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FULLY AUTOMATED QUALITY CONTROL MAKES HIGH-VISIBILITY CLOTHING EVEN SAFER Photo: LEEROY Agency, Pixabay
10.03.2020

FULLY AUTOMATED QUALITY CONTROL MAKES HIGH-VISIBILITY CLOTHING EVEN SAFER

High-visibility or “high-vis” clothing provides many people safety in their day-to-day work. Fraunhofer IGD has paired with textile service provider MEWA to develop an automated system for inspecting the quality of this clothing faster and more reliably, and thereby guarantee safety. Both companies have filed a joint patent for the system.

High-vis and protective clothing, like the kind worn by road workers, must meet certain standards prescribed by law for the safety of the wearer. Employers are liable for meeting these legal safety standards. On behalf of MEWA, the Fraunhofer Institute for Computer Graphics Research IGD has developed a system to automate and optimize quality testing.

High-visibility or “high-vis” clothing provides many people safety in their day-to-day work. Fraunhofer IGD has paired with textile service provider MEWA to develop an automated system for inspecting the quality of this clothing faster and more reliably, and thereby guarantee safety. Both companies have filed a joint patent for the system.

High-vis and protective clothing, like the kind worn by road workers, must meet certain standards prescribed by law for the safety of the wearer. Employers are liable for meeting these legal safety standards. On behalf of MEWA, the Fraunhofer Institute for Computer Graphics Research IGD has developed a system to automate and optimize quality testing.

Integrated optical quality control
Fraunhofer IGD has developed its quality control system with the assistance of MEWA Textil-Service AG and it will be used daily at two sites starting in 2020.
After being washed and dried, the articles of clothing run through a special photographing box on hangers and pictures are taken of the front and back. Fraunhofer software analyzes these pictures in real time and sends to the result to control software, which sends the clothing to other stations in the quality control process. The results of the inspection are saved in the system a valuable collection of data that is made available to MEWA in order to analyze and optimize the system as well as internal processes, such as the washing process.

Faster and more precise inspection
The high-vis clothing is inspected manually for quality by qualified employees. They inspect the washed articles of clothing for a number of aspects, including brightness and colorfastness of the high-visibility color as well as the integrity of the reflective strips. The automated solution by Fraunhofer IGD can assist employees with this visual inspection while speeding up the process at the same time. “With the help of the automated analysis, we can ensure to an even greater degree and with greater precision that the high-vis clothing meets strict safety standards even after being washed,” said Uwe Schmidt, head of engineering at MEWA. At MEWA’s locations in Schönbuch near Stuttgart and Gross Kienitz near Berlin, Fraunhofer IGD’s system is now being used in trials, with implementation at more locations being planned.

Inspection system is applicable to other industries
Fraunhofer IGD’s inspection system is available for implementation as a software module. This technology could also support other industries: Automated returns classification for the mail-order trade or use in textile recycling would be conceivable, though the technology would need to be seamlessly integrated into existing systems and processes. The development team at Fraunhofer IGD is currently working on quality controls that use not only photographs but also video recordings as well as on analyzing the recordings in real time. The significantly increased number of product views will cover every aspect of the inspection with even greater precision.

About IGD
Fraunhofer IGD is the international leading research institution for applied visual computing — image- and model-based information technology that combines computer graphics and computer vision. In simple terms, it is the ability to turn information into images and to extract information from images. All technological solutions by Fraunhofer IGD and its partners are based on visual computing.

In computer graphics, people generate, edit, and process images, graphs, and multi-dimensional models in a computeraided manner. Examples are applications of virtual and simulated reality.

Computer vision is the discipline that teaches computers how to “see”. In the process, a machine sees its environment by means of a camera and processes information using software. Typical applications can be found in the field of Augmented Reality.

Photo: Messe Frankfurt Exhibition GmbH / Jens Liebchen
25.02.2020

AUTOMATION PROGRESSES ALONG THE LAUNDRY SECTOR

The productivity of a laundry depends on unbroken process flows and transparent commodity streams. Thanks to increasing digitalisation and consistent integration of data, the through-put of textiles in laundries is being continually improved. The solutions required for automation in the sector are therefore a high priority at Texcare International, from 20 to 24 June in Frankfurt am Main.
 

The productivity of a laundry depends on unbroken process flows and transparent commodity streams. Thanks to increasing digitalisation and consistent integration of data, the through-put of textiles in laundries is being continually improved. The solutions required for automation in the sector are therefore a high priority at Texcare International, from 20 to 24 June in Frankfurt am Main.
 
The be-all and end-all for the laundry sector is the ability to monitor the quantity, quality and storage location of the textiles that are circulating on site, at all times. The data collected form the basis for precise price calculations, throw up any weak points in the system and serve to provide documentation for third parties. But it is only when all the machinery and plant involved in a given textile service are interlinked on a single network that the logistics of the laundry service run seamlessly, with minimal down-time of the machinery, reduced quantities in circulation and the resultant increase in productivity that is closely associated with it.

Transparent tracking for each individual laundry item
Automation in the processing of workwear is already well advanced. As the dirty laundry is sorted on arrival, each item is recorded using an identification system such as a barcode or RFID technology. From this moment on, all the stages that the textiles undergo are controlled. ‘Readers’ or ‘gates’ on the premises enable each item to be recorded as it progresses through the system, right up to the point of order picking; and they monitor whether an item is sent to a repair station or directed into storage. In addition, high-frequency transponders (UHF tags) can monitor the movements of laundry items outside of the laundry: in hospitals, for instance, identification systems have been installed, which record the despatch and return of apparel and enable an extensive process of textile management via data transfer procedures.

Robots for the soiled laundry area
This already high degree of automation in a workwear laundry facility is, however, capable of still further refinement. Artificial intelligence can simplify the ‘dirty’ work in the reception area: robots separate and sort the soiled clothing and x-ray machines, cameras and metal detectors are used to identify any foreign bodies. The advantages of such systems are particularly in evidence in hospital laundries: medical instruments, which regularly find their way into the laundry bags, are automatically separated from the clothing, thus minimising damage to the items themselves and to the machinery. The useful life of the textiles is extended and costs are reduced. Moreover, there is no danger of infection for the staff.

Real-time laundry processes
Whilst individual control and traceability are already widespread in the professional treatment of work apparel, when it comes to flat linen, often only generalisations about quantity, quality and storage location for the textiles are possible. “In order to assess a business’s efficiency, calculate prices and efficiently control processes and procedures, laundries need reliable figures […],” observes Martin Rauch, CSO of the Jensen Group, who operate on a worldwide basis.

In the pursuit of automated production, ultra-modern information and communications technologies assume a key role. They synchronise the machines involved in a given production process and facilitate communication and cooperation between plant, product and the human being. This way, you get self-organising, flexible production with unbroken processes and high levels of utilisation of equipment. With the synchronisation of commodity streams and information flow in the laundry, all items arrive at the right processing station at the appropriate time. A central database controls all the processes in the entire laundry, regulates the machinery and the linked sub-systems, chooses the correct processing programmes and optimises machine use.
 
Data accompanies the laundry throughout
“Trolleys of laundry standing around, waiting times at the machines, excessive buffering and time spent searching for items are all lost capital […],” says Matthias Schäfer, who is responsible for product management, laundry logistics / smart laundry at Kannengiesser (Vlotho).

When data and goods flows are successfully synchronised throughout a flat-linen laundry, each washing station contributes its information along with that of other stations, right from the initial sorting of the soiled linen through to the folding machines. The laundry can, therefore, be monitored throughout the entire operation, as the information from each station is sent on with the item, either automatically or – after the drier – in the form of bar-coded labels. (“Stabilisation of production through the synchronisation of material and production flows.”)

RFID identification systems do indeed enable complete transparency to be built into the passage of goods through the various stages, as each chip or tag carries the necessary information for each individual item. In view of the high cost of the transponders, ‘chipping’ of flat linen is, however, currently an option for only very few laundries. So the textile care sector is waiting on more economical, more functionally reliable solutions from the machinery and plant manufacturers.
 
Smart to the very end of the chain
Further potential for automation resides in the picking and packaging. Collecting together items for delivery manually is subject to error and that leads to customer complaints. With intelligent storage facilities and transport solutions, smart stacking management and the networking of equipment with the laundry’s information system, order picking becomes simpler, quicker and more reliable. To ensure that the integration can function, modern machines are equipped with interfaces, so that each new installation can be linked seamlessly into a laundry’s existing system. The same goes for accessory machines, which exchange all the important information relating to preparation and repair online.

User friendly apps
Digital developments are not only large scale: they are to be found on a smaller scale as well. For launderettes, too, apps provide important information on the status of the equipment, enable operators to see what is going on, even at considerable distances, as well as being able to provide digital payment models. Moreover, in heavily used laundry facilities, they can take on the entire job of time management, as Andreas Barduna, Head of Business Management, Miele Professional (Gütersloh) is very aware.

At Texcare International, from 20 to 24 June 2020, machinery and plant manufacturers from all over the world will be presenting their smart solutions for the laundries of tomorrow. The focus will be very much on artificial intelligence and smart information systems, which will help maximize the degree of automation within the sector.

GOTTFRIED SCHMIDT OHG (c) Weitblick, Gottfried Schmidt OHG
18.02.2020

WE HAVE OUR PRINCIPLES ... WEITBLICK | GOTTFRIED SCHMIDT OHG

WORKWEAR AS A SUSTAINABLE TEXTILE LOOP!

WEITBLICK | Gottfried Schmidt OHG with about 130 members of staff in Bavaria and more than 1,000 employees in European production plants is one of the leading German textile companies in the workwear and corporate fashion segments. Originally founded 1931 in Frankfurt / Main, the traditional family-owned company, now in its fourth generation, achieves a medium sized eight figure turnover.

Quick decision-making processes, a familiar atmosphere, production exclusively in Europe, customer-specific innovations and comprehensive sustainability concepts - what does the workwear professional do differently than others?

Sales Director Philipp Hartmann (Sales Support and Customer Service) and Janine Gonglach, Head of Marketing, together with Managing Director Felix Blumenauer, responsible for Marketing, Sales, Logistics and Controlling faced the questions of Textination.

WORKWEAR AS A SUSTAINABLE TEXTILE LOOP!

WEITBLICK | Gottfried Schmidt OHG with about 130 members of staff in Bavaria and more than 1,000 employees in European production plants is one of the leading German textile companies in the workwear and corporate fashion segments. Originally founded 1931 in Frankfurt / Main, the traditional family-owned company, now in its fourth generation, achieves a medium sized eight figure turnover.

Quick decision-making processes, a familiar atmosphere, production exclusively in Europe, customer-specific innovations and comprehensive sustainability concepts - what does the workwear professional do differently than others?

