leiter der Modeindustrieberatung bei McKinsey in Deutschland. „Ein skaliertes Textilrecycling würde nicht nur vier Millionen Tonnen CO2 einsparen, sondern auch einen profitablen Wirtschaftszweig mit 15.000 Jobs in Europa schaffen.“ Das sind Ergebnisse der Studie „Scaling textile recycling in Europe – turning waste into value“ von McKinsey & Company, für die Szenarien berechnet wurden, wie sich das Textilmüllvolumen sowie Sammel- und Recyclingraten bis 2030 entwickeln können.

Höhere Sammelrate von Kleidung entscheidend für mehr Recycling
Derzeit wird etwa ein Drittel der benutzten Kleidung gesammelt und wiederverwendet: entweder als Second-Hand-Mode, als grob recyceltes Textilprodukt wie Lappen und weniger als 1% als recycelte Textilfasern für neue Mode. Diese Sammelrate könnte bis 2030 auf 50-80% gesteigert werden. Entsprechend könnte auch die Kreislaufwirtschaft, die aus Textilabfall neue Fasern für Mode produziert, auf 18-26% skaliert werden. Heute ist es weniger als 1%. „Dieses so genannte Fiber-to-fiber-Recycling, bei dem aus Textilfasern neue Fasern für Mode hergestellt werden, stellt die nachhaltigste Möglichkeit dar, um aus Müll etwas Neues mit Wert zu generieren“, erklärt Jonatan Janmark, Co-Autor der Studie und Partner im Stockholmer Büro von McKinsey. Gleichzeitig bietet diese Kreislaufwirtschaft enormes finanzielles Potenzial mit sechs bis acht Milliarden Euro Umsatz als Marktgröße und möglichen jährlichen Renditen von 20-25% für die Recyclingindustrie.

Möglich wird diese Entwicklung hin zur Kreislaufwirtschaft durch neue Technologien, wie mechanisches Recycling von Baumwolle, das bereits recht etabliert ist, die innovative Verarbeitung zu Viskosefasern sowie chemisches Recycling für die Wiederverwertung von Polyester, was aktuell im Teststadium ist. Allerdings steht das Sammeln und die Aufbereitung der Altbekleidung und -textilien durch fragmentierte, kleinteilige Strukturen und noch meist manuelle Arbeitsvorgänge immer noch vor großen Herausforderungen.  Kleidungsabfälle müssen nach Qualitätskriterien sortiert, Knöpfe und Reißverschlüsse entfernt und Faserzusammensetzungen eindeutig identifiziert werden. Viele Produkte aus Mischfasern stellen noch ein ungelöstes Problem für Fiber-to-fiber-Recycling dar.

Investitionen für Skalierung nötig
Um das volle Potenzial des Textilrecyclings nutzen zu können, werden insgesamt etwa 6-7 Milliarden Euro an Investitionen bis 2030 benötigt, die in der gesamten Wertschöpfungskette wie beim Sammeln, Sortieren und dem Aufbau von Recyclingfabriken gebraucht werden. „Die Investition ins Fiber-to-fiber-Recycling lohnt sich nicht nur aus Nachhaltigkeitsgründen. Es können beim Recycling neue Rohmaterialien entstehen, die mehr Modeproduktion in Europa ermöglichen würden. Dadurch könnte diese Recyclingindustrie sogar noch mehr Wert generieren“, sagt Jonatan Janmark.

More information:
Textilabfällen McKinsey Studie
Source:

McKinsey

Grafik: Dibella GmbH
27.07.2022

Dibella setzt auf Solarenergie

  • Unternehmenseigene Solaranlage hat inzwischen 100.000 KWh Strom erzeugt

Dibella ist in einer sonnigen Region ansässig. Dort wird im Jahresdurchschnitt eine Sonnenscheindauer von ungefähr vier Stunden pro Tag gemeldet. Diese Energiequelle macht sich das Unternehmen zunutze: Auf der gesamten Dachfläche des im Jahr 2007 errichteten und im Jahr 2013 erweiterten Firmengebäudes wurde eine Solaranlage mit einer Nennleistung von ca. 13 Kilowatt-Peak (kWp) 2 installiert. Sie erzeugt den Strom für die Beheizung des gesamten Bauwerks. Seit ihrer Inbetriebnahme haben die 53 polykristallinen Solarmodule jährlich eine Energiemenge von etwa 11 MWh geliefert, in Jahren mit besonders guten Sommern sogar 13 MWh. Im Jahr 2020 gab es einen Ausreißer aufgrund eines Software-Defekts, so fehlte die Energie-Erzeugermenge von rund einem Dreivierteljahr.

