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Photo: Alexander Donka
08.12.2022

Lenzing and Renewcell sign large-scale supply agreement

The Lenzing Group, a leading supplier of sustainably produced specialty fibers, and Renewcell, the Swedish textile-to-textile recycling pioneer, have signed a multi-year supply agreement to accelerate the transition of the textile industry from a linear to a circular business model. The agreement contains the sale of 80,000 to 100,000 tonnes of Renewcell’s 100 per cent recycled textile Circulose® dissolving pulp to Lenzing over a five-year period, for use in the production of cellulosic fibers for fashion and other textile applications.

“The textile industry must change. By signing the agreement with Swedish textile-to-textile recycling company Renewcell, Lenzing is able to further integrate recycling and accelerate the transition of the textile industry from linear to circular. As champions of sustainability, we know that moving towards a circular economy is vital to address the enormous textile waste challenges of the industry”, says Christian Skilich, Chief Pulp Officer of the Lenzing Group.

The Lenzing Group, a leading supplier of sustainably produced specialty fibers, and Renewcell, the Swedish textile-to-textile recycling pioneer, have signed a multi-year supply agreement to accelerate the transition of the textile industry from a linear to a circular business model. The agreement contains the sale of 80,000 to 100,000 tonnes of Renewcell’s 100 per cent recycled textile Circulose® dissolving pulp to Lenzing over a five-year period, for use in the production of cellulosic fibers for fashion and other textile applications.

“The textile industry must change. By signing the agreement with Swedish textile-to-textile recycling company Renewcell, Lenzing is able to further integrate recycling and accelerate the transition of the textile industry from linear to circular. As champions of sustainability, we know that moving towards a circular economy is vital to address the enormous textile waste challenges of the industry”, says Christian Skilich, Chief Pulp Officer of the Lenzing Group.

“Lenzing is a major player in our industry, with an inspiring track record of path-breaking technical excellence and sustainability leadership. Our new partnership fits perfectly into Renewcell’s strategy to accelerate the scale-up of circular materials by collaborating with fashion’s most important players. We are more than pleased to join forces with Lenzing with the shared goal of making fashion circular.” said Patrik Lundström, CEO of Renewcell, in a comment on the agreement.

Canopy, a not-for-profit environmental organization dedicated to protecting forests, species, and climate, welcomes the agreement between Lenzing and Renewcell.
“Accelerating the transition to low-impact, circular production is the challenge of the decade for the fashion industry. That is why this partnership between Renewcell and Lenzing is so refreshing – it will bring low-carbon Next Gen solutions to market at scale,” exclaimed Nicole Rycroft, Executive Director of Canopy. “With the climate and biodiversity clocks ticking, the race to circularity is one we need all companies to win.”
 
It is an essential part of Lenzing’s corporate strategy and ambitious sustainability targets to become a true champion of circularity and to offer TENCEL™ and LENZING™ ECOVERO™ branded specialty textile fibers with up to 50 percent post-consumer recycled content on a commercial scale by 2025. To reach this goal Lenzing partners with recycling pioneers like Renewcell.
Circulose® originates 100 per cent from textile waste, like old jeans and production scraps, and turns into dissolving pulp. It transforms textile waste and production scrap into new high-quality textile products.

Source:

Lenzing AG / Renewxell

15.11.2022

Renewcell and Eastman collaborate to develop textile-to-textile recycled yarns

The Swedish textile-to-textile recycling company Renewcell has signed a Letter of Intent with Eastman, a leading US cellulosic acetate fiber producer, for a collaboration to develop Naia™ Renew ES yarns sourced from Circulose®, Renewcell’s 100% recycled textile raw material. The agreement is Renewcell’s first with a US-based fiber producer and an important step in developing the first acetate-based applications to use Circulose® feedstock.

”Eastman considering Circulose® as a feedstock in the production of a premium yarn like Naia™ Renew reflects very well on the Renewcell team’s ability to work with partners to adjust and optimize our product for new fiber applications. This agreement signals an acceleration of our joint efforts to bring Naia™ Renew ES yarns derived from Circulose® to market. I look forward to working alongside Eastman in making fashion circular.” comments Patrik Lundström, CEO of Renewcell.

The Swedish textile-to-textile recycling company Renewcell has signed a Letter of Intent with Eastman, a leading US cellulosic acetate fiber producer, for a collaboration to develop Naia™ Renew ES yarns sourced from Circulose®, Renewcell’s 100% recycled textile raw material. The agreement is Renewcell’s first with a US-based fiber producer and an important step in developing the first acetate-based applications to use Circulose® feedstock.

”Eastman considering Circulose® as a feedstock in the production of a premium yarn like Naia™ Renew reflects very well on the Renewcell team’s ability to work with partners to adjust and optimize our product for new fiber applications. This agreement signals an acceleration of our joint efforts to bring Naia™ Renew ES yarns derived from Circulose® to market. I look forward to working alongside Eastman in making fashion circular.” comments Patrik Lundström, CEO of Renewcell.

Ruth Farell, GM of Eastman Textiles says: ”we are thrilled to collaborate with a pioneeer such as Renewcell to lower our reliance on virgin feedstocks, redefine the essence of textile waste and close the loop within the textiles industry. This collaboration is at the heart of our strategy to launch a portfolio of products with increased recycled content”

(c) Robin Inizan – Lucas Pavy Production
Tearing line by ANDRITZ in operation at the Renaissance Textile plant
11.11.2022

Renaissance Textile starts up the first textile recycling line by ANDRITZ in France

Renaissance Textile in Laval, France has successfully started up a complete textile recycling line, delivered, installed, and commissioned by ANDRITZ Laroche, part of the international technology group ANDRITZ.

The ANDRITZ textile recycling equipment enabled Renaissance Textile to become the first French recycling platform dedicated to industrial end-of-life textiles. The project aims to produce new fibers from the collected post-consumer apparel, which will be used to weave new recycled fabrics in the end.

The new 12,000 m² plant is equipped with a complete tearing line whose design is the result of close collaboration between R&D specialists from ANDRITZ Laroche and Renaissance Textile, as well as customized trials carried out jointly by the two parties at the ANDRITZ technical center in Cours, France.

Renaissance Textile in Laval, France has successfully started up a complete textile recycling line, delivered, installed, and commissioned by ANDRITZ Laroche, part of the international technology group ANDRITZ.

The ANDRITZ textile recycling equipment enabled Renaissance Textile to become the first French recycling platform dedicated to industrial end-of-life textiles. The project aims to produce new fibers from the collected post-consumer apparel, which will be used to weave new recycled fabrics in the end.

The new 12,000 m² plant is equipped with a complete tearing line whose design is the result of close collaboration between R&D specialists from ANDRITZ Laroche and Renaissance Textile, as well as customized trials carried out jointly by the two parties at the ANDRITZ technical center in Cours, France.

The new clothing produced based on this type of circular economy model thus reflects the social and sustainability commitments of Renaissance Textile in terms of decarbonizing the textile industry, the fight against global warming, autonomy in raw material sourcing, and promotion of local staffing, particularly for people who have been unemployed for a long time or are seeking to enter the labor market for the first time. By 2025, for example, Renaissance Textile plans to create no less than 110 direct jobs.

Texaid / Texcircle
26.10.2022

Swiss Textile Recycling Project TEXCIRLCE

After two years of joint collaboration and research the Swiss Textile Recycling Project “Texcircle” comes to an end. Partners and stakeholders have worked on the vision of a textile cluster where materials flow in circular loops. The goal of the project was to develop high-quality yarns and products incorporating such a large amount of recycled textiles as possible. In the end, several product prototypes from carpets, socks, and curtains to pullovers, padding and accessories have been developed with at least 50 % recycled fiber up to 80 % recycled fibers and yarns.

Europe has a waste problem of 7.5 million waste of which only 30-35 % is collected and less than 1 % of the textile and clothing worldwide is recycled into textiles and clothing again. It is as well found that around 80 % of the impact of a textile product lies in the design.

After two years of joint collaboration and research the Swiss Textile Recycling Project “Texcircle” comes to an end. Partners and stakeholders have worked on the vision of a textile cluster where materials flow in circular loops. The goal of the project was to develop high-quality yarns and products incorporating such a large amount of recycled textiles as possible. In the end, several product prototypes from carpets, socks, and curtains to pullovers, padding and accessories have been developed with at least 50 % recycled fiber up to 80 % recycled fibers and yarns.

Europe has a waste problem of 7.5 million waste of which only 30-35 % is collected and less than 1 % of the textile and clothing worldwide is recycled into textiles and clothing again. It is as well found that around 80 % of the impact of a textile product lies in the design.

Together with the design research expertise of the Lucerne University of Applied sciences and arts, the spinning expertise of Rieter and the sorting and collection expertise of Texaid, systems should be created where products of high quality can be produced of recycled fiber. On board were the expertise of further Cluster partners of Brands, Retailers, and the public sector to see how a joint Cluster and system coukld be established.

The Project Texcircle and cluster is led by the Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts – Art  & Design, and in collaboration with Coop, Rieter, Jacob Rohner AG, Ruckstuhl AG, TEXAID as well as workfashion.com ag. Furthermore, Bundesamt für Zivildienst ZIVI, NIKIN AG, and Tiger Liz Textiles are supporting the project. The project is funded by Innosuisse.

Furthermore, collaboration partners from all over Europe contributed to the project to enable these prototypes and systems.

Through joint developments from the design, the collecting, sorting trials, tearing, and spinning trials until the actual production trials and product testing. The partners were able to recycle 2.5 Tons of pre-and post-consumer textile waste into product prototypes with a promising commercial interest. From socks, west, and pullovers to non-woven felts and accessories to carpets and curtains. Through our 2 years of collaboration, the teamcame across several hurdles in the textile recycling value chain which could be tackled. This was a proof of concept that a circular system is possible and the industry now has to enable this at full scale.

Source:

Texaid / Texcircle

20.10.2022

Lenzing: Ambitions in textile recycling

  • Lenzing becomes partner company of CISUTAC
  • New project CISUTAC, co-funded by the EU, shall remove barriers to circularity in the textile industry
  • Lenzing will make a contribution in cellulose recycling

The Lenzing Group, a leading provider of specialty fibers for the textile and nonwoven industries, is reinforcing its commitment to circularity by becoming a partner in the CISUTAC (Circular and Sustainable Textile and Clothing) project that is co-funded by the EU. The new consortium was established to support the transition to a circular and sustainable textile sector and, as well as Lenzing, the 27 consortium members include the industry association Euratex, textile company Inditex, PVH, Decathlon and non-governmental organization Oxfam. For its part, Lenzing is focusing on the development of recycling processes for cellulose.
 
CISUTAC aims to remove current bottlenecks in order to enhance textile circularity in Europe. Its goal is to minimize the sector’s total environmental impact by developing sustainable, novel and inclusive large-scale European value chains.

 

  • Lenzing becomes partner company of CISUTAC
  • New project CISUTAC, co-funded by the EU, shall remove barriers to circularity in the textile industry
  • Lenzing will make a contribution in cellulose recycling

The Lenzing Group, a leading provider of specialty fibers for the textile and nonwoven industries, is reinforcing its commitment to circularity by becoming a partner in the CISUTAC (Circular and Sustainable Textile and Clothing) project that is co-funded by the EU. The new consortium was established to support the transition to a circular and sustainable textile sector and, as well as Lenzing, the 27 consortium members include the industry association Euratex, textile company Inditex, PVH, Decathlon and non-governmental organization Oxfam. For its part, Lenzing is focusing on the development of recycling processes for cellulose.
 
CISUTAC aims to remove current bottlenecks in order to enhance textile circularity in Europe. Its goal is to minimize the sector’s total environmental impact by developing sustainable, novel and inclusive large-scale European value chains.

 

29.09.2022

CISUTAC: New European innovation project on circular & sustainable textiles

Launched this September, the new Horizon Europe project CISUTAC will support the transition to a circular and sustainable textile sector. As part of a consortium of 27 partners working on the project, TEXAID will among others support the project with sorting, disassembly and repair trials.

The production and consumption of textile products continue to grow, together with their impact on the environment, due to a lack of reuse, repair and recycling of materials. Quality, durability, and recyclability are often not being set as priorities in the design and manufacturing of clothing (EU Strategy for Sustainable and Circular Textiles, March 2022).  

CISUTAC aims to remove current bottlenecks in order to increase textile circularity in Europe. The objective is to minimise the sector’s total environmental impact by developing sustainable, novel, and inclusive large-scale European value chains.  

Launched this September, the new Horizon Europe project CISUTAC will support the transition to a circular and sustainable textile sector. As part of a consortium of 27 partners working on the project, TEXAID will among others support the project with sorting, disassembly and repair trials.

The production and consumption of textile products continue to grow, together with their impact on the environment, due to a lack of reuse, repair and recycling of materials. Quality, durability, and recyclability are often not being set as priorities in the design and manufacturing of clothing (EU Strategy for Sustainable and Circular Textiles, March 2022).  

CISUTAC aims to remove current bottlenecks in order to increase textile circularity in Europe. The objective is to minimise the sector’s total environmental impact by developing sustainable, novel, and inclusive large-scale European value chains.  

The project will cover most parts of the textile sector by working on two material groups representing almost 90% of all textile fibre materials (polyester, and cotton/cellulosic fibres), and focusing on products from three sub-sectors experiencing varying circularity bottlenecks (fashion garments, sports and outdoor goods, and workwear).  

CISUTAC will follow a holistic approach covering the technical, sectoral and socio-economic aspects, and will perform three pilots to demonstrate the feasibility and value of:

  • Repair and disassembly
  • Sorting (for reuse and recycling)
  • Circular garments through fibre-to-fibre recycling and design for circularity

To realise these pilots, the consortium partners will:

  • Develop semi-automated workstations
  • Analyse the infrastructure and material flows
  • Digitally enhance sorting operations (for reuse and recycling)
  • Raise awareness among the consumers and the textile industry

As part of the CISUTAC consortium, TEXAID, will conduct different trials of sorting, repair, and disassembly, and be active in the LCA and Standardisation work packages.

Source:

TEXAID Textilverwertungs-AG

(c) Texaid
21.09.2022

TEXAID installs intelligent sorting stations from circular.fashion

Digital Product Passports can now be processed at TEXAID’s largest sorting facility, thanks to circular.fashion’s intelligent sorting stations, which use RFID and NFC technology to improve the quality and consistency of manual sorting.

Digital Product Passports (DPP) have been recognised by the EU as an enabler for circular fashion and textiles. Technology company circular.fashion has been a leader in this effort, releasing the circularity.ID in 2018 and developing Intelligent Sorting Stations to bring ID based sorting to the textile reuse and recycling industry.

ID based sorting optimises the manual sorting process for reuse and recycling by giving sorters data to make decisions more accurately and consistently. TEXAID has, by adopting this technology, increased Europe’s capacity to process DPPs.

Digital Product Passports can now be processed at TEXAID’s largest sorting facility, thanks to circular.fashion’s intelligent sorting stations, which use RFID and NFC technology to improve the quality and consistency of manual sorting.

Digital Product Passports (DPP) have been recognised by the EU as an enabler for circular fashion and textiles. Technology company circular.fashion has been a leader in this effort, releasing the circularity.ID in 2018 and developing Intelligent Sorting Stations to bring ID based sorting to the textile reuse and recycling industry.

ID based sorting optimises the manual sorting process for reuse and recycling by giving sorters data to make decisions more accurately and consistently. TEXAID has, by adopting this technology, increased Europe’s capacity to process DPPs.

The installation and testing of TEXAID’s new Intelligent Sorting Stations was completed successfully shortly before the holiday period. Initial test results indicate that ID based sorting can make sorting decisions more reliable and more consistent. The team also sees a potential for ID based sorting to reduce training costs for new employees and maximise the value of their sorting decisions. This advancement was made through the CIRTEX project, funded through the KMU Innovativ funding programme from the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research.

The Intelligent Sorting Stations at TEXAID are now operational, and brands and retailers have the ability to adopt the circularity.ID as a Digital Product Passport and have textile products returned to TEXAID for ID based sorting.

02.09.2022

RGE: Closed-loop urban-fit textile-to-textile recycling solutions in Singapore

  • Aims to tackle the immense textile waste generated in urban environments, on the back of import bans of waste materials
  • Addresses the shortcomings of current textile recycling technologies, which are unsuitable for urban settings due to the use of heavy chemicals
  • Technologies developed by the newly-formed RGE-NTU Sustainable Textile Research Centre will be test-bedded in RGE’s pilot urban-fit textile recycling plant, projected for completion as early as 2024

Royal Golden Eagle (“RGE”), a global group of resource-based manufacturing companies, which includes a world-leading viscose fibre producers Sateri and Asia Pacific Rayon (APR), is developing urban-fit, closed-loop textile-to-textile recycling solutions, through the newly-formed RGE-NTU Sustainable Textile Research Centre (RGE-NTU SusTex). This is a five-year research collaboration between RGE and Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (“NTU”), to accelerate innovation in textile recycling that can be deployed in urban settings.

  • Aims to tackle the immense textile waste generated in urban environments, on the back of import bans of waste materials
  • Addresses the shortcomings of current textile recycling technologies, which are unsuitable for urban settings due to the use of heavy chemicals
  • Technologies developed by the newly-formed RGE-NTU Sustainable Textile Research Centre will be test-bedded in RGE’s pilot urban-fit textile recycling plant, projected for completion as early as 2024

Royal Golden Eagle (“RGE”), a global group of resource-based manufacturing companies, which includes a world-leading viscose fibre producers Sateri and Asia Pacific Rayon (APR), is developing urban-fit, closed-loop textile-to-textile recycling solutions, through the newly-formed RGE-NTU Sustainable Textile Research Centre (RGE-NTU SusTex). This is a five-year research collaboration between RGE and Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (“NTU”), to accelerate innovation in textile recycling that can be deployed in urban settings. The research centre will develop new technologies to recycle textile waste into fibre and create new, next-generation eco-friendly and sustainable textiles.

This move comes on the back of the tightening of waste import bans in countries such as China, India and Indonesia, which are among the world’s largest waste processors. The stricter import bans have left cities in need of viable local textile recycling solutions to tackle the immense textile waste generated.

RGE Executive Director, Mr Perry Lim, said, “Current textile recycling technologies, which rely primarily on a bleaching and separation process using heavy chemicals, cannot be implemented due to environmental laws. At the same time, there is an urgent need to keep textiles out of the brimming landfills.” He added, “As the world’s largest viscose producer, we aim to catalyse closed-loop, textile-to-textile recycling by developing optimal urban-fit solutions that can bring the world closer to a circular textile economy.”

Globally, an estimated 90 million tonnes of textile waste is generated and disposed of every year, with less than 1% being upcycled into new clothing or other textile materials. By 2030, the amount of global textile waste, which currently accounts for almost 10% of municipal solid waste, is expected to reach more than 134 million tonnes. The textile industry is also responsible for 10% of global greenhouse gas emissions – more than international flights and maritime shipping combined.

At present, most of the available textile recycling technologies are open-loop, where textile waste is typically downcycled to lower-quality products (insulating materials, cleaning cloths, etc.) or be used in waste-to-heat recycling.

“Closed-loop textile-to-textile recycling processes, particularly chemical recycling, are still under development. Scaling up the technologies to industrial scale remains a challenge. A key bottleneck is that refabricating textile waste into fibre needs purity standards for feedstock. However, most of the clothes that we wear are made of a mixture of different synthetic and natural fibres, which makes separating the complex blends of materials challenging for effective recycling.

“Our aim is to address this industry pain point by developing viable solutions that use less energy, fewer chemicals and produces harmless and less effluents, and then potentially scale up across our global operations,” Mr Lim said.

To tackle the key challenges in closed-loop textile recycling, RGE-NTU SusTex is looking into four key research areas, namely cleaner and more energy efficient methods of recycling into new raw materials, automated sorting of textile waste, eco-friendly dye removal, and development of a new class of sustainable textiles that is durable for wear and, at the same time, lends itself to easier recycling.

Technologies developed by RGE-NTU SusTex will be test bedded at RGE’s pilot urban-fit textile recycling plant in Singapore, which is projected for completion as early as 2024. If successful, RGE has plans to replicate the plant in other urban cities within its footprint.

 

Source:

Royal Golden Eagle

(C) INDA
17.08.2022

RISE® – Research, Innovation & Science for Engineered Fabrics Conference in September

  • Focus on Rethinking, Reusing and Recycling Nonwovens this September
  • Industry Experts Present Material Science Innovations & Sustainability

More than 20 industry experts will present their views on how material science innovations can create a more sustainable future for the nonwovens industry at the Research, Innovation & Science for Engineered Fabrics (RISE®) Conference, Sept. 27-28 in Raleigh, at North Carolina State University, co-organized by INDA and The Nonwovens Institute at North Carolina State University.

Starting with responsible sourcing of nonwoven inputs to developing realistic end-of-life options and circularity opportunities, RISE will focus on rethinking, reusing and recycling nonwovens and engineered materials at the Talley Student Union in Raleigh.    

Participants will learn what’s coming next with sessions on the following six themes: Towards a More Circular Industry; Advancement in Sustainable Inputs; Development in Natural Fibers; Sustainable Inputs: Fibers and Biofibers; Waste Not, Want Not, Sustainable Inputs from Waste Products; and Economic Insights and Market Intelligence.

  • Focus on Rethinking, Reusing and Recycling Nonwovens this September
  • Industry Experts Present Material Science Innovations & Sustainability

More than 20 industry experts will present their views on how material science innovations can create a more sustainable future for the nonwovens industry at the Research, Innovation & Science for Engineered Fabrics (RISE®) Conference, Sept. 27-28 in Raleigh, at North Carolina State University, co-organized by INDA and The Nonwovens Institute at North Carolina State University.

Starting with responsible sourcing of nonwoven inputs to developing realistic end-of-life options and circularity opportunities, RISE will focus on rethinking, reusing and recycling nonwovens and engineered materials at the Talley Student Union in Raleigh.    

Participants will learn what’s coming next with sessions on the following six themes: Towards a More Circular Industry; Advancement in Sustainable Inputs; Development in Natural Fibers; Sustainable Inputs: Fibers and Biofibers; Waste Not, Want Not, Sustainable Inputs from Waste Products; and Economic Insights and Market Intelligence.

The 12th edition of RISE® will bring together thought leaders in product development, materials science, and new technologies to connect and convene for the industry’s premier nonwovens science and technology conference.

Expert speakers will address the latest trends and innovations around circularity – an important component of sustainability strategies that aims to return a product into the supply chain, instead of the landfill, after users are done consuming it.

RISE® session highlights include:

  • The Global Plastic Crisis: Who Will Be the Winners/Losers in The Marketplace?
    Bryan Haynes, Ph.D., Senior Technical Director, Global Nonwovens, Kimberly-Clark Corporation
  • Sustainable Fibers – Developments and the Future
    Jason Locklin, Ph.D., Director, University of Georgia, New Materials Institute and David Grewell, Ph.D., Center Director, Center for Bioplastics and Biocomposites
  • Thinking Differently: In a Changing World What’s Next for NatureWorks and Polylactic Acid Polymers (PLA)
    Liz Johnson, Ph.D., Vice President of Technology, NatureWorks LLC
  • PLA and PLA Blends: Practical Aspects of Extrusion
    Behnam Pourdeyhimi, Ph.D., William A. Klopman Distinguished Professor and Executive Director, The Nonwovens Institute, North Carolina State University
  • Hemp is Strong – Are You?
    Olaf Isele, Strategic Product Development Director, Trace Femcare, Inc.
  • Exploring Natural Fibers in Nonwovens
    Paul Latten, Director of Research and Development & New Business, Southeast Nonwovens, Inc.
  • Potential Nonwoven Applications of Tree-Free Fibers Made from Microbial Cellulose –
    Heidi Beatty, Chief Executive Officer, Crown Abbey, LLC
  • Ultra Fine Fibers Made from Recycled Materials
    Takashi Owada, General Manager, Teijin Frontier (U.S.A.), Inc.

The event also will feature the presentation of the RISE® Innovation Award, a special opportunity to tour the Nonwovens Institute’s state-of-the-art facilities with advance registration required, and poster presentations by North Carolina State University graduate students.

Source:

INDA, Association of the Nonwoven Fabrics Industry

IVL
03.08.2022

Winners of the RECO Sustainable Young Designer Competition

Indorama Ventures Public Company Limited (IVL) named the winners of ‘RECO Young Designer Competition’, Thailand's largest upcycling fashion design event, parading haute couture garments containing at least 60% recycled materials.

Eleven finalists showcased 33 handmade sustainable outfits at the 9th edition of the fashion show at IVL’s headquarters in Bangkok, using recycled PET and polyester items to craft creative fashions. Under the concept of ‘REVIVE: Start from the Street,’ RECO supports young Thai designers while raising awareness of recycling. The designs use a range of recycled materials including recycled PET yarns, discarded fabric from factories, and even repurposed safety belts.

Indorama Ventures Public Company Limited (IVL) named the winners of ‘RECO Young Designer Competition’, Thailand's largest upcycling fashion design event, parading haute couture garments containing at least 60% recycled materials.

Eleven finalists showcased 33 handmade sustainable outfits at the 9th edition of the fashion show at IVL’s headquarters in Bangkok, using recycled PET and polyester items to craft creative fashions. Under the concept of ‘REVIVE: Start from the Street,’ RECO supports young Thai designers while raising awareness of recycling. The designs use a range of recycled materials including recycled PET yarns, discarded fabric from factories, and even repurposed safety belts.

RECO awarded finalists and winners with 500,000 baht in prizes to support their careers. First prize of 125,000 baht was awarded to 23-year-old emerging furniture designer Prem Buachum for his ‘The Origin of Rebirth’ collection, using fabric recycled from post-consumer PET bottles. The first runner-up, Sathitkhun Boonmee, was awarded 75,000 baht for his ‘Remembering Your Favorite Teddy Bear’ collection, using old dolls made of polyester fibers. Second runners-up, Worameth Monthanom and Tanakorn Sritong, received 50,000 baht for their ‘Regeneration of Nature (into Spring)’ collection, using unused fabrics and discarded PET film. Napat Tansuwan, a finalist with his’ Don’t Judge’ collection, will go on to create designer merchandise for sponsor Buriram United Football Club using local weaving techniques from communities in Buriram province.

Mrs. Aradhana Lohia Sharma, Vice President at Indorama Ventures and RECO Young Designer Competition Chairperson, said, “Since 2011, RECO's ambition has been to uplift recycling and inspire people to realize the value of recyclable materials to produce great new products for daily life. We have witnessed many thoughtful initiatives on upcycling through the collections created by our talented young Thai designers. The designs this year showcase stunning wearability and innovation while using a large percentage of recycle materials. Public interest in recycling has been growing immensely, and we are grateful to strengthen the relationship with partners like Buriram United Football Club.”

“Indorama Ventures hopes this competition will be a driving force in nurturing sustainable fashion concepts and increasing the acceptance of recycled materials, especially post-consumer PET. We are proud to be a stepping-stone for our youth's design journey and our community’s sustainable future.”

Source:

IVL

27.06.2022

Transforming textile waste into feedstock

Europe has a 7-7.5-million-ton waste problem, of which only 30-35% is collected today. The ReHubs initiative launched in 2020 has now completed a Techno Economic Master Study (TES) and it sheds light on key figures and options to collaborate to solve the European waste problem.

In two and a half year all EU member states are obliged to separately collect textile waste. Currently there are no large-scaled plans to use that waste.  The largest portion of the waste (around 85%) comes from households.

Europe has a 7-7.5-million-ton waste problem, of which only 30-35% is collected today. The ReHubs initiative launched in 2020 has now completed a Techno Economic Master Study (TES) and it sheds light on key figures and options to collaborate to solve the European waste problem.

In two and a half year all EU member states are obliged to separately collect textile waste. Currently there are no large-scaled plans to use that waste.  The largest portion of the waste (around 85%) comes from households.

The ReHubs initiative brings together key European and world players to solve the textile waste problem by transforming “waste” into a resource and to boost textile circular business models at large scale. The completed TES has accessed critical information on solving the European waste problem. It is estimated that to reach a collection rate from 18 to 26 percent by 2030, 7 billion euro will be needed. Once matured and scaled, the textile recycling industry could become a profitable industry with a total market size of 6-8 billion € and around 15,000 direct new jobs by 2030. As a first step the ReHubs Initiative announces different actions forwards, including projects on this pathway, which one is to transform textile waste into feedstock.

TEXAID has been supporting ReHubs since the start and contributed significantly involved to the Business Council and the Steering Committee of the initiative. As strongly committed industry leader TEXAID is taking the lead on the project to transform textile waste into feedstock for recycling processes. In order to handle the increasing quantities of post-consumer textile waste a massive scale up of sorting and preparation for recycling of used textiles is needed. TEXAID is committed to lead the work on developing new technologies and building up additional capacities for the handling and preparing of textile waste for textile recycling in Europe. In a first phase this involves the built up of a new sorting and pre-processing facility with the capacity of 50’00 tons p.a. by 2024.

More information:
ReHubs Texaid
Source:

TEXAID

Euratex
24.06.2022

EURATEX’s ReHubs initiative: Fiber-to-fiber recycling

The ReHubs initiative brings together key European and world players to solve the European textile waste problem by transforming “waste” into a resource, and to boost textile circular business model at large scale.

This collaboration is set to turn the societal textile waste issue into a business opportunity and to fulfil the EU ambitions of the Green Deal, of the mandatory texile waste collection by end 2024 and the transition into Circular Economy.

In 2020 EURATEX launched the ReHubs initiative to promote collaboration across the extended textile value chain and considering all perspectives on chemicals, fibers making, textiles making, garments production, retail and distribution, textiles waste collection, sorting and recycling.

In June 2022 ReHubs completes a Techno Economic master Study (TES) which researches critical information on the feedstock (textile waste) data, on technology, organizational and financial needs to recycle 2.5 million tons of textile waste by 2030 and to effectively launch the ReHubs.

The ReHubs initiative brings together key European and world players to solve the European textile waste problem by transforming “waste” into a resource, and to boost textile circular business model at large scale.

This collaboration is set to turn the societal textile waste issue into a business opportunity and to fulfil the EU ambitions of the Green Deal, of the mandatory texile waste collection by end 2024 and the transition into Circular Economy.

In 2020 EURATEX launched the ReHubs initiative to promote collaboration across the extended textile value chain and considering all perspectives on chemicals, fibers making, textiles making, garments production, retail and distribution, textiles waste collection, sorting and recycling.

In June 2022 ReHubs completes a Techno Economic master Study (TES) which researches critical information on the feedstock (textile waste) data, on technology, organizational and financial needs to recycle 2.5 million tons of textile waste by 2030 and to effectively launch the ReHubs.

EURATEX’s ReHubs initiative plans to pursue fiber-to-fiber recycling for 2.5 million tons of textile waste by 2030
According ReHubs Techno Economic Master Study (TES), the textile recycling industry could generate in Europe around 15,000 direct new jobs by 2030, and increase need for nearshoring and reshoring of textile manufacturing.

The textile recycling industry in Europe could reach economic, social and environmental benefits for €3.5 billion to €4.5 billion by 2030
“Transform Waste into Feedstock” announced as first project supported by the ReHubs, and aiming at building up a first 50,000 tons capacity facility by 2024.

Europe has a 7-7.5 million tons textile waste problem, of which only 30-35% is collected today.  

Based on the ambitious European Waste law, all EU Member States must separately collect the textile waste in 2 years and half. While some countries are designing schemes to face the waste collection challenge, currently no large-scale plan exist to process the waste.

The largest source of textile waste (85%) comes from private households and approximately 99% of the textile waste was made using virgin fibers.

Euratex  assesses that to reach a fiber-to-fiber recycling rate of around 18 to 26 percent by 2030, a capital expenditure investment in the range of 6 billion € to 7 billion € will be needed, particularly to scale up sufficient sorting and processing infrastructure. The economic, social, and environmental value which could be realized, potentially total an annual impact of €3.5-4.5 billion by 2030.

Once matured and scaled, the textile recycling industry could become a profitable industry with a total market size of 6-8 billion € and around 15,000 direct new jobs by 2030.

Next steps of the ReHubs initiative

  • A European textile recycling roadmap proposing Objectives and Key Results to recycle fiber-to-fiber 2.5 million of textile waste by 2030
  • A leading collaboration hub with large players and SMEs from across an extended European textile recycling value chain
  • A first concrete portfolio of 4 launching projects:
    - Transform textile waste into feedstock
    - Increase the adoption of mechanically recycled fibers in the value chain
    - Expand capacity by solving technical challenges for thermo-mechanical textiles recycling
    - Create capsule collection with post-consumer recycled products

The 1st project addresses current sorting technologies which have limits to identify materials with sufficient accuracy for the subsequent circular recycling processes. The “Transform Waste into Feedstock” project will focus on further developing and scaling such sorting technologies. The project group led by Texaid AG aims on building up a first 50,000 tons facility by the end 2024.

Source:

Euratex

Texaid
15.06.2022

TEXAID supports the Swiss textile recycling ecosystem with professional collecting and sorting of textiles

TEXAID as a professional collector and sorter with roots in Switzerland contributes to this ecosystem to enable the textile-to-textile recycling.  The creation of Swiss Textile Recycling Ecosystem marks a key milestone in the upscaling of Worn Again Technologies’ recycling process technology with technology scale-up partner Sulzer Chemtech in Winterthur. It also supports its ambition to create a circular economy where non-reusable, hard-to-recycle textiles can be reintroduced into supply chains to become new fibers.

To cause a paradigm shift in the fashion industry and realize true circularity requires all members of the value chain to be on the same page and working towards the same goals. The Swiss Textile Recycling Ecosystem is a network comprising fabric and textile manufacturers, waste collectors and sorters, as well as retailers, brand owners and technology providers – all coordinated by Swiss Textiles. All these parties will cooperate to make their shared vision of a more sustainable fashion industry a reality, where used textiles can be recycled into new textiles.

TEXAID as a professional collector and sorter with roots in Switzerland contributes to this ecosystem to enable the textile-to-textile recycling.  The creation of Swiss Textile Recycling Ecosystem marks a key milestone in the upscaling of Worn Again Technologies’ recycling process technology with technology scale-up partner Sulzer Chemtech in Winterthur. It also supports its ambition to create a circular economy where non-reusable, hard-to-recycle textiles can be reintroduced into supply chains to become new fibers.

To cause a paradigm shift in the fashion industry and realize true circularity requires all members of the value chain to be on the same page and working towards the same goals. The Swiss Textile Recycling Ecosystem is a network comprising fabric and textile manufacturers, waste collectors and sorters, as well as retailers, brand owners and technology providers – all coordinated by Swiss Textiles. All these parties will cooperate to make their shared vision of a more sustainable fashion industry a reality, where used textiles can be recycled into new textiles.

TEXAID as a stakeholder in the Swiss Textile Recycling Ecosystem and as leading textile recycling company with over 40 years of experience will support the initiative through collecting, sorting, pre-processing and providing pre- and post-consumer feedstock to the Demonstration Plant. At its headquarters in Schattdorf (CH), TEXAID will investigate possibilities to automate the sorting and pre-processing of textile feedstock for recycling. Currently, TEXAID processes more than 80,000 tons of end-of-use textiles and footwear every year all over Europe and the US.

More information:
Texaid Sulzer textile recycling
Source:

Texaid

Photo: Texaid
07.06.2022

TEXAID enables Textile-to-Textile Recycling

As a leading company in the collecting, sorting, reselling and recycling of post-consumer textile waste, TEXAID has enabled the recycling of post-consumer textile waste into new textiles and clothing. After two years of development, the company has developed a fabric including 50 % of post-consumer textile waste from used clothing, collected and prepared for recycling by TEXAID.

Today’s linear system of «take – make – waste» needs to change. New textiles are produced, used and discarded instead of putting them to a second use. The production of new textiles requires natural resources that are limited, and the current system has a significant negative impact on our planet. The transition to a circular system, where garments are kept in use for longer, is an opportunity to harness untapped potential around customer loyalty, economic growth, and ecological sustainability.

To move away from the linear system and enable products to be made out of post-consumer textile waste, TEXAID invested in the textile-to-textile recycling and product development.

As a leading company in the collecting, sorting, reselling and recycling of post-consumer textile waste, TEXAID has enabled the recycling of post-consumer textile waste into new textiles and clothing. After two years of development, the company has developed a fabric including 50 % of post-consumer textile waste from used clothing, collected and prepared for recycling by TEXAID.

Today’s linear system of «take – make – waste» needs to change. New textiles are produced, used and discarded instead of putting them to a second use. The production of new textiles requires natural resources that are limited, and the current system has a significant negative impact on our planet. The transition to a circular system, where garments are kept in use for longer, is an opportunity to harness untapped potential around customer loyalty, economic growth, and ecological sustainability.

To move away from the linear system and enable products to be made out of post-consumer textile waste, TEXAID invested in the textile-to-textile recycling and product development.

Collaboration enables recycling
After two years of research, product development, and most important, building partnerships in the value chain, TEXAID has been able to develop a fabric made of 100 % recycled fiber in close collaboration with our value chain partners.

The fabric is a blend of 50 % post-consumer textile waste that TEXAID has collected in Germany and Switzerland. White cotton textiles which cannot be worn, have been sorted out in a sorting facility in Apolda, Germany. The other 50% is made from ocean-bound plastic waste which is plastic with a high risk of entering the ocean which has been saved and recycled by Unifi. The fabric and bag have been produced in Italy. The cotton material has been shredded by Marchi & Fildi in Biella, IT, who then spun the recycled cotton and recycled polyester fibers into a yarn. This yarn has been woven into a fabric by Tessitura Casoni.T.F.C.

Through this proof of concept, it has been showcased that making fabrics of 100 % recycled content and with 50 % of post-consumer textiles is possible. TEXAID is looking for strong industry partners to push high-value textile to textile recycling technologies in joint projects like these.

More information:
Texaid Recycling
Source:

Texaid

Tearing Line Foto: Andritz
20.05.2022

ANDRITZ at TECHTEXTIL 2022

International technology group ANDRITZ will be presenting its innovative nonwovens production and textile solutions at Techtextil in Frankfurt from June 21 to 24. The ANDRITZ product portfolio covers state-of-the-art nonwovens and textile production technologies, such as air-through bonding, airlay, needlepunch, spunlace, spunbond, wetlaid/WetlaceTM, converting, textile finishing, recycling, and natural fiber processing. For Techtextil, special focus lies on technologies for textile recycling, needlepunch, airlay, wetlaid glass fibers and textile calendering.

International technology group ANDRITZ will be presenting its innovative nonwovens production and textile solutions at Techtextil in Frankfurt from June 21 to 24. The ANDRITZ product portfolio covers state-of-the-art nonwovens and textile production technologies, such as air-through bonding, airlay, needlepunch, spunlace, spunbond, wetlaid/WetlaceTM, converting, textile finishing, recycling, and natural fiber processing. For Techtextil, special focus lies on technologies for textile recycling, needlepunch, airlay, wetlaid glass fibers and textile calendering.

TEXTILE RECYCLING TECHNOLOGIES BASED ON TEARING
With the acquisition of ANDRITZ Laroche SAS, ANDRITZ has expanded its product portfolio to include airlay and recycling technology as well as bast fiber processing technologies. Complete recycling lines for post-consumer and industrial textile waste to produce fibers for re-spinning and/or nonwoven end-uses are one focus of this product range. Customer awareness and regulations are forcing clothing brands to recycle their textile waste in their own products. Recycled fibers can also be used in the nonwovens industry for various applications, for example in the automotive industry, for insulation, mattresses, and furniture felts.

ANDRITZ Laroche offers a complete process range of tearing lines from 50 up to 3,000 kg/h, which can be used for almost all types of pre/post-consumer textile waste. The aim is to preserve the character of the original fibers, for example cotton, by maximizing fiber length, strength and feel.

Source:

Andritz AG

Photo: Dibella b.v.
24.03.2022

Textile Service Industry: New cooperative brings closed chain closer

Five players in the textile service industry announce the establishment of Cibutex (Circular Business Textiles). This new cooperative is dedicated to the recycling and recovery of fibres from discarded textiles. Cibutex wants to contribute to a circular textile chain through cooperation in the whole sector.

Five players in the textile service industry announce the establishment of Cibutex (Circular Business Textiles). This new cooperative is dedicated to the recycling and recovery of fibres from discarded textiles. Cibutex wants to contribute to a circular textile chain through cooperation in the whole sector.

The textile service has been implementing key Circular Economy solutions for some time: rental, care, repair and reuse of textiles for professional use. "As an industry, we are in a position to delve even deeper into the world of the circular economy. Every linen rental company has many of the same products, which go through the same process every time: the textiles are washed, sorted and collected again after the period of use. After many washes, the textiles are rejected. With this rejected textile, we see a unique opportunity to finally put the idea of a closed textile chain into practice. The used textiles that have reached the end of their useful life can be recycled on an industrial scale and the fibre raw materials can be recovered to make new textiles. We want to exploit this potential to the full by founding Cibutex, a cooperative for all textile service providers in Europe," says Cibutex director Jan Lamme, explaining the background of the unique project.

Cross-competitive goal
The founders of Cibutex are four well-known, competing textile service companies and one supply partner: Blycolin Textile Services (Zaltbommel, NL), Dibella (Aalten), Edelweiss Groep (The Hague), Lamme Textile Management (Amsterdam, NL) and Nedlin (Elsloo, NL). The companies have deliberately joined forces in order to implement sustainability in textiles and clothing by means of closed material cycles throughout the sector.

"Important resources are hidden in our B2B used textiles. We want to recover these in cooperation with relevant recycling companies and thus promote textile recycling as demanded by the EU Commission. We have come together to achieve sufficient critical mass to determine the final recycling of our discarded laundry, with the goal of moving from textiles to textiles," says co-founder Luuk de Win (Nedlin).

Sustainable eco-balance
"By recycling the raw materials of our used textiles, we contribute to reducing the social, environmental and climate impacts of the textile industry related to cultivation and production, and this leads to a long-term improvement of the ecological footprint of our industry," adds co-founder Marc van Boekholt (Blycolin).

Increasing value
To make the final transformation step of the circular economic model "textile service" a success, any European textile service company can become a member of Cibutex. The cooperative takes care of the collection, transport to the recycling partners and remuneration for the old textiles, which are now limited to bed linen, table linen and bath linen. In the future, however, the group wants to develop solutions for other textiles as well. For example, the recycling of workwear is also on the agenda. The founders of Cibutex agree that this too is a treasure trove of resources that must be addressed.

 

Source:

Dibella b.v.

Photo: ANDRITZ
22.02.2022

ANDRITZ at Inlegmash 2022 in Russia

ANDRITZ will be presenting its innovative solutions for nonwovens production and textile manufacturing at INLEGMASH 2022 in Moscow, Russia, from March 14 to 17.

AIRLAY TECHNOLOGY
Protecting the environment and conserving natural resources require new technologies. In the textile-related industries, the current challenge is to develop industrially and economically viable solutions to use eco-friendly fibers in nonwovens. ANDRITZ focuses on the airlay nonwoven application for hemp fibers (used in mattress production, insulation, ...) and also geotextile end uses.

ANDRITZ will be presenting its innovative solutions for nonwovens production and textile manufacturing at INLEGMASH 2022 in Moscow, Russia, from March 14 to 17.

AIRLAY TECHNOLOGY
Protecting the environment and conserving natural resources require new technologies. In the textile-related industries, the current challenge is to develop industrially and economically viable solutions to use eco-friendly fibers in nonwovens. ANDRITZ focuses on the airlay nonwoven application for hemp fibers (used in mattress production, insulation, ...) and also geotextile end uses.

TEXTILE RECYCLING TECHNOLOGIES
ANDRITZ Laroche is a leading supplier of fiber processing technologies such as opening, blending, and dosing, airlay web forming, textile waste recycling, and decortication of bast fibers. One focus of this product range lies on complete recycling lines for post-consumer and industrial textile waste to produce fibers for re-spinning and/or nonwoven end uses. ANDRITZ will present recycling technologies for end-of-life textile products that can be used in multiple applications, such as automotive, insulation, mattresses, and furniture felts.

Customer awareness and regulations are pushing apparel brands to recycle their textile waste and use the recycled textile fibers in their own products. To support ANDRITZ customers, a team with process know-how is available to conduct customized trials in our advanced technical center located at the ANDRITZ Laroche facilities in Cours, France.

BAST FIBERS
For the demanding Russian market for technologies based on bast fibers, ANDRITZ will present innovative products and the valorization of bast fibers, in particular hemp.
ANDRITZ Laroche is a player in the textile waste recycling sector, with airlay nonwoven technologies but also bast fiber decortication and cottonizing lines.

These eco-friendly fibers are used to spin yarn mixed with cotton, saving cotton as raw material, which reduces the consumption of water, pesticides applied in its cultivation and chemicals used during the dyeing and finishing processes.

More information:
Andritz Inlegmash nonwovens Recycling
Source:

ANDRITZ AG

ANDRITZ delivers tearing line to Sasia Photo: ANDRITZ
Miguel Silva, CEO of Sasia, in front of the newly installed seven-cylinder Jumbo tearing line
15.02.2022

ANDRITZ delivers tearing line to Sasia

In January 2022, international technology group ANDRITZ successfully started up its latest-generation tearing line for spinning grade fibers delivered to Sasia at its Ribeirão premises, Portugal.

The scope of supply includes a seven-cylinder Jumbo tearing machine dedicated to spinning grade fibers. As the first of its kind in Portugal, the machine contains the latest ANDRITZ Laroche innovation for fiber opening, featuring a new-generation pinning configuration.

ANDRITZ has worked closely with Sasia for more than half a century, offering both cutting-edge solutions for recycling as well as every possible fine-tuning customization to support Sasia’s goals. Sasia’s plant now has four state-of-the-art ANDRITZ Laroche tearing lines.

A pioneer in the textile recycling industry since its foundation in 1952, Sasia is engaged in the circular economy with the aim of reducing textile waste by turning it into usable raw material again, increasing ability to compete as well as promoting innovation and sustainability.

In January 2022, international technology group ANDRITZ successfully started up its latest-generation tearing line for spinning grade fibers delivered to Sasia at its Ribeirão premises, Portugal.

The scope of supply includes a seven-cylinder Jumbo tearing machine dedicated to spinning grade fibers. As the first of its kind in Portugal, the machine contains the latest ANDRITZ Laroche innovation for fiber opening, featuring a new-generation pinning configuration.

ANDRITZ has worked closely with Sasia for more than half a century, offering both cutting-edge solutions for recycling as well as every possible fine-tuning customization to support Sasia’s goals. Sasia’s plant now has four state-of-the-art ANDRITZ Laroche tearing lines.

A pioneer in the textile recycling industry since its foundation in 1952, Sasia is engaged in the circular economy with the aim of reducing textile waste by turning it into usable raw material again, increasing ability to compete as well as promoting innovation and sustainability.

This order not only underlines ANDRITZ’s position as the leading supplier worldwide of textile recycling lines, but also highlights its ability to bring continuous improvement with sustainable solutions and versatility to its customers.

Source:

ANDRITZ AG

03.02.2022

Lenzing’s new prize for research projects on ethical and sustainable fashion

The Lenzing Group will present the Young Scientist Award for outstanding research in the field of fibers and textiles for the first time in 2022. The Dornbirn Global Fiber Congress (GFC Dornbirn) is an ideal platform for the recently launched research competition. Bachelor’s and master’s degree students will have the opportunity to submit their scientific work in the categories of fashion and the circular economy, textile recycling and the innovative use of biobased fibers to a jury of well-known industry experts.

The jury consists of Karla Magruder (Founder of Acceleration Circularity), Friedericke von Wedel-Parlow (Beneficial Design Institute Berlin) and Dieter Eichinger (Head of Standardization and Innovation, Secretary-General of BISFA). The winning project will receive a prize of EUR 5,000. The aim is to promote the students’ work and create a platform for networking with the textile and fiber industry.

The Lenzing Group will present the Young Scientist Award for outstanding research in the field of fibers and textiles for the first time in 2022. The Dornbirn Global Fiber Congress (GFC Dornbirn) is an ideal platform for the recently launched research competition. Bachelor’s and master’s degree students will have the opportunity to submit their scientific work in the categories of fashion and the circular economy, textile recycling and the innovative use of biobased fibers to a jury of well-known industry experts.

The jury consists of Karla Magruder (Founder of Acceleration Circularity), Friedericke von Wedel-Parlow (Beneficial Design Institute Berlin) and Dieter Eichinger (Head of Standardization and Innovation, Secretary-General of BISFA). The winning project will receive a prize of EUR 5,000. The aim is to promote the students’ work and create a platform for networking with the textile and fiber industry.

The Austrian Fibers Institute is the organizer of the 61st Dornbirn Global Fiber Congress on a not-for-profit basis. The event, due to take place from September 14 to 16, 2022, will offer an ideal setting for the presentation of the Young Scientist Award prize.

You can read more about the Young Scientist Award and the submission in the attached document.

CCF2022 New Opportunities for Cellulose Fibres in Replacing Plastics
Session "Recycling and Other Alternative Feedstocks"
29.12.2021

New Opportunities for Cellulose Fibres in Replacing Plastics

  • Session "Recycling and Other Alternative Feedstocks"

Cellulose fibres are a true material miracle as they offer a steadily expanding, broad range of applications. Meanwhile markets are driven by technological developments and policy frameworks, especially bans and restrictions on plastics, as well as an increasing number of sustainability requirements. The  presentations will provide valuable information on the various use-opportunities for cellulosic fibres through a policy overview, a special session on sustainability, recycling and alternative feedstocks, as well as the latest developments in pulp, cellulosic fibres and yarns. In addition, examples of non-wovens,  packaging and composites will offer a look beyond the horizon of conventional application fields.

  • Session "Recycling and Other Alternative Feedstocks"

Cellulose fibres are a true material miracle as they offer a steadily expanding, broad range of applications. Meanwhile markets are driven by technological developments and policy frameworks, especially bans and restrictions on plastics, as well as an increasing number of sustainability requirements. The  presentations will provide valuable information on the various use-opportunities for cellulosic fibres through a policy overview, a special session on sustainability, recycling and alternative feedstocks, as well as the latest developments in pulp, cellulosic fibres and yarns. In addition, examples of non-wovens,  packaging and composites will offer a look beyond the horizon of conventional application fields.

The fourth session, "Recycling and other alternative raw materials", will cover topics ranging from textile recycling - both cotton and regenerated cellulose fibres - to the use of hemp shives as raw material. Self-initiated cooperation and waste management pave the way to a fully closed European material loop where textile waste is collected, recycled and reprocessed into new raw materials.

The speakers will demonstrate the importance of cooperation in recycling fabrics already in circulation, perfectly following the topics and discussions of the previous conference day.

  • Heikki Hassi - SciTech-Service (FI):  Textile Recycling and MMCFs; Systemic Challenges, Market Opportunities and Advancing Technologies
  • Valerie Langer - Canopy (CA): The Perfect Storm – A Five Year Feedstock Shift Forecast
  • Helena Claesson - Södra (SE): Two is better than one – Lenzing and Södra together Face the Challenge of Recycling of Textiles
  • Marina Crnoja-Cosic - Kelheim Fibres (DE) and Harald Cavalli-Björkman - re:newcell (SE): Sustainable Cellulosic Fibres from Recycled Raw Materials – A Solution for Europe
  • Frank Meister - Thüringisches Institut für Textil- und Kunststoff-Forschung (DE): Lyohemp Fibres Made of Dissolving Pulp Based on Hemp Shives
  • Miguel Sanchis-Sebastiá - ShareTex (SE): Expanding Textile Recycling Beyond Cotton: Innovations to Recycle Regenerated Cellulose Fibers