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(c) nova-Institut GmbH
25.02.2022

Winner of the Cellulose Fibre Innovation of the Year

The annual highlight of the industry is the International Conference on Cellulose Fibres in Cologne, where the latest innovations were showcased: new cellulose fibre technologies for various feedstocks and a wide range of hygiene and textile products as well as alternatives to plastics and carbon fibre for lightweight constructions.

This year, for the first time, there were 230 participants from 27 countries. About 60 were able to attend on site – with strict Corona safety measures – while the others were able to attend online and participate in questions and discussions.

The conference gave deep insights into the promising future of cellulose fibres, which fit perfectly into the current trends of circular economy, recycling and sustainable carbon cycles.

The annual highlight of the industry is the International Conference on Cellulose Fibres in Cologne, where the latest innovations were showcased: new cellulose fibre technologies for various feedstocks and a wide range of hygiene and textile products as well as alternatives to plastics and carbon fibre for lightweight constructions.

This year, for the first time, there were 230 participants from 27 countries. About 60 were able to attend on site – with strict Corona safety measures – while the others were able to attend online and participate in questions and discussions.

The conference gave deep insights into the promising future of cellulose fibres, which fit perfectly into the current trends of circular economy, recycling and sustainable carbon cycles.

An important focus at the conference was alternative sources of cellulose. The increasing demand for cellulose fibres cannot be met in the long run with wood and used textiles alone. At the conference, a variety of agricultural by-products and biogenic waste were presented in presentations and panel discussions, such as orange and banana peels, grain and hemp straw. Much of this is high-volume and has not been put to high-value use so far. Exciting opportunities for the future cellulose fibre industry.

Innovation Award
Live at the conference, host nova-Institute and award sponsor GIG Karasek GmbH granted the “Cellulose Fibre Innovation of the Year” award to one of six highly interesting products.

  • First Winner: Carbon Fibres from Wood – German Institutes of Textile and Fiber Research Denkendorf (Germany)
  • Second Winner: Fibers365, Truly Carbon-Negative Virgin Fibres from Straw - Fibers365 (Germany)
  • Third Winner: Sustainable Menstruation Panties: Application-driven Fibre Functionalisation – Kelheim Fibres (Germany)
(c) Textile Exchange
17.08.2021

Textile Exchange: Preferred Fiber and Materials Market Report 2021 released

  • Textile Exchange report shows growth of preferred fiber and materials market needs to be accelerated
  • With post-pandemic fiber production increasing, the transition to preferred fibers and materials must be a non-negotiable decision, notes Textile Exchange.

According to a new Textile Exchange report, the market share for preferred fiber and materials grew significantly in 2020. The Preferred Fiber and Materials Market Report 2021 outlines the market for plant fibers such as cotton, hemp, and linen; animal fibers and materials such as wool, mohair, cashmere, alpaca, down, silk, and leather; manmade cellulosics (MMCFs) such as viscose, lyocell, modal, acetate, and cupro; as well as synthetics such as polyester, polyamide, and more.

  • Textile Exchange report shows growth of preferred fiber and materials market needs to be accelerated
  • With post-pandemic fiber production increasing, the transition to preferred fibers and materials must be a non-negotiable decision, notes Textile Exchange.

According to a new Textile Exchange report, the market share for preferred fiber and materials grew significantly in 2020. The Preferred Fiber and Materials Market Report 2021 outlines the market for plant fibers such as cotton, hemp, and linen; animal fibers and materials such as wool, mohair, cashmere, alpaca, down, silk, and leather; manmade cellulosics (MMCFs) such as viscose, lyocell, modal, acetate, and cupro; as well as synthetics such as polyester, polyamide, and more.

The report is a unique annual publication about global fiber and materials production, availability, and trends, including those associated with improved social and environmental impacts, referred to as ”preferred.” The comprehensive report includes quantitative data, industry updates, trend analysis and inspiring insights into the work of leading companies and organizations as they create material change.

The results show that between 2019 and 2020 the market share of preferred cotton increased from 24 to 30 percent and recycled polyester from 13.7 to 14.7 percent. Preferred cashmere increased from 0.8 to 7 percent of all cashmere produced while Responsible Mohair Standard certified fiber expanded from 0 to 27 percent of all mohair produced worldwide in its first year of existence in 2020. The market share of FSC and/or PEFC certified MMCFs increased to approximately 55-60 percent. While the market share of recycled MMCFs is only 0.4 percent, it is expected to increase significantly in the following years.

Brands’ increased interest in the use of preferred fibers and materials was also demonstrated by 75 percent increase in the total number of facilities (to 30,000) around the world becoming certified to the organization’s portfolio of standards in 2020. However, the report also notes that despite the increase, preferred fibers only represent less than one-fifth of the global fiber market. Less than 0.5 percent of the global fiber market was from pre- and post-consumer recycled textiles.

Indeed, global fiber production has almost doubled in the last 20 years from 58 million tonnes in 2000 to 109 million tonnes in 2020. While it is not yet clear how the pandemic and other factors will impact future development, global fiber production is expected to increase by another 34 percent to 146 million tonnes in 2030 if the industry builds back business as usual. If this growth continues, it will be increasingly difficult for the industry to meet science-based targets for climate and nature.

Textile Exchange aims to be the driving force for urgent climate action, and its Climate+ strategy calling for the textile industry to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 45 percent by 2030 compared to a 2019 baseline in the pre-spinning phase of textile fiber and materials production, while also addressing other impact areas interconnected with climate such as water, biodiversity, and soil health.

Source:

Textile Exchange

11.05.2021

Devan launches bio-based softener and quick-dry finish

Devan Chemicals recently added two more products to its range of bio-based textile finishes. One being a softener, the other one a quick-dry finish. Both are derived from vegetable oils and are in line with the company’s latest innovations on bio-based chemistry.

Due to the Covid-pandemic, serving as an accelerator for a worldwide green economy, the textile industry is increasingly seeking more sustainable and products fit-for-circular programs. According to McKinsey & Company, the textile industry will experience innovation surrounding sustainably sourced raw materials and bio-based chemical additives to accommodate increasing consumer demand.

Devan Chemicals recently added two more products to its range of bio-based textile finishes. One being a softener, the other one a quick-dry finish. Both are derived from vegetable oils and are in line with the company’s latest innovations on bio-based chemistry.

Due to the Covid-pandemic, serving as an accelerator for a worldwide green economy, the textile industry is increasingly seeking more sustainable and products fit-for-circular programs. According to McKinsey & Company, the textile industry will experience innovation surrounding sustainably sourced raw materials and bio-based chemical additives to accommodate increasing consumer demand.

Devan launched its first bio-based technology in 2019 and is fully committed to making bio-based versions of their existing textile finishes. ‘We have put ourselves on a mission to be able to extend our Bio-Based range further”, says Sven Ghyselinck, CEO of Devan. “We wanted to make an even bigger impact on circularity than before, therefore we looked into what fabric producers use a lot: softeners and moisture management systems. Only by focusing more on the large volume products, can we support the industry to have a bigger impact on sustainability. After the growing success of our natural antimicrobial BI-OME NTL, we are proud to now introduce our new natural Passerelle line”.

Passerelle Soft NTL is a durable softness technology based on vegetable ingredients. The technology is wash durable and can be used with natural fibres like hemp, cotton, but is also fit for synthetic fibres like rPES, PA. The bio content of the technology is above 85% (ASTM D6866-20).

Passerelle Quick-Dry NTL is a moisture management technology also based on vegetable ingredients. This bio-based finish enables high wicking and evaporation capability which helps to evaporate water/sweat easier and faster. The technology is also > 60% (28 days) biodegradable according to OECD 301B.