Sales Director Philipp Hartmann (Sales Support and Customer Service) and Janine Gonglach, Head of Marketing, together with Managing Director Felix Blumenauer, responsible for Marketing, Sales, Logistics and Controlling faced the questions of Textination.

Gottfried Schmidt OHG, a family company that will celebrate its 90th birthday next year, is considered as a professional when it comes to premium workwear. If you had to introduce yourself in 100 words to someone who doesn't know the company: What makes you unique?
Felix Blumenauer – Managing Director
We are a long-established family company that has reinvented itself again and again over the course of history. In the field of workwear, we stand for the highest quality across a wide range of industry segments and attach great importance to sustainability - this is also shown by our long-standing partners who produce our clothing in Europe. With our state-of-the-art logistics center, we prove that digitization and Industry 4.0 are not just buzzwords for us.   

In which markets and by which partners do you feel particularly challenged? And with which product innovations in the workwear sector do you think you can move the most?
Philipp Hartmann – Sales Director
Markets are changing faster and faster and that is a challenge per se. We want to continue to be reliable today and, in the future, that also means continuity for our partners. But how do we deal with ever new requirements from ever faster moving markets?
Focusing on the customer, we cannot remain in rigid structures. We at WEITBLICK achieve this through our corporate culture and our guidelines: courage, strength and confidence.
This culture holds our team together and this enables us to adapt structures more quickly. Due to our personal contact to our partners and our experience as a fourth-generation family business, we enjoy great trust in all markets and this assists us to make quick adjustments and changes without questioning our DNA.
The basis of our products is the quality of the materials used, the processing by a very well-trained staff in our own European production sites and, first and foremost, a team of experts who controls everything in-house from the fiber and the design idea to production and logistics and bring it all together under one roof. So, if you ask me whether all products will be flashing in the near future, the answer is: no. Our strength is the implementation of our customers' wishes and above all we put the brand, the CI of our customers, in the foreground on the product. Because a satisfied employee in the right workwear is the best business card for a company. So, if it should flash in the clothing in the near future, this is not a problem, but we realize ourselves much more concerned with our customer requirements around the products. Based on quality and sustainability we have been driving very well for a long time.

However, services, speed in logistics, controlling, order configurators and budget management as well as interface management are the actual innovations with which we convince our customers and partners today. For some time now, we have been relying on a team of employees who implements precisely these customer requirements across departments. For example, in addition to our own CI Workwear collection, a customer can also receive a protected customer shop from us, where employees can configure the coordinated collection and order according to a defined budget. The customer's purchasing and controlling departments have live insight into costs and inventories. The dispatch including personalization is RFID-controlled in Germany, picked on the carrier and sent all over the world. Does that sound innovative?

Tailor-made or solution for the major customer? The topic of individualization down to batch size 1 is gaining in importance today. How do you manage the balancing act between major customers and individual production - what does this mean for the processes of Gottfried Schmidt OHG? 
Philipp Hartmann – Sales Director
Why not the tailor-made solution for major and small customers? Until a few years ago, and even today in some cases, a customer’s logo in the colors red, green, blue and white was of course displayed by fabrics of the same color combined in a four-colored scheme. This is more or less a thing of the past. Nowadays, requests for different colors are additionally solved by the possibility of combining many articles. In doing so, we fall back on thousands of active articles of our own developments and a large selection of ingredients, fabrics and finishing options. CI collections can be produced very quickly in small quantities in our state-of-the-art production facilities. In one of our six European production plants, for example, we only manufacture made-to-measure orders from piece 1. This happens within very lean processes and just takes a few weeks.

At the same time, we have large capacities for the storage of our raw materials and a warehouse for prefabricated parts, which enables us to place them into stock for the customer. Companies are aware of the great importance of workwear and the partly missing transparency in processes or costs. Therefore, it is desirable to be able to order small quantities. We have access to dozens of wearer profiles and millions of wearers from almost all sectors and are able to combine this experience with today's requirements. I don't prefer the word "standard", but the fact is that we already offer our customers a wide range of articles and colors to choose from, as we are constantly releasing new collections for various industries. The processes, scrutinized with the possibilities of new tools and systems, are consistently adapted - the other way around. This enables us to work very automatically from small to large orders and thus process orders via our customer online shops or via interfaces with our customers' order portals. Order picking and logistics from piece 1 with the shipping method of your choice are no problem for us, because we have been operating the most modern logistics center in the industry since 2018.

With WEITBLICK you have chosen the look-and-feel of a German-language brand. What prompted you to take this step and what are the consequences for your international sales?
Janine Gonglach – Head of Marketing
The decision was made for WEITBLICK (Engl.: vision, foresightedness) because we always possessed it as a company. Not only the founder Gottfried Schmidt himself had shown vision or foresightedness. Each generation that followed also had and still has visions, that developed the company to what it is today. A company with thought leaders, doers, inventors, critics and perfectionists.
Also, in the future, we will meet the challenge of developing our products and our actions with foresightedness - for the continued existence of the company and for the benefit of our customers.

Philipp Hartmann – Sales Director
We serve a wide range of customers, from craft businesses to large global corporations. So, we have already been internationally active in previous generations. And the name has never been a limitation. Our employees in sales and customer service are trained accordingly, our documents and systems are multilingually available and maintained.

In which socially relevant subject areas do you see a particularly great need for innovation and action during the next 5 years? What is your assessment that your company will be able to offer solutions for this with its products?
Felix Blumenauer – Managing Director

We see a further growing importance of the topic of “sharing”. With our strong partners in professional service, we have been living this idea for many decades and see increasing importance in society. Clothing remains available in a cycle of the highest quality for many years - for us this is the sustainable counter trend to "fast fashion". In this context we offer digital solutions that satisfy our customers and our wearers and convince them, that WEITBLICK is the right choice.

We will act on these fields and consciously set the right accents – that’s how we understand corporate responsibility towards our employees and our customers.

For decades, the textile and clothing industry has been growing steadily worldwide. In terms of sustainability, to put it mildly, there is a rather mixed feedback for our industry. What is the Gottfried Schmidt OHG focusing on in order to meet its social responsibility?
Felix Blumenauer – Managing Director
We have long anchored sustainability in our company as one of the most important priorities in our strategy. This becomes apparent e.g. by the use of Fair-Trade cotton, which we bring to the market in large quantities together with other companies and suppliers in the industry. We think sustainability comprehensively. Each area of our company contributes to the fulfillment of corporate responsibility - towards our customers and our own employees.

There are various definitions for sustainability. Customers expect everything under this term - from climate protection to ecology, from local on-site production to the exclusion of child labor etc. What do you do to bring this term to life for your company and what seals or certifications do you rely on?
Felix Blumenauer – Managing Director
We have the highest standards in the entire supply chain, which we implement together with our partners and monitor closely. This includes fair production conditions in Europe with comparatively short distances, which are guaranteed by the internationally recognized SA 8000 seal. The avoidance of unnecessary packaging material, climate-neutral shipping and the reduction of plastic are also a matter of course for us. For example, we are currently working on using recycled polyester in the future. We are looking forward to the Green Button and want to qualify for this state seal of quality.

At WEITBLICK, you have chosen a consciously young form of communication. Whether Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, Pinterest or relevant business platforms - social media clearly take a central position in your media mix. This is not necessarily standard in the textile rental service. Why did you choose this form of addressing?
Janine Gonglach – Head of Marketing
For us, WEITBLICK - far-sightedness - also means “venturing something new”!
From my point of view, in the digital age, the question for companies is no longer whether social networks should be used or not, but only how and to what extent. With more than 3 billion people who are now represented in social media networks worldwide, we no longer speak of zeitgeist, but of a must-have in the marketing mix. Our communication follows the guiding principle: "We do not conduct a monologue, but an open dialogue at eye level." Social media achieve exactly that! 

Breaking new ground means willingness to make decisions, overcoming fears - and thus courage to fail. Not every project can succeed. In retrospect, which entrepreneurial decision are you particularly happy to have made?
Felix Blumenauer – Managing Director
The transformation of our company. With courage, strength and confidence, we managed to reposition our company almost completely within a very short period of time. This includes the modern umbrella brand WEITBLICK, which for us is also an obligation to our actions. But also, the growth that we have achieved in the past four years with around 40 new employees. We have built a new logistics center - with highly modern processes that are largely automated, e.g. with intelligent RFID technology. In doing so, we are trying to take all employees with us on this journey, which is not always easy but the right track. The positive thing about it is that our long-standing as well as our new employees work for us on their own responsibility and with enthusiasm.

The interview was conducted by Ines Chucholowius, CEO Textination GmbH

PromoTex Expo (c) PromoTex Expo
08.10.2019

Make your brand wearable - PromoTex Expo to enter second round in 2020

  • Sustainability at the Textile Campus
  • Make your shirt: Digital textile finishing process

It’s colourful, it’s loud and it shouts: “Make your brand wearable!” With its new claim PromoTex Expo brings together textile finishers and experts, signmakers, designers, promotional product distributors, agencies and marketeers to present their highlights in promotion, sports and workwear. The event will once again be held concurrently with PSI and viscom from 7 – 9 January 2020. Together these three trade shows – boasting optimised hall occupancy – form the World of Advertising and Selling.

  • Sustainability at the Textile Campus
  • Make your shirt: Digital textile finishing process

It’s colourful, it’s loud and it shouts: “Make your brand wearable!” With its new claim PromoTex Expo brings together textile finishers and experts, signmakers, designers, promotional product distributors, agencies and marketeers to present their highlights in promotion, sports and workwear. The event will once again be held concurrently with PSI and viscom from 7 – 9 January 2020. Together these three trade shows – boasting optimised hall occupancy – form the World of Advertising and Selling.

A total of 14.9 billion euros in sales are generated annually in Europe by the business with promotional items: This is shown by the "Industry Structure Analysis 2017-19", the first empirical study on the European promotional products industry. The structural data collected on markets, suppliers and retailers systematically and representatively covers the entire value chain.

The study shows: More than one third of the total European turnover is generated by micro-enterprises with fewer than 10 employees. Together with large companies with more than 250 employees, they form the main source of sales in our industry. Together they account for more than half of the turnover. Germany generated with total 3,5 billion Euro about 23 of the European annual business and is thus one of the top 10 nations in the European promotional products industry.
 