  • Unternehmenseigene Solaranlage hat inzwischen 100.000 KWh Strom erzeugt

Dibella ist in einer sonnigen Region ansässig. Dort wird im Jahresdurchschnitt eine Sonnenscheindauer von ungefähr vier Stunden pro Tag gemeldet. Diese Energiequelle macht sich das Unternehmen zunutze: Auf der gesamten Dachfläche des im Jahr 2007 errichteten und im Jahr 2013 erweiterten Firmengebäudes wurde eine Solaranlage mit einer Nennleistung von ca. 13 Kilowatt-Peak (kWp) 2 installiert. Sie erzeugt den Strom für die Beheizung des gesamten Bauwerks. Seit ihrer Inbetriebnahme haben die 53 polykristallinen Solarmodule jährlich eine Energiemenge von etwa 11 MWh geliefert, in Jahren mit besonders guten Sommern sogar 13 MWh. Im Jahr 2020 gab es einen Ausreißer aufgrund eines Software-Defekts, so fehlte die Energie-Erzeugermenge von rund einem Dreivierteljahr.

Weitsichtig geplant
„Bei der Planung unseres Neubaus haben wir uns bewusst für die Nutzbarmachung von erneuerbaren Energien entschieden, da dies unserer Nachhaltigkeitsphilosophie entspricht. Die Solaranlage produziert einen umweltfreundlichen, kostengünstigen Strom“, berichtet Ralf Hellmann, Geschäftsführer von Dibella. „Gerade in den vergangenen Monaten hat sich gezeigt, wie richtig der damalige Entschluss für eine umweltfreundliche Wärmeerzeugung war: Wir sind von fossilen Brennstoffen und deren unberechenbaren Preisen und Verfügbarkeiten unabhängig. Die Investition in eine teurere, aber nachhaltige Technologie hat sich damit (wieder einmal) ausgezahlt.“

More information:
Dibella Solarenergie
Source:

Dibella GmbH

Lavendelpflanzen kurz vor der Blüte auf dem Versuchsfeld bei Hülben. Foto: Carolin Weiler
26.07.2022

Lavendelanbau auf der Schwäbischen Alb: Ätherisches Öl aus Blüten und Textilien von Pflanzenresten

In der Provence stehen Lavendelfelder in voller Blüte. Diese Farbenpracht kann bald auch in Baden-Württemberg zu sehen sein. In einem gemeinsamen Forschungsprojekt prüfen die Deutschen Institute für Textil- und Faserforschung Denkendorf (DITF), die Universität Hohenheim und die Firma naturamus geeignete Lavendelsorten und entwickeln energieeffiziente Methoden, daraus ätherisches Öl herzustellen. Auch für die Verwertung der großen Mengen an Reststoffen, die bei der Produktion anfallen, gibt es Ideen: Die DITF erforschen, wie daraus Fasern für klassische Textilien und Faserverbundwerkstoffe hergestellt werden können.

Bei Firma naturamus am Fuße der der Schwäbischen Alb besteht eine hohe Nachfrage an hochwertigen ätherischen Ölen für Arzneimittel und Naturkosmetik. Viel spricht dafür, Lavendel vor Ort anzubauen. Die ökologische Bewirtschaftung der Lavendelfelder würde dazu beitragen, den Anteil an ökologischem Landbau im Land zu erhöhen und Transportkosten einzusparen.

In der Provence stehen Lavendelfelder in voller Blüte. Diese Farbenpracht kann bald auch in Baden-Württemberg zu sehen sein. In einem gemeinsamen Forschungsprojekt prüfen die Deutschen Institute für Textil- und Faserforschung Denkendorf (DITF), die Universität Hohenheim und die Firma naturamus geeignete Lavendelsorten und entwickeln energieeffiziente Methoden, daraus ätherisches Öl herzustellen. Auch für die Verwertung der großen Mengen an Reststoffen, die bei der Produktion anfallen, gibt es Ideen: Die DITF erforschen, wie daraus Fasern für klassische Textilien und Faserverbundwerkstoffe hergestellt werden können.

Bei Firma naturamus am Fuße der der Schwäbischen Alb besteht eine hohe Nachfrage an hochwertigen ätherischen Ölen für Arzneimittel und Naturkosmetik. Viel spricht dafür, Lavendel vor Ort anzubauen. Die ökologische Bewirtschaftung der Lavendelfelder würde dazu beitragen, den Anteil an ökologischem Landbau im Land zu erhöhen und Transportkosten einzusparen.

Der Anbau von Lavendel auf der Alb bedeutet Neuland. Die Universität Hohenheim testet deswegen an vier Standorten fünf verschiedene Sorten, zum Beispiel auf dem Sonnenhof bei Bad Boll. Ende des Jahres werden die ersten Ergebnisse erwartet.

Bei der Gewinnung der ätherischen Öle fällt eine große Menge an Reststoffen an, die bisher noch nicht verwertet wird. Aus dem Lavendelstängel können Fasern für Textilien gewonnen werden. An den DITF laufen bereits Entwicklungen und Analysen mit diesem nachwachsenden Rohstoff. Um Lavendel-Destillationsreste zu verwerten, müssen die pflanzlichen Stängel mit ihren Faserbündeln aufgeschlossen, das heißt, in ihre Bestandteile zerlegt werden. Innerhalb eines Faserbündels sind die verholzten (lignifizierten) Einzelfasern fest durch pflanzlichen Zucker, dem Pektin, verbunden. Diese Verbindung soll beispielsweise mit Bakterien oder mit Enzymen aufgelöst werden.

DITF-Wissenschaftler Jamal Sarsour untersucht verschiedene Vorbereitungstechniken und Methoden, um aus dem Material Lang- und Kurzfasern herzustellen. „Wir sind gespannt, wie hoch die Ausbeute an Fasern sein wird und welche Eigenschaften diese Fasern haben“. Projektleiter Thomas Stegmaier ergänzt: „Die Länge, die Feinheit als auch die Festigkeit der Faserbündel entscheiden über die Verwendungsmöglichkeiten. Feine Fasern sind für Bekleidung geeignet, gröbere Faserbündel für technische Anwendungen“.

Die Chancen auf dem Markt sind gut. Regionale Wertschöpfung und ökologisch und fair erzeugte Textilien sind im Trend. Dabei geht es nicht in erster Linie um Bekleidung, sondern um technische Textilien. Die für den Leichtbau so wichtigen Faserbundwerkstoffe können auch mit nachwachsenden Naturfasern hergestellt werden, wie zum Beispiel bereits mit Hanf oder Flachs. Selbst aus Hopfen-Gärresten wurde an den DITF bereits Faserverbundmaterial hergestellt. Fasern aus den Reststoffen von Lavendel könnten ein weiterer natürlicher Baustein für Hightech-Anwendungen sein.

More information:
Lavendel DITF
Source:

Deutsche Institute für Textil- und Faserforschung Denkendorf

25.07.2022

Carbios: Strengthening its leadership in the biorecycling of plastics and textiles

  • Exceptional achievement of research work on the use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for understanding PET depolymerization enzymes

Carbios (Euronext Growth Paris: ALCRB), a pioneer in the development of enzymatic solutions dedicated to the end-of-life of plastic and textile polymers, announces the publication of an article entitled “An NMR look at an engineered PET depolymerase” in the scientific journal Biophysical Journal.

The article describes the use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to study the thermal stability of PET depolymerization enzymes and the mechanism of adsorption of the enzyme on the polymer. This innovative approach, which required months of development, is a world first and opens up new ways of improving these enzymes. This publication confirms Carbios' international lead in the development of the most efficient enzymes for the depolymerization and recycling of plastics.

  • Exceptional achievement of research work on the use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for understanding PET depolymerization enzymes

Carbios (Euronext Growth Paris: ALCRB), a pioneer in the development of enzymatic solutions dedicated to the end-of-life of plastic and textile polymers, announces the publication of an article entitled “An NMR look at an engineered PET depolymerase” in the scientific journal Biophysical Journal.

The article describes the use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to study the thermal stability of PET depolymerization enzymes and the mechanism of adsorption of the enzyme on the polymer. This innovative approach, which required months of development, is a world first and opens up new ways of improving these enzymes. This publication confirms Carbios' international lead in the development of the most efficient enzymes for the depolymerization and recycling of plastics.

Prof. Alain Marty, Chief Scientific Officer of Carbios and co-author of the article, explains: “ Nearly 25 researchers are currently working on our unique enzymatic technology. It is based on academic collaborations with the world's leading experts in their fields..”

Dr. Guy Lippens, CNRS Research Director and co-author of the artcle, adds: “Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is an extraordinary biophysical technique for visualizing an enzyme directly in solution. Our study is the first to use NMR as a complementary technique to crystallography and molecular modeling to observe a PETase. This gives new perspectives to better understand the functioning of these enzymes and it makes it possible to imagine new ways of improving these enzymes. ”

More information:
Carbios de-polymerization
Source:

Carbios

3 D Muster im Textil (Design und Foto: Gesa Balbig)
21.07.2022

„Design Goals“ in Augsburg – Alumni setzen Zeichen für nachhaltige Textilien

Noch bis zum 14. September 2022 zeigt das Staatliche Textil- und Industriemuseum Augsburg (tim) die Sonderausstellung „Design Goals“ zu nachhaltigen Textilien. Die Exponate stammen von Designerinnen, die am Fachbereich Textil- und Bekleidungstechnik an der Hochschule Niederrhein ihre Master-Ausbildung absolvierten und nun im Rahmen eines Europäischen Mentoring-Programms zusammen mit Professorin Dr. Marina-Elena Wachs ausstellen.

Zu sehen sind Modeentwürfe und andere Designobjekte aus Airbag-Stoffen, aus Textil-Ausschussware, aus Flusen, aus Herbstlaub, Papiergarnen und vieles mehr. Vor dem Hintergrund endlicher Ressourcen liegt der Fokus der zukunftsweisenden Arbeiten auf einem nachhaltigen Umgang mit dem Material Textil.

Die Ausstellung thematisiert den kreativen Prozess hinter vielversprechenden Innovationen im Mode-, Textil-, Interior- und Automotive Design und in der Architektur. Die Ausstellung gibt Einblicke in analoge und digitale Prozesse heutigen Gestaltens in einer nachhaltigen Welt von morgen.

Noch bis zum 14. September 2022 zeigt das Staatliche Textil- und Industriemuseum Augsburg (tim) die Sonderausstellung „Design Goals“ zu nachhaltigen Textilien. Die Exponate stammen von Designerinnen, die am Fachbereich Textil- und Bekleidungstechnik an der Hochschule Niederrhein ihre Master-Ausbildung absolvierten und nun im Rahmen eines Europäischen Mentoring-Programms zusammen mit Professorin Dr. Marina-Elena Wachs ausstellen.

Zu sehen sind Modeentwürfe und andere Designobjekte aus Airbag-Stoffen, aus Textil-Ausschussware, aus Flusen, aus Herbstlaub, Papiergarnen und vieles mehr. Vor dem Hintergrund endlicher Ressourcen liegt der Fokus der zukunftsweisenden Arbeiten auf einem nachhaltigen Umgang mit dem Material Textil.

Die Ausstellung thematisiert den kreativen Prozess hinter vielversprechenden Innovationen im Mode-, Textil-, Interior- und Automotive Design und in der Architektur. Die Ausstellung gibt Einblicke in analoge und digitale Prozesse heutigen Gestaltens in einer nachhaltigen Welt von morgen.

Der Titel „Design Goals“ bezieht sich auf die Ziele für nachhaltige Entwicklung (Sustainable Development Goals SDGs) der Vereinten Nationen. Die Ausstellung zeigt Design-Lösungen und Strategien in Form von Produkten, Materialien und Konzepten für die Zukunft: Kreative und textiltechnische Lösungen aus bisher ungenutzten Ressourcen.