PromoTex Expo to move closer to PSI again
Exhibitors’ wishes and needs were centre stage when allocating hall space for this trio of trade shows. This is also why PromoTex Expo will move closer to PSI again occupying parts of Hall 12 in future. In exchange for this, floor space so far unexploited in the other halls will be used for selling. “On the one hand, this move allows us to preserve the independence of PromoTex Expo within this alliance and, on the other, to ensure the proximity with PSI called for by the market,” says Director Petra Lassahn accounting for this move and adding: “Upon the request of both exhibitors and visitors we will already be implementing this adjustment in 2020 and, hence, one year earlier than planned.”

viscom will find its new home in Hall 13. Two walkways create a direct connection between the two trade shows thereby ensuring optimum visitor flows. The trade show for visual communication will also be directly accessible via the entrances Ost and Nord-Ost. As a result, the tactile, textile and visual forms of communication will again be presented under the same roof and within even easier reach at the beginning of the year. As before, admission to all three trade shows will be exclusively restricted to qualified trade visitors and PSI members.
 
Sustainability a trend at the Textile Campus
In Hall 12 visitors to PromoTex Expo will find such familiar faces in this industry as TeeJays, Lynka, Vossen, Matterhorn, Regatta and MASCOT International A/S. However, new faces like stilfaser and the IGUANA GROUP will also feature, introducing their product highlights as part of the international trade show.

Alongside the exhibitors’ ranges an extensive line-up of side events will also convince visitors. Serving as a centre piece here will be the Textile Campus. In cooperation with sustainable companies, it will be shown how new workwear is created from plastic fished from the sea or how old clothes are turned into new promotional textiles. The focus is on ideas from innovative companies that use them to make production and trade fairer and ecological. On the catwalk adjacent to the campus, the participating exhibitors will present their latest collections to a wide audience.
 
Strolling along the fashion Boulevard
Visitors looking for innovations and directions in the fields of sports, career, promotion and leisure will find these at a glance at the new Boulevard. The corridor leads completely through the exhibition hall and shows the trends in a theme-oriented and staged way.

The production chain from design to finished product will be featured on the special area “Mach Dein Shirt/Make your Shirt” in Hall 13. Under the heading “Textil 4.0” this area will focus on Mass Customisation. IT experts and solutions providers will guide visitors through tomorrow’s buying process using a QR code. Once these have generated a print motif, they issue a print job and then follow their individual QR code on its way through the finishing process up to shipping. In an illustrative way, the linking of digital IT solutions with analogue finishing techniques will be demonstrated here, with the IT solution care of our curated partner Smake playing a key role. In the process, the synergies between tactile, textile and visual communications become apparent and with it the concept underlying this trade show triad.
          
About PromoTex Expo
All facets of Mass Customisation, smart clothes, sustainability in the textile chain as well as textile finishing as a service: these are the trend themes of PromoTex Expo. As a new information and knowledge platform for this industry the trade show for Promotion, Sports and Workwear in Düsseldorf is the central point of contact for international textile finishers, promotional product distributors, signmakers, designers, textile experts, retail and agencies. After its successful debut in January 2019 attended by 13,217 trade visitors from 39 nations, the forthcoming event will be held in Düsseldorf from 7 to 9 January 2020 – concurrently with the trade shows PSI – Leading European Trade Show of the Promotional Products Industry and viscom – European Trade Show for Visual Communication. Taken together they form Europe’s biggest trade show alliance for Advertising and Selling.

Photo: PIXABAY
11.12.2018

AZERBAIJAN'S TEXTILE AND SILK PRODUCTION IS ABOUT TO RESTART

  • Industrial park under construction

Baku (GTAI) - The Azerbaijani textile and silk industry is going to have a future again after a dramatic slump. Several initiatives are helping the traditional industry to make a fresh start.

Azerbaijan wants to revive its once strong textile, silk and clothing industry. In 1990, the sector still accounted for just under 18 percent of the total industrial production – in 2017 it was just 0.5 percent. Future investment activities will be determined by several initiatives. These include the implementation of programs for the production and processing of cotton and silk cocoons for semi-finished and finished goods, the establishment of an industrial park for light industry in Mingatchevir and the establishment of branches of the Azerkhalcha company for hand-woven carpets.

  • Industrial park under construction

Baku (GTAI) - The Azerbaijani textile and silk industry is going to have a future again after a dramatic slump. Several initiatives are helping the traditional industry to make a fresh start.

Azerbaijan wants to revive its once strong textile, silk and clothing industry. In 1990, the sector still accounted for just under 18 percent of the total industrial production – in 2017 it was just 0.5 percent. Future investment activities will be determined by several initiatives. These include the implementation of programs for the production and processing of cotton and silk cocoons for semi-finished and finished goods, the establishment of an industrial park for light industry in Mingatchevir and the establishment of branches of the Azerkhalcha company for hand-woven carpets.

New projects in cotton processing on the horizon
At the beginning of the 1980s, cotton cultivation boomed in the country with an annual harvest of more than 1 million tons of raw cotton. The collapse of the Soviet Union, the transformation crisis in the 1990s and general neglect almost brought the industry to a standstill. In 2015, the harvest reached a historic low of 35,000 tons of raw cotton.

But the turnaround has begun. In 2017, 207,000 tons of raw cotton were harvested (forecast for 2018: 250,000 to 260,000 tons). A downer is the low average yield of 1.52 tons per hectare (2017). The government announced increased support for soil irrigation and technical equipment for manufacturers. By 2022 the harvest is expected to rise up to 500,000 tons per year.

The "State Program for the Development of Cotton Growing in the period 2017 to 2022" adopted on July 13th 2017 is a guideline for the further development. Projects are planned for the renewal of existing and the construction of new cotton ginning mills and processing of cotton fibers into yarns, fabrics and finished products. By mid-2018 there were eight spinning mills in the country with a total annual capacity of 44,600 tons of yarn. Above all among the yarn producers in Uzbekistan are the companies Mingatschewir Textil, MKT Istehsalat Kommersiya, ASK Textil Sumgait and Azeripek (better known as Ipek Scheki).

Silk industry to be expanded
Since 2016 the silk industry, which came almost to a standstill, has now been on the move again. On November 27th 2017 the "State Program for the Development of Silkworm Breeding and Processing of Mulberry Silkworm Cocoons for the period 2017 to 2025" was adopted. The program defines projects to revitalize the sector. The annual production of cocoons is expected to rise to 6,000 tons by 2025, ensuring an annual production of up to 600 tons of raw silk. In 2017 244 tons of cocoons were produced after 71 tons in 2016 (forecasts for 2018 and 2019: about 500 and 1,000 tons respectively).

The modernization of the silk combinate Azeripek in Scheki is at the top of the project list. The contact organization is the Azerbaijan State Industrial Association, to which Azeripek and other companies are reporting (http://www.ask.gov.az). The construction of a new silk spinning mill with an annual capacity of 3,000 tons of yarn is planned.

Established in 1931 and later expanded the Silk Combine in Scheki was the flagship of the silk industry in the Soviet Union in the 1970s and 1980s with some 7,000 permanent employees. It produced up to 400 tons of raw silk per year and supplied over 100 factories with silk yarn and twist. Inefficient privatization, financial problems, lack of raw materials and sales difficulties repeatedly led to production stoppages. Today's capacities allow an annual production of up to 135 tons of raw silk only. As a result of technical problems, the factory is unable to produce finished fabrics.

Industrial park for light industry under construction
In the in 2016 established Industrial Park for Light Industry in Mingatchevir, nine factories for the production of textile and clothing products (cotton, acrylic and wool yarn, hosiery and apparel) and other light industry products (leather footwear and cosmetics) are to be built. The construction of more production facilities is planned. In February 2018 the company Textile Mingatchevir opened the first two factories in the industrial park. It intends to produce up to 20,000 tons of cotton and blended yarn annually. Capital expenditures were USD 46 million.

Azerkhalcha revives traditional carpet art
Azerkhalcha, the company for the production of hand-woven carpets, has an ambitious goal: 30 regional carpet weaving mills are to be established by 2020. By the end of 2017 ten branches have already been opened. A further 20 will be added in 2018 and 2019. Azerkhalcha was founded in 2016 on the initiative of the government. In 2018 and 2019, the state will invest around USD 22 million in the construction of new branches and a wool processing factory.

From 2020, approximately 5,000 employees will produce hand-woven carpets under the Azerbaijan Carpet label for domestic and foreign markets. The expansion plans for the production of hand-woven carpets result from the in 2018 adopted state program for the development of carpet art in Azerbaijan and the Nakhichevan Autonomous Republic for the years 2018 till 2022.

Azerbaijan offers opportunities as a production location
Azerbaijan can score with some advantages as a production location for the textile and silk industry as well as for the clothing industry. These include a sufficiently available and quickly trained labor force, low wage costs, tax and other preferences in industrial areas and good conditions for the sale of the goods.

Good sales opportunities result from the free trade agreements with the countries of the Commonwealth of Independent States and the export opportunities to Turkey. No import duties have to be paid for exports to these countries. Clothing manufacturers from EU countries with the intention of exporting to these countries can benefit from this. Several companies, especially from the Baltic States, are currently exploring their opportunities for a market entry.

The Azerbaijan Textile Industry Association sees a need for action on the part of the government with regard to the framework conditions for the domestic clothing manufacturers. For example, the tariff burden on imports of accessories such as adhesives, buttons and snap fasteners and zippers should significantly be reduced.

Leading manufacturers of apparel and other finished textile products include Baku Textile Factory (Baki Tekstil Fabriki), Accord Textil (Agstafa, part of the Accord Industrial Holding), Alyans Tekstil (Sumqayit), the apparel factory in the Gilan-Textile Park (Sumqayit), and Debet Uniform (Baku). The factories mainly produce workwear and outerwear.

More information:
GTAI Aserbaidschan Carpets
Source:

Uwe Stohbach, Germany Trade & Invest

www.gtai.de

“Toward Utopia”: Heimtextil presents the design trends for 2019/2010 (c) Heimtextil Trendbook
18.09.2018

“TOWARD UTOPIA”: HEIMTEXTIL PRESENTS THE DESIGN TRENDS FOR 2019/2010

With “Toward Utopia”, Heimtextil is setting the course for the new trend season 2019/2020. As part of the official Heimtextil Trend Preview on 4 September 2018 in Frankfurt am Main, London-based studio FranklinTill presented the design themes for the upcoming international trade fair for home and contract textiles (8-11 January 2019).

With “Toward Utopia”, Heimtextil is setting the course for the new trend season 2019/2020. As part of the official Heimtextil Trend Preview on 4 September 2018 in Frankfurt am Main, London-based studio FranklinTill presented the design themes for the upcoming international trade fair for home and contract textiles (8-11 January 2019).

In addition to the British trend researchers, Anne Marie Commandeur from the Stijlinstituut Amsterdam and Anja Bisgaard Gaede from SPOTT Trends & Business also participated in the forecast for perspectiverelated interior design, which applies globally. Together with the Heimtextil management team, they provided initial insights into future style worlds. Stefan Weil from Atelier Markgraph, the studio that designs the spatial staging of Heimtextil trends, gave a preview of the new “Trend Space' and emphasised the importance of spatial communication for Heimtextil.
 
The Heimtextil trends 2019/2020 describe a world in which we live according to new standards. We try to escape complex lifestyles and have a desire for deeper relationships, spiritual confirmation and greater meaning. “We live in an era of uncertainty and mistrust in the established order. As a reaction, we try to live a meaningful, conscious life based on positive relationships. We take responsibility for our lives and look for ways of life that fulfil our value system in search of a new utopia – a society that aims at promoting the well-being of all its citizens”, explains Caroline Till, co-founder of FranklinTill Studio. The search for new lifestyles in which mindfulness and sustainability play an important role will be the challenge of the coming decades.

“Toward Utopia” shows which individual routes we can take on the way to finding a modern utopia: those who seek temporary time-out from the internet to reconnect with nature and defy the elements (“Go off-grid”), while others escape from the real world into a virtual world (“Escape Reality”). Some withdraw and find security in pure, minimalist rooms (“Seek Sanctuary”). “Embrace Indulgence” offers a nostalgic answer to today’s uncertain times and surrounds us with beauty and luxury. And the unconditional hedonistic desire for play (“Pursue Play”) is probably hidden in all of us.

„Trend Space“ in hall 3.0
In the newly designed “Trend Space” in hall 3.0, Heimtextil will be demonstrating how the various scenarios can be lived out. Here, the trade fair presents five trend themes that represent a combination of inspiration, interaction and knowledge transfer and showcases trailblazing projects and design initiatives. The “Trend Space” also presents current colour trends. The immersive staging on site and the Trend Book, which is available as of now, document the poetic properties of colour as well as its inspiring, artistic and aesthetic power in design.

‘The new “Trend Space” at Heimtextil convinces with interactive and tactile worlds of experience. Visitors are playfully inspired, involved and motivated to get to grips with futuristic, spatial design concepts’, says Olaf Schmidt, Vice President Textiles & Textile Technologies at Messe Frankfurt, looking ahead to the future. ‘This creates a comprehensive picture of the design of future spaces and we can get some answers to the questions of how we will interact, consume, live and work in the future’, continues Schmidt.
 
An overview of Heimtextil trends 2019/2010:

PURSUE PLAY
In an era of uncertainty, political instability and environmental problems, we satisfy our need for optimism and creativity with play. Playing helps us to find meaning in the midst of chaos and turbulent times. Designers thus playfully focus on uninhibited, tactile interactions and experiments. Daring, cheeky product, room and fashion designs are loosened up with a touch of humour. Shapes and colour palettes take on a surrealistic note and the concept of L’art pour l’art once again commands attention. The use of rich primary colours is playful and naive, while the combination of high-gloss and matt textures creates a palatable visual appeal. Abstract forms, bold play with patterns and exuberant textures challenge us to be imaginative and invent our own stories.
 
SEEK SANCTUARY
In the midst of our intense, hyper-connected everyday life, more and more people are looking for ways to “cut off” all connections – for utopian havens of peace amidst all the noise. They retreat to urban oases where they can switch off to find relaxation, a new perspective and clarity. However, this essentialism does not mean that we have to categorically reject products. Rather, is it about the targeted search for and appreciation of design pieces and concepts that are simple, beautiful, functional and high quality. The combination of a minimalist colour palette with carefully selected structural details, curvy shapes and upholstery gives rise to comfort and warmth.

GO OFF-GRID
The search for a new closeness to nature leads to a hankering for experiences beyond a networked everyday life. It is an attempt to live more naturally, to return to the origins of humanity and to live in harmony with nature – and not against it. It is about cross-border experiences in remote locations, supported by high-tech survival equipment. The combination of hard-wearing technical aspects of outdoor textiles and workwear requires a sophisticated, utilitarian aesthetic and promises durability and functionality. Colours and patterns inspired by nature celebrate the supposed “imperfection” of the natural.
 
ESCAPE REALITY
A new utopia can be rooted in both the digital and the real. The potential of virtual and extended reality blurs the boundaries between fantasy and reality. We are working on a technology that enables deeper and more lasting experiences in daily life. Shimmering, iridescent surfaces have a transformative and optimistic quality, are transformed by movement and create a fleeting, intangible form of motion. Mother-of-pearl effects and high gloss create a unique dynamic in designs that seem to achieve the impossible by appearing fluid and in suspension as a solid form that could literally dissolve at any time. Ethereal combinations of light pastel shades create a surrealistic, hyper-real mood.

EMBRACE INDULGENCE
High-quality materials and rich colours, a modernist style and solid craftsmanship combine to form a utopian vision of the future of luxury. In a modern age marked by uncertainty, we look back through rose-tinted glasses to earlier epochs, remember the comfort of the good old days, long for security and surround ourselves with a calm, inviting aesthetic. Cleverly combined, honest materials, creatively implemented ideas and simple opulence form a new kind of comfort as well as give rise to intimacy and a sense of tangibleness.

 

More information:
Heimtextil Trends
Source:

Messe Frankfurt Exhibition GmbH

Industry Check in Asia Photo: Pixabay
19.06.2018

TEXTILE AND CLOTHING INDUSTRY IN ASIA: GTAI CHECKING THE SECTOR

Every day, GTAI experts observe and analyze the development of the most important German export industries on the world markets. Here you will find summarized information on the textile and clothing industry in Asian markets.
 
GTAI Industry Check - Vietnam
Textile and clothing industry: Vietnam needs more than sewing

Every day, GTAI experts observe and analyze the development of the most important German export industries on the world markets. Here you will find summarized information on the textile and clothing industry in Asian markets.
 
GTAI Industry Check - Vietnam
Textile and clothing industry: Vietnam needs more than sewing
The textile and clothing industry is one of the most important pillars of the Vietnamese industry and accounted for around 6 percent of total exports in 2017 with exports amounting to USD 26 billion. For 2018, the industry is aiming for growth of 7 to 8 percent and exports are expected to rise to over USD 33 billion. In order to comply with the rules of origin of the free trade agreements concluded by Vietnam, the country must achieve a higher added value. Domestic companies such as the Vinatex Group or Garco10, but also foreign companies are increasingly investing in technical innovations and expanding processes such as spinning, weaving and dyeing upstream of pure sewing. In addition, the first companies are beginning to automate their production processes.

GTAI Industry Check - Uzbekistan
Textile and clothing industry: Investments of more than USD 2 billion planned
The industry program for 2017 to 2020 lists around 130 projects with a total value of USD 2 billion. About half of the planned investments are to be
accounted for foreign commitments. The aim is to double the annual output of finished textile products during this period. With an annual production of more than 3 million tons of raw cotton, Uzbekistan is one of the world's largest producers of the white gold. A second industry programme foresees the implementation of five projects for the production of raw silk, silk wadding and silk fabrics and finished silk products between 2018 and 2021. The minimum investments required are estimated at USD 26 million.
 
GTAI Industry Check – Myanmar
Textile and clothing industry: Export strength through low wages
The lifting of sanctions by the EU and the US has noticeably revived the investment climate in the sector, especially as this was linked to the reactivation of the EU's GSP import status (Generalized System of Preferences). Most investors came from China, Hong Kong, Taiwan or South Korea, and Western brands such as GAP, H & M, Primark or Marks & Spencer were also included. Currently, about 400,000 workers are employed in almost 400 factories, mostly geared to CMP (cut-make-pack), including 171 foreign investors and 22 joint ventures. According to the Myanmar Garment Entrepreneurs Association, exports are expected to have increased by 40 percent to over USD 3 billion by 2017. For the first time the largest customer was the European Union, primarily Germany, ahead of Japan and South Korea.

GTAI Industry Check – Georgian Republic
Textile and clothing industry: Several expansion projects planned
The apparel industry produces garments for up to USD 70 million annually. The main products manufactured are international brands for export. Several new projects in the industry are in preparation. For example, the Turkish jeans manufacturer Baykanlar Textil plans to build a factory for the production of brand jeans in Ozurgeti by the end of 2018. A total of USD 15 million will be invested in the project. The Romanian company MGMtex, a subsidiary of the Swiss company Ottorose, is planning to start production of branded clothing in Kutaisi in cooperation with a local partner. The investments for the first and second project phases amount to more than USD 1.5 million. For the procurement of equipment, the company benefits from subsidies from the state program Produce in Georgia.

GTAI Industry Check - Turkmenistan
Textile and Clothing Industry: Investments of around 300 million US dollars planned
The textile and clothing industry represents 20 percent of Turkmenistan's industrial production and 30 percent of its manufacturing industry. A good USD 300 million will be invested in 2018 to 2020/21. The project list includes the construction of a large textile complex for the annual processing of up to 5,000 tons of fine-fibred cotton into semi-finished and finished products. Start March 2021; contractor: Cotam Enterprises Ltd, British Virgin Islands/Turkey) and a factory for the annual production of 6,000 tons of cotton yarn (2019/20, Hilli yol), the modernization of a textile factory (Daschogus), a cotton spinning mill (Tachtabasar) and a factory for medical wadding and cosmetic cotton (Ashgabat; 2018/2019 each). The potential of medical textiles, cotton fabrics, man-made fibers and the processing of wool and cocoons is still little used.
 
GTAI Industry Check – Azerbaijan
Textile and clothing industry: Light industry business park attracts investors
Azerbaijan launched several projects to revive the industry (output in 2017: USD 100 million). An industrial park for light industry has been under construction in Mingachevir since autumn 2016. Nine new factories are planned for cotton, acrylic and woolen yarn, clothing, hosiery and leather shoes. The project is worth up to USD 150 million. The first factory for the annual production of 20,000 tons of yarn is under construction. Under the umbrella organization for the Azerkhalcha carpet weaving mill founded in 2016, ten further smaller factories will be put into operation in 2018. Gilan Textil Park, Sumqayit, wants to expand its exports of home textiles. In the medium term, the construction of a silk spinning mill with an annual capacity of 3,000 tons of yarn is also planned.
 
GTAI Industry Check - Armenia
Textile and clothing industry: interest from abroad increases
Rising exports of clothing to Russia and western markets lead to expect further investments in the textile and clothing industry in 2018. Italian investors are planning to build a large jersey factory in Kapan (Sjunik region). The company SASSTEX in Artik (Schirak region) invests in two factories for the production of fashion (ZARA brand) and workwear. The Egyptian Wassef Group is considering the production of cotton fabrics and products therefrom. Yerevan-based hosiery and children's apparel manufacturer Alex Textile will continue its USD 28 million investment program in 2018 to expand apparel and hosiery production at several sites in Armenia.

More information:
Asia Export
Source:

Germany Trade & Invest www.gtai.de

05.12.2017

TURKISH CLOTHING MANUFACTURERS RELY ON DESIGN AND OWN BRANDS

  • Companies want stay away from cheap contract manufacturing

Istanbul (GTAI) - The highly export-oriented Turkish textile and clothing industry wants to increase its competitiveness on world markets by investing in design. The hitherto widespread contract manufacturing for foreign brand manufacturers is losing importance in favor of own collections. With a law from 2016, the Turkish state explicitly promotes investment in design.

  • Companies want stay away from cheap contract manufacturing

Istanbul (GTAI) - The highly export-oriented Turkish textile and clothing industry wants to increase its competitiveness on world markets by investing in design. The hitherto widespread contract manufacturing for foreign brand manufacturers is losing importance in favor of own collections. With a law from 2016, the Turkish state explicitly promotes investment in design.

The Turkish textile and clothing industry is going through a structural change: While the garment industry was once particularly interesting because of the comparatively low labor costs for contract manufacturing orders from Western companies, Turkish manufacturers are increasingly working as designers for international clients. In addition to well-known Turkish fashion manufacturers such as Ipekyol, Vakko and Zorluteks, more and more Turkish textile companies are also manufacturing and marketing their own brands. In parallel, they are expanding their online sales network. For example, Ipekyol intends to close half of its stores in the next 20 years.

In order to meet the changing demand of foreign cooperation partners, Turkish clothing companies are increasingly investing in research and development projects, as the Turkish business magazine Ekonomist reports.

For example, Hassan Tekstil (http://www.hassan.com.tr) based in Istanbul, founded in 2017, has a 45-member R & D department. The company, whose revenues of USD 232 mio in 2016 were generated 35 percent from exports, plans to spend1.5 percent of its revenue on R & D activities.    

Another company that is increasingly investing in R & D and design is TYH Tekstil (http://www.tyh.com.tr) in Istanbul. This purely export-oriented company with a turnover of around USD 100 mio (2016) employs 15 fashion experts. About 1.5 to 2 percent of sales, which will reach around USD 130 mio in 2017, will be used for design projects and the development of collections, according to the Economist's report. In addition to contract manufacturing for well-known international brands such as Gant and COS, TYH Tekstil also developed its own brand Roqa for women's outerwear. Meanwhile, 20 to 25 percent of exports are from the supply of private label products.

Innovative workwear for security forces

According to Economist, another manufacturer with increasing R & D activities is Narkonteks (http://www.narkonteks.com) in Izmir. This company, which does not produces for international companies only, produces also goods under its own brand "Blackspade". Narkonteks also supplies customers in the Netherlands with technical textiles for security personnel. The manufacturer employs 30 engineers for its R & D activities. Of the targeted sales of TL 100 mio in 2017, 1.5 percent will be spent on R & D activities.

In 2016 Narkonteks generated around TL 80 mio. (1 Euro = 4.50 TL). The company Farb Textile (http://www.farbetextile.com) in Izmir, which sews for European fashion companies such as Bestseller, Inditex and Mango, emphasizes increased design activities also, according to Economist. About 60 percent of the production are own brands. The turnover of TL 100 mio (2016), should be increased to TL 130 mio.
 
One of the larger R & D investors is the clothing manufacturer Taypa Tekstil in Istanbul (http://www.taypa.com.tr) with a turnover of EUR 100 million, which exports about 80 percent of its production. The parent company TAy Group, which supplies large fashion houses such as Levis, Inditex and Tommy Hilfiger, uses 5 percent of its revenue for research and innovation projects and employs 25 designers, writes the magazine Ekonomist. The share of own brands in sales of currently 21 percent is to be increased to 50 percent in the foreseeable future.

Taypa invests in major project in Algeria

In addition to the existing production in Egypt Taypa Tekstil manufactures in Serbia and Algeria. In a clothing factory in Kraljevo, Serbia, EUR 35 mio should be invested over the next five years. A large-scale project called "TayalSPA" is being planned in Algeria for the construction of an integrated textile and clothing factory in the Sidi Khetab industrial zone in the province of Relizane. According to Taypa CEO Burak Karaarslan, quoted in the business paper "Dünya", this project, with an support of 50 percent by the Algerian government will receive investments totaling USD 2 billion in three phases until 2023.

USD 800 mio will be invested in the recently started initial construction phase. The company will start with yarn production first. Thereafter, from the end of 2018, the production of denim and other fabrics will commence. After completion of the first phase, the annual production will reach 30 million meters of denim and non-denim fabrics, 14 million meters of fabrics for shirts, 3,200 tons of knitwear and 30 million pieces of ready-made garments.    

Government encourages investment in research and development

The Turkish state has been promoting investments in design since 2016: By Law No. 6676 of February16th 2016 (Government Gazette "Resmi Gazete" No. 29636 of 26.02.16) amending Law No. 5746 of 28.02.08 on the promotion R & D activities, in contrast to the previous practice, investment in design projects were concluded in the government support. Thus, companies that employ at least 15 people (previously 30) in the R & D sector can benefit from tax and customs privileges. Imported products for research projects are exempt from import duties.

Comprehensive support measures in the form of project-based grants for the marketing of Turkish brands abroad also include Regulation No. 2016/1 of the Turkish Monetary Credit and Coordination Council, which was announced in the Official Gazette No. 29898 of November 24th 2016. The implementation of subsidies is the responsibility of the Ministry of Economy.

According to figures from the Ministry of Science, Industry and Technology, there are a total of 38 R & D and 29 design centers nationwide in the textile and clothing industry.

Germany is most important target market

Turkey is a major exporter of textiles and clothing. According to official statistics, the country exported USD 24.3 billion worth of textiles and clothing in 2016 (including USD 16.7 billion in ready-to-wear articles). The export association IHKIB is targeting USD 60 billion in ready-to-wear exports in 2023. In apparel, Germany is the most important customer with a share of 18.8 percent. For textiles and textile raw materials, the country is the fourth largest market for Turkish exporters with 5 percent.     

Turkish foreign trade in confectionery (in USD mio)
Year   Export Import
2014 18,484.6 3,062.4
2015 16,756.3 2,846.9
2016 16,739.3 2,690.7

Source: Export Association IHKIB; Turkish Ministry of Economy

Turkish foreign trade in textiles and textile raw materials (in USD mio.)
Year Export Import
2014 8,535.9 9,172.9
2015 7,590.8 8,270.4
2016 7,568.8 8,171.0

Source: IHKIB; Ministry of Economy

Turkish export of garments by country (in USD mio) 
  2015 2016 Share 2016 (%)
Total    16,756.3 16,739.3 100.0
Germany  3,156.4 3,139.9 18.8
United Kingdom 2,187.2 2,015.1    12.0
Spain 1,666.0  1,738.8    10.4
France 871.3   837.2   5.0
Netherlands 803.1 774.9 4.6
Italy 592.4 610.9 3.6
Irak 741.1 558.9 3.3
Polen 445.6 556.1 3.3
USA 493.2 533.6 3.2
Denmark 401.0 422.3 2.5

Source: IHKIB; Ministry of Economy

Turkish exports of textiles and textile raw materials by country (in USD mio)
  2015 2016 Share 2016 (%)
Total 7,590.8 7,568.8 100
Italy 748.9 729.5 9.6
Bulgaria 309.6 598.1 7.9
Iran 319.2 387.9 5.1
Germany 384.4 380.7 5.0
USA 346.1 313.1 4.1
United Kingdom 330.5 303.7 4.0
Spain 251.2 284.9 3.8
Romania 285.7 278.2 3.7
Polen 269.1 275.1 3.6
Egypt 246.7 225.0 3.0

Source: IHKIB; Ministry of Economy  

Messe Frankfurt intensifies its textile-related involvement in Africa © Pixabay
31.10.2017

MESSE FRANKFURT INTENSIFIES ITS TEXTILE-RELATED INVOLVEMENT IN AFRICA

  • Morocco, Ethiopia and South Africa: Network comprises the most important textile regions in Africa
  • Emerging continent: positive forecasts in the textile sector

First Ethiopia, then South Africa and shortly Morocco: Messe Frankfurt is expanding its portfolio of textile trade fairs on the African continent. With its forthcoming cooperation with the two trade fairs Maroc in Mode and Maroc Sourcing, the global market leader for textile trade fairs is expanding its presence in North West Africa. ‘In future, our network will extend across important textile regions in Africa and encompass the leading trade fairs on the emerging continent’, explains Olaf Schmidt, Vice President Textiles & Textile Technologies at Messe Frankfurt. ‘With our commitment to Ethiopia, South Africa and, in future, Morocco, we have created excellent conditions to support the positive developments in Africa's textile industry’.

  • Morocco, Ethiopia and South Africa: Network comprises the most important textile regions in Africa
  • Emerging continent: positive forecasts in the textile sector

First Ethiopia, then South Africa and shortly Morocco: Messe Frankfurt is expanding its portfolio of textile trade fairs on the African continent. With its forthcoming cooperation with the two trade fairs Maroc in Mode and Maroc Sourcing, the global market leader for textile trade fairs is expanding its presence in North West Africa. ‘In future, our network will extend across important textile regions in Africa and encompass the leading trade fairs on the emerging continent’, explains Olaf Schmidt, Vice President Textiles & Textile Technologies at Messe Frankfurt. ‘With our commitment to Ethiopia, South Africa and, in future, Morocco, we have created excellent conditions to support the positive developments in Africa's textile industry’. Demographic change, increasing urbanisation and shifts in economic forces - these global developments are promoting the growth of the African economy and having a significant impact on the textile industry.

According to the UN Economic Report on Africa 2017, Africa has the fastest growing population. The current population of around 1.2 billion people will more than double by 2050. The number of working people on the African continent is also increasing rapidly. The largest working population (1.1 billion) in the world is predicted to be in Africa by 2034. These demographic changes are causing personal and business consumption to increase sharply, and this will primarily benefit regional economic markets. 

Morocco: Maroc in Mode & Maroc Sourcing

Morocco in particular offers great potential for the clothing trade: Morocco's proximity to important fashion markets such as the EU and the USA, various free trade agreements and a recent economic growth rate of four per cent (between 2010 and 2015, Nachrichten für den Außenhandel, NfA, 19 January 2017) create a secure business climate. The Maroc in Fashion and Maroc Sourcing trade fairs, which have been in existence since 2014, currently showcase around 120 exhibitors from Morocco, Tunisia, Egypt, Turkey, China and a number of Western European countries. The extensive product portfolio inspires with its strong expertise in fashion. The trade fairs are regarded as a hotspot for fast fashion and not only present fashion, denim, lingerie and knitwear, but also sports and casualwear, workwear and accessories. Messe Frankfurt will agree on a cooperation with AMITH (Association Marocaine des Industries du Textile et de l’Habillement), the organiser of the event, for the next edition. The trade fair will take place on 26-27 October 2017 at the Exhibition Park Hassan Circuit in Marrakesh. 

South Africa: Source Africa & ATF Expo

South Africa is the continent's strongest economic power and one of the largest consumer markets. The country has the most powerful retail sector and is the best networked of all African countries. This international networking and its regional free trade agreements make South Africa an important hub for trade with other African countries as well as neighbouring Pacific countries such as the Arabian Peninsula and India.

With the recently approved takeover of the Source Africa and ATF fairs, Messe Frankfurt is driving the exchange between international and regional buyers, manufacturers and suppliers in this region. Source Africa was founded in 2014 as a trade fair for African producers of fabrics, accessories, clothing, shoes and leather items. It appeals not only to African trade buyers but also to international manufacturers of clothing and fashion. The fifth edition of the fair will take place on 20-21 June 2018 at the International Convention Center (CTICC) in Cape Town. ATF Expo will open its doors at the same venue from  21 to 23 November 2017. Ever since 1998, this trade fair has offered an internationally-oriented product range of fabrics, clothing, shoes, leather goods and accessories as well as services for a predominantly local and regional purchasing community.

Ethiopia: successful start for Texworld, Apparel Sourcing and Texprocess

In eastern Africa, Ethiopia has developed into an attractive contract manufacturing country for clothing and leather goods thanks to the government's strategy of focusing on light industry. Ethiopia also benefits from free trade agreements such as AGOA that are aimed at promoting the African economy. With the Africa Sourcing and Fashion Week (ASFW), Messe Frankfurt has had a strong partner at its side ever since the latest edition in October 2017. Offshoots of the three trade fair brands Texworld, Apparel Sourcing and Texprocess were integrated into the Africa Sourcing & Fashion Week for the first time. It is a sourcing platform for mainly European and US fashion companies. The seventh edition brought together around 200 international exhibitors from 25 countries in Addis Ababa's Millennium Hall. Clothing fabrics, contract manufacturing, fashion and accessories were exhibited as well as machinery for contract manufacturing, CAD/CAM systems, printers, printing inks and accessories. In addition, the trade fair also impressed visitors with a fashion show, a series of lectures, a trend section and a matchmaking platform.

Messe Frankfurt: A strong presence in global textile markets

With a portfolio of over 50 international textile trade fairs, Messe Frankfurt is the global market leader in trade fairs for the textile industry. In 2016, around 19,500 exhibitors and approx. 477,000 visitors came to the events in Europe, North America and Asia. With the name Texpertise Network, the textile event offer of Messe Frankfurt covers the entire value creation chain – from apparel fabrics and fashion to home and contract textiles, technical textiles and the processing and care of textiles. The trade fairs include the successful brands Texworld, Apparel Sourcing, Ethical Fashion Show, Greenshowroom, Intertextile, Yarn Expo, Leatherworld, Emitex, Avantex, Avanprint, Heimtextil, Intertextile Home Textiles, Interior Lifestyle, Home Textiles Sourcing, Techtextil, Texprocess, Simatex, Confemaq and Texcare.

Maroc in Mode & Maroc Sourcing: www.marocsourcing.ma
Source Africa & AFT: www.sourceafrica.co.za / www.atfexpo.co.za
Africa Sourcing & Fashion Week: www.asfw-online.com

A+A 2017 (c) Messe Duesseldorf
24.10.2017

A+A 2017 sets New Standards for Health and Safety at Work

People matter – now more than ever. This is underscored by the huge interest taken by exhibitors in the run-up to A+A 2017, once again allowing the world’s leading trade fair for safety, security and health at work held from 17 to 20 October to post top marks. A total of 1,930 exhibitors from 63 nations and over 67,000 trade visitors came to the world’s largest trade fair for this industry in Düsseldorf. This means that this year A+A – together with the International Congress for Occupational Safety and Occupational Medicine – very much underlined the huge importance of health and safety at the workplace.

People matter – now more than ever. This is underscored by the huge interest taken by exhibitors in the run-up to A+A 2017, once again allowing the world’s leading trade fair for safety, security and health at work held from 17 to 20 October to post top marks. A total of 1,930 exhibitors from 63 nations and over 67,000 trade visitors came to the world’s largest trade fair for this industry in Düsseldorf. This means that this year A+A – together with the International Congress for Occupational Safety and Occupational Medicine – very much underlined the huge importance of health and safety at the workplace.

Investing in the health of employees pays off. It helps to ensure the performance of the workforce and increase productivity. It is all the more important to foster a holistic approach to prevention that takes all aspects of occupational health management, safety and workplace design into consideration. “Here the A+A, as the world’s leading trade fair for safety and healthy, joins forces with its partners,” sums up Messe Düsseldorf Managing Director Joachim Schäfer. “Digitalisation is no longer just something for the future and has now penetrated virtually all areas of life and work – likewise the Internet of Things that now networks billions of things together worldwide. It is fabulous that A+A is not just a stage for new technologies but is now also being seen globally as a bridgehead between the past and the future of our world of work.”

Bigger and More International than Ever: Top Marks across all Disciplines
Organisers and exhibitors alike were satisfied with how A+A 2017 went. The 31st edition of A+A held from 17 to 20 October attracted more than 67,000 trade visitors (2015: 65,000) to Düsseldorf who gathered information from the 1,931 exhibitors from 63 nations on the latest trends in the fields of occupational safety, promotion of health at work and security management in nine trade fair halls occupying for the first time 70,733 m2. At 40% the proportion of international visitors who came from over 100 nations also exceeded the share recorded at the previous event. “A+A is continually growing and underlines at all levels its relevance for the sector as the world’s leading trade fair and congress event,” says Messe Düsseldorf Managing Director Joachim Schäfer delighting at the excellent mood over the past four days and summing up talks with exhibitors and international delegations as follows: “We are proud to have been able to send out across the entire world strong signals to the markets and key impulses for political debate.” Against this backdrop the new look of A+A and the focus on what matters not just in the world of work have proven their worth: people.

Platform for Innovations and Investment
"People matter – what an apt statement,” sums up Klaus Bornack, President of the Trade Fair Advisory Board and Managing Director of Bornack GmbH & Co. KG. “A great A+A once again moved the sector with many innovative products, even more exhibitors from all specialist fields and, in turn, a rising number of very interested trade visitors from home and abroad with specific technical queries and a great deal of interest. This is confirmation that PPE is a growth market and that A+A is a leading international marketplace for safety at work.”

No. 1 International Event for Workwear  
The good investment climate as well as the interest from trade visitors in high-quality personal protective equipment and protective workwear was confirmed by a current study conducted on the German market for personal protective equipment that was published during A+A 2017 by market research firm macrom. This study showed that the volume of the entire German PPE market grew between 2014 and 2016 by 9.2% to a total of Euro 1.97b. Leading here with the largest market share is protective workwear that is increasingly also being worn in the private sphere. Commenting on this Birgit Horn, Director A+A 2017, said: “While protective workwear in the past was generally uncomfortable and not particularly fashionable, staff today are fairly willing to show themselves in public wearing this clothing. Thanks to the development of high-tech  clothing in the sports and outdoor sectors people no longer have to deprive themselves of top design and optimum performance. This was also confirmed by the over 200 Corporate Fashion exhibitors and rounded off by newly designed fashion shows.

The Future of Work is Now  
From smart skin sensors and the measuring of vital parameters to backfriendly exoskeletons and smart fleet management, data glasses and sensor-controlled fall protection: the future of work is now. This was made clear not just by the new A+A Highlight Route. Across the halls renowned exhibitors like 3M, BORNACK, Honeywell, Uvex or the Institute for Occupational Safety and Health of the German Social Accident Insurance (Institut für Arbeitsschutz der Deutschen Gesetzlichen Unfallversicherung – IFA) presented highlights focussing on “Smart PPE”, “Digitalisation of Work” and “Digital Applications and Solutions” – from the prototype to the mass-produced product. Also addressed were such aspects as the urgently required reorganisation of work processes for the ageing population or the new demands on the world of work from the younger generation.”
 
At the Highest Specialist Level: The A+A Congress
Also enjoying great acclaim was the International Congress for Occupational Safety and Occupational Medicine that is traditionally organised by the Federal Association for Occupational Safety and Health (Bundesarbeitsgemeinschaft für Sicherheit und Gesundheit bei der Arbeit e.V. – Basi). “We had a very exciting A+A congress,” was the verdict of Basi Managing Director Bruno Zwingmann. “For the first time we were able to welcome to the congress new groups of people interested in occupational safety – for instance, representatives of the severely handicapped who also discussed the founding of an umbrella association at the congress.” Over the four days of the trade fair a total of some 5,000 congress delegates streamed into CCD Congress Center Düsseldorf Süd to gather information on the varied range of topics on offers. The 60 focal series dealt with such topics as production operations in the location of Germany with ageing workforces, positive aspects of digitalisation and mental stress with a focus on small businesses and their working conditions. The top events included one focusing on the “Fighting Cancer at the Workplace”. The A+A Congress was accompanied by the conference of the International Labour Organisation (ILO) and the International Social Security Association (ISSA) attended by top ranking figures.

A Burning Issue: Fire Prevention
As the most important sectoral platform worldwide for personal protective equipment and protective workwear A+A once again this year showcased everything revolving around modern firefighters protective clothing as well as the entire spectrum of personal protective equipment for firefighters: be this head, eye, body, hand, foot, ear, breathing or rope protection. Also on display were the preventative measures and concepts that can help to prevent accidents, major disasters and rescue missions and how firefighters are trained in realistic conditions in real fires.
The next A+A will be held from 5 to 8 November 2019.

 

RUSSIAN GOVERNMENT SETS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM UNTIL 2025 FOR THE TEXTILE INDUSTRY © Jerzy Sawluk / pixelio.de
28.06.2016

RUSSIAN GOVERNMENT SETS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM UNTIL 2025 FOR THE TEXTILE INDUSTRY

  • Anticrisis Plan provides grants of nearly Ruble 1.5 Billion 

Moscow (GTAI) – In spring 2016 the Russian government has decided a "Strategy for the development of the light industry until 2025" and a "Federal program to support enterprises of the light industry" (anticrisis plan). Hence the Russian textile enterprises should be supported in the crisis. It is the aim of the Ministry of Industry and Trade to double the share of domestic producers on the clothing market from currently 25% to 50% in the year 2025.

  • Anticrisis Plan provides grants of nearly Ruble 1.5 Billion 

Moscow (GTAI) – In spring 2016 the Russian government has decided a "Strategy for the development of the light industry until 2025" and a "Federal program to support enterprises of the light industry" (anticrisis plan). Hence the Russian textile enterprises should be supported in the crisis. It is the aim of the Ministry of Industry and Trade to double the share of domestic producers on the clothing market from currently 25% to 50% in the year 2025.

According to the Ministry of Industry and Trade 14,000 companies (including 200 large enterprises) of the Russian light industry are producing clothing, textiles, footwear and leather goods. They generate annually a turnover of Ruble 270 billion. Of that 653 large and medium and 4,000 small businesses are operating in the yarn and textile industry. Because the purchasing power and consumer demand fell, the light industry slowed its production in 2015 by 12%.

To give the clothing and textile factories more security, the Russian government adopted in spring 2016 a "Strategy for the development of the light industry until 2025" and a "Federal program to support enterprises of the light industry" (anticrisis plan). It is the aim of the Ministry of Industry and Trade to double the share of domestic producers on the clothing market from currently 25% to 50% in the year 2025.  In this context up to 330,000 additional jobs should be achieved.

Anticrisis plan provides subsidies of Ruble 1.475 billion
In the anticrisis plan Ruble 1.475 billion will be granted. This should especially support manufacturers of school uniforms, children's apparel and textile factories that work on government orders. The financial support includes: subsidies for producers of school uniforms for the lower classes made out of Russian worsted fabrics (Ruble 600 million), subsidies for working capital loans to support purchases of raw materials (Ruble 800 million), subsidies for investment loans for technical modernization of enterprises (Ruble 75 million).

As part of the development program for the light industry an own development bank for the textile and clothing industry will be set up – following the example of the Rosselkhozbank. The hitherto in agriculture specialized state leasing company Rosagroleasing should accompany the technical modernization of the textile and clothing companies. In addition, the government ordinance no. 791 prohibits, as in  
the version of February, 17th 2016 on all three government levels (federal, regional, municipal), government procurement of imported textiles and garments when there are offers from domestic Producers.

Industrial parks and clusters for the light industry are growing
In addition, two industrial parks for the clothing and textile industry will be set up in the areas of Ivanovo and St. Petersburg. In addition, a regional cluster of the light industry in the Chelyabinsk region of the South Ural is growing. The fund for the development of the Russian industry promotes investments with low interest rates on credits, for example the project of Praimteks (Primetex) in the Ivanovo region for the production of textiles using digital textile printing (credit: Rubles 466 million rubles).

Further, the domestic producers of clothing and footwear should gain access in future to the funding instruments of the federal association for the development of small and medium-sized enterprises. Critics complain, that the subsidies reach mostly large companies only and above all companies working with government contracts.

Capacity building for chemical fibers 
Export opportunities are seen by the Ministry of Industry in synthetic fibers. In the textile cluster Ivanovo (http://invest-ivanovo.ru/data/prog.pdf) a chemical fiber plant is growing with public aid, scheduled to begin production from 2018. With that 250,000 t chemical fibers would additionally annually be available. Until now both manufac-turers Komitex and Wladimirski Polyefir produce together 33,000 t chemical fibers per anno. Viscose is currently not being produced at all in Russia. The import share of polyester is 74%, of polyamide 88%. 

In future the synthetic fibers may be supplied to BTK Textile and other customers. The production complex of BTK Textile in the textile City Shakhty in the Rostov region, was inaugurated in June 2015. The company manufactures high-tech textiles and knitwear made out of synthetic fibers of which work-wear, sport-wear and ski-wear are being sewn. BTK Textile has fabric production capacities of about 12 million square meters per year, General Director Sergey Bazoev says. Up to now BTK Textile has to buy the synthetic fibers and yarns predominantly in Asia. That could change soon. The BTK Group is the largest Russian manufacturer of men's clothing and uniforms.

Building new production facilities in Russia is not so easy: equipment of domestic manufacturing is not available and imported technology became very expensive due to the Ruble devaluation. So the technical facilities of BKT for manufacturing, impregnation or coating of fabrics and for apparel sewing (in total 250 units) are coming from Italy, Denmark, Germany, Switzerland and France. Long-term loans of over 8 to 12 years are not available and if - only at high interest rates. The lack of a variety of technologies and materials (establishing of extensive fabric and accessories inventories is too expensive) remains the main problem for Russian textile companies. Therefore, the number of new projects in the light industry is not yet clear.
Russian Federation - production of textiles and clothing (change in %)
Description 2015 Change 2015/2014
Cotton fiber (mio. bales) 111.0 4.4
Chemical fibers (mio. bales) 66.0 -4.5
Fabrics (mio. sqm) 4,542 14.7
.thereof from: :    
.Silk (1,000 sqm) 253,0 31.8
.Wool (1,000 sqm) 9.262,0 -20.9
.Linen 25,9 -26,6
.Cotton 1.176,0 -4,5
.Chemical fibers 237,0 14,2
Fabrics made out of other materials 3.084,0 25,1
Fabrics with plastic impregnation (mio. sqm) 32,3 14,6
Bed-linen (mio. pieces) 59,8 -9,6
Carpets (mio. sqm) 22,6 -3,7
Knitwear (1,000 t) 14,2 29,8
Stockings (mio. pair) 199 -5,6
Coats (1,000 pieces) 989 -22,1
Lined jackets (1,000 pieces) 1.887 -45,4
Suits (1,000 pieces) 4.690 -12,6
Men’s jackets and blazer (1,000 pieces) 870 14,1
Women’s coats with fur collar (pieces) 5.543 -46,1
Clothing made out of artificial fur (1,000 pieces) 24,5 21,0
Uniforms and workwear (mio. pieces) 20,7 -8,2
Work- and protective clothing (mio. pieces) 99,8 14,6
Overalls (1,000 pieces) 733 -62,4

Source: Rosstat 2016

Russian Federation - production of textiles and clothing (change in %)
Description 1st Quarter 2016 Change
1st Quarter 2016 / 1st Quarter 2015
Sewing thread made out of synthetic fibers (mio. reels)   14,0 -0,6
Fabrics (mio sqm) 1,2 23,3
Bed linen (mio pieces) 14,7 -7,7
Knitted stockings (mio. pairs) 55,4 34,0
Knitwear (mio. pieces) 24,8 -6,0
Workwear, uniforms (mio. pieces) 31,1 11,2
Coats (1,000 pieces) 269 9,1

Source: Rosstat 2016


Contact addresses:
Ministry of Industry and Trade

Department of Light Industry
Denis Klimentewitsch Pak, Director of the Department
109074 Moskau, Kitajgorodskij proesd 7
Tel.: 007 495/632 8004 (Sekretariat), Fax: -632 88 65
E-Mail: dgrvt@minprom.gov.ru, Internet: http://minpromtorg.gov.ru

(Sub) department of Light Industry: Director: Irina Alekseewna Iwanowa,
Tel.: -632 87 31, -346 04 73; E-Mail: ivanovaia@minprom.gov.ru
Internet: http://minpromtorg.gov.ru/ministry/dep/#!9&click_tab_vp_ind=1
"Strategy for the development of Light Industry until 2025."
http://www.kptf.ru/images/company/Presentation.pdf (Presentation of the strategy)
http://minpromtorg.gov.ru/docs/#!strategiya_razvitiya_legkoy_promyshlennosti_rossii_na_period_do_2025_goda (Text of the strategy and action plan)

Russian Union of Entrepreneurs of Textile and Light Industry
107023 Moskau, uliza Malaja Semenowskaja 3
Tel.: 007 495/280 15 48, Fax: -280 10 85
E-Mail: info@souzlegprom.ru, Internet: http://www.souzlegprom.ru

 

TEXCARE INTERNATIONAL 2016 © Foto: Jens Liebchen / Messe Frankfurt GmbH
21.06.2016

TEXCARE INTERNATIONAL CLOSES WITH A NEW INTERNATIONALITY RECORD

  • Trade visitors very pleased with the bigger and more extensive range of products at the world’s leading trade fair for the sector
  • Exhibitors and visitors rate the economic situation in the sector as very good
Texcare International has closed its doors after welcoming ten percent more international visitors. Overall, the number of trade visitors remained stable – of the 15,700 visitors (2012: 15,650 from 101 countries*), almost 9,000 (2012: 8,045) came from outside Germany to the world’s leading trade fair for the sector in Frankfurt am Main from 11 to 15 June 2016, which means that international visitors account for 57 percent of the total. The visitors travelled to Texcare International from 112 countries, to discover the latest products and innovations at the exhibition stands.
  • Trade visitors very pleased with the bigger and more extensive range of products at the world’s leading trade fair for the sector
  • Exhibitors and visitors rate the economic situation in the sector as very good
Texcare International has closed its doors after welcoming ten percent more international visitors. Overall, the number of trade visitors remained stable – of the 15,700 visitors (2012: 15,650 from 101 countries*), almost 9,000 (2012: 8,045) came from outside Germany to the world’s leading trade fair for the sector in Frankfurt am Main from 11 to 15 June 2016, which means that international visitors account for 57 percent of the total. The visitors travelled to Texcare International from 112 countries, to discover the latest products and innovations at the exhibition stands. After Germany, the top visitor nations included Italy, France, the Netherlands, Belgium, Spain, the United Kingdom, Switzerland, Denmark, Austria and Poland. Outside Europe, the USA, Japan, Australia, the United Arab Emirates, China and India ranked among the biggest visitor nations at the textile-care fair. Overall, the proportion of international visitors from outside Europe rose from 15 to 22 percent with the largest non-European growth coming from Argentina and Kazakhstan. In Germany, the market continues to be characterised by an on-going process of consolidation and concentration.
 
For five days, 319 exhibitors from 28 countries (2012: 262 exhibitors from 26 countries) – over 20 percent more than four years ago – presented their high-tech solutions and innovations for laundries, dry cleaners and textile service providers. The proportion of international exhibitors also reached a new record at 68 percent. On 30 percent more exhibition space and in two halls for the first time, the manufacturers presented a more extensive range of products and services, especially in the textiles and IT product groups. The focal point of the exhibitors’ presentations was on networking all processes in accordance with Industry 4.0. Impulses for the sustainable conversion to ‘smart laundries’ were generated by innovations for contactless laundry registration, for visualising all processes in real-time, for intelligent storage systems and for the use of robot technology.
 
Wolfgang Marzin, President and Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Messe Frankfurt, says, “The atmosphere at Texcare International 2016 was outstanding and international growth reinforced the position of the event as the world’s leading trade fair for the sector. Top decision-makers from all over the world travelled to Frankfurt am Main to do business at the fair and gain new customers.” The level of visitor decision-making authority also rose again: over 60 percent of visitors said they were authorised to make purchases on behalf of their companies.
 
84 percent of exhibitors confirmed that they had achieved their goals for the fair, especially in terms of sales agreements signed, order books filled and numerous new international contacts made. Elgar Straub, Director General of VDMA Garment and Leather Technology, says, “Texcare International exceeded the expectations of its exhibitors by a wide margin. The high level of visitor internationality shows the great worldwide interest and demand for new, future-oriented technologies, as reflected by subjects such as Industry 4.0 and the on-going process of digitalisation on which the fair focused.”
 
89 percent of exhibitors said that the economic situation in the sector is very good, an increase of three percent over the last Texcare International four years ago. 89 percent of visitors also agreed with this assessment.

98 percent of visitors said they were very pleased with the range of products and services at Texcare International. Andreas Schumacher, Managing Director of the German Dry Cleaning Association (– DTV Deutscher Textilreinigungsverband), says, “We are delighted with the course of business at 
the fair. The echo from exhibitors and visitors has been excellent. Very popular was the opportunity to exchange information and opinions about subjects of topical importance to the sector at Texcare Forum in addition to visiting the exhibition stands. The DTV stand itself was also a welcome meeting place for holding discussions with our members and sponsors. We were particularly pleased with the highly positive response of visitors to our programme of events, which included a fashion show and ironing competition.”
 
At the fair, trade visitors from all over the world were able to discern the latest trends in the sector and gain an excellent impression of the high-grade products offered by the manufacturers. The events held within the framework of Texcare International also proved to be very popular, especially the lectures at the Texcare Forum, which were attended by over 1,000 participants. The division into themed days – education and careers, innovative textiles, sustainability and Industry 4.0 – was also very well received.

A highlight at Texcare International was the fashion show where manufacturers presented their collections and showed the latest trends in terms of colour, design and function for industrial, healthcare and catering workwear. The first ironing competition to be held at Texcare gave participants the chance to match themselves against others and to demonstrate their skills.
 
The next Texcare International will be held in Frankfurt am Main from 20 to 24 June 2020; the next Texcare Asia in the autumn of 2017.
 
You will find further information about Texcare International at www.texcare.com.
Follow Texcare on our social-media channels at:
www.texcare.com/twitter
www.texcare.com/facebook
 
BEKLEIDUNGSHERSTELLER VERLAGERN PRODUKTION NACH RUSSLAND © Florentine/ pixelio.de
17.05.2016

CLOTHING MANUFACTURERS MOVING PRODUCTION TO RUSSIA

  • Weak Ruble makes domestic Production profitable
  • Government encourages Investments

Moscow (GTAI) - Sales of textiles and clothing will continue to decline. Production in Russia however will rise. Due to the strong Ruble devaluation in the last two years, the conditions for the textile and clothing industry have completely changed. On the one hand falling real incomes lead to declining demand. On the other hand labor costs have fallen under Asian benchmarks.

  • Weak Ruble makes domestic Production profitable
  • Government encourages Investments

Moscow (GTAI) - Sales of textiles and clothing will continue to decline. Production in Russia however will rise. Due to the strong Ruble devaluation in the last two years, the conditions for the textile and clothing industry have completely changed. On the one hand falling real incomes lead to declining demand. On the other hand labor costs have fallen under Asian benchmarks.

Due to the low Ruble exchange rate it has become cheaper in 2015 for domestic and foreign textile and clothing companies to produce in Russia. Translated into US dollars, labor costs are currently due to the Ruble devaluation 10 to 15% below the reference value in the PRC. The average wage of a worker in the garment industry in China is currently USD 300 to 350, in Russian Rubles 12,000 to 15,000 (USD 185-230).
 
Relocation to Russia begins
According to a report of the newspaper "Izvestia" the first domestic and foreign clothing manufacturers of branded products have reacted and shift their production capacity from Asia to Russia or have subcontract Russian garment manufacturers.  These include companies like Roztech (brands: Dikaja Orchideja, Bjustje, Defile, Grand Defile), Sportmaster, Melon Fashion Group (befree, Zarina, Love Republic), Finn Flare and Kira Plastinina.

"A few years ago we produced 20 to 30% of our collection in Russia, last year 2015 there were already 30 to 40% and now already about 70%", the commercial director of "Kira Plastinina Style" Vladimir Romanov reported. For that the company has established its own production in an industrial park in Osery close to Moscow.

Other brand manufacturers and retailers like Zara (Inditex), Sela, Baon, Gloria Jeans, Modis, Lamoda, Lady & Gentleman, kangaroo and Sneschnaja Korolewa are looking for opportunities to relocate their production to Russia. The Ministry of Industry and Trade is in intensive discussions with Zara, H & M, Benetton, Dekatlon, Sportmaster and IKEA (home textiles) in order to convince them of the advantages of production in Russia. In future IKEA wants to get up to 40% of its products produced by Russian firms.

Roztech plans to double its production of women's underwear to up to 8 million units. Currently two sites are rented for that in the Smolensk region. For repairs and preparations for production in the rented plants Roztech will invest about  Rubles 60 million. Two other sewing factories in the area of Moscow and Smolensk are already working for Roztech. Contract productions in the PRC and in the Baltic States the company will be terminated because of this.

The franchise chain Finn Flare (Finland) has rented a factory with 500 square meters close to Moscow early 2016, renovated it and installed new equipment. For that Rubles 12 million were invested, General Director Ksenija Rjasowa said. The sewing factory is scheduled to start in May and will produce 40,000 to 60,000 pieces clothing per year. Beginning of 2016 Finn Flare possessed 143 Russian stores (54 franchised).
 
Manufacturers of sportswear increase their share of production in Russia
Since the outbreak of the Ruble crisis Sportmaster has begun to place a portion of its contracts with Russian companies. Currently 15% of the clothing and footwear is coming from Russian production. The retail chain operates shops with the brands Sportmaster - 460, Ostin - 760 and Funday - 60.

The MMD group "Vostok i Zapad", which belongs to the group of the companies Bosco di Ciliegi, intends to set up an own factory for the production of sportswear in the industrial park "Kameshkovo" in the Vladimir region. The necessary investment will amount to Rubles 1 billion, of which Rubles 200 million are own funds and about Rubles 400 million will be requested from the fund for the development of mono towns. 

Even Pierre Cardin is talking with major Russian garment manufacturers about licensed productions, designer Rodrigo Basilikati said in March 2016. So far the fashion house is based on ten own stores and licensees from Germany, Italy and the USA.

So far most sewing orders placed in China. In future one has to expect more companies and  offers from Vietnam, Bangladesh, India, Malaysia and Indonesia. The Eurasian Economic Union and Vietnam have agreed upon a free trade agreement.
 
Import dependence on fabrics and accessories as cost risk
By manufacturing in Russia the exchange rate risk and transport costs do not apply.  But one cost risk remains: For sewing of clothes in Russia  not all fabrics and materials can be sourced domestically, but need to be purchased at 65% abroad. The technical equipment needs to be imported at 100%. In the foreseeable future this remains a cost risk, depending mainly on the development of the further exchange rates.

The main suppliers of fibers, fabrics, yarn, buttons and accessories were previously the PRC and Turkey. However - since the deterioration of the state relation with Turkey Russia is working intensively to get gradually rid of this delivery dependence.
 
Anti-crisis and development program for the light industry
In the Russian light industry 14,000 companies are manufacturing clothing, textiles, footwear and leather goods. Thereof 653 large and medium and 4,000 small businesses operate in the yarn and textile industry. To give the clothing and textile factories more planning certainty, the Russian Government decided in spring 2016 a "Strategy for the development of the light industry until 2025" and a "Federal program to support  the enterprises of the light industry" (anticrisis plan).

Russian Confederation:  Production of textiles and clothing (Change in %)
Description of goods 2015 Change 2015/2014
Cotton fiber  (mio. bales) 111.0 4.4
Man-made fiber (mio roles) 66.0 -4.5
Fabrics  (mio. sqm) 4.542 14.7
thereof:    
Natural Silk (1.000 sqm) 253.0 31.8
Wool (1.000 qm) 9,262.0 -20.9
Linen 25.9 -26.6
Cotton 1,176.0 -4.5
Man-made fiber 237.0 14.2
Fabrics made of other  materials 3,084.0 25.1
Fabrics with plastic impregnations (mio. sqm) 32.3 14.6
Bed linen (mio. sets) 59.8

-9.6

Carpets (mio. sqm) 22.6 -3.7
Knitwear (1.000 t) 14.2 29.8
Hosery (Mio. Pair) 199 -5.6
Coats (1.000 pc.) 989 -22.1
Lined jackets (1.000 pc.) 1,887 -45.4
Suits (1.000 pc.) 4,690 -12.6
Mens jackets and blazer (1.000 pc.) 870 14.1
Ladies coats with fur collar  (pc.) 5,543 -46.1
Clothing made out of artificial fur (1.000 pc.) 24.5

21.0

Uniforms and workwear (mio. pc.) 20.7 -8.2
Work – and protective wear (mio. pc.) 99.8 14.6
Overalls (1.000 pc.) 733 -62.4

Source: Rosstat 2016

Russian Confederation: - Production of textiles and clothing (% Change)
Description of goods 1st Quarter 2016 1st Quarter 2016 / 1st Quarter 2015
Sewing threads- made out of synthetic fiber (mio. rolles) 14.0 -0.6
Fabrics (billion sqm) 1.2 23.2
Bed linen (mio sets) 14.1 -7.7
Knitted stockings (mio. pairs) 55.4 34.0
Knitwear (mio. pc.) 24.8 -6.0
Workwear  Uniforms (mio. pc.) 31.1 11.2
Coats (1.000 pc. ) 269 9.1

Source: Rosstat 2016

Contact addresses
Russian Union of Entrepreneurs of  the Textile and Light Industry
107023 Moskau, uliza Malaja Semenowskaja 3
Tel.: 007 495/280 15 48, Fax: -280 10 85
E-Mail: info@souzlegprom.ru, Internet: http://www.souzlegprom.ru

Ministry of Industry and Trade
Department of Light Industry
Denis Klimentewitsch Pak, Director of the Department
109074 Moskau, Kitajgorodskij proesd 7
Tel.: 007 495/632 8004 (Sekretariat), Fax: -632 88 65
E-Mail: dgrvt@minprom.gov.ru, Internet: http://minpromtorg.gov.ru

Light industry department:
Director: Irina Ivanova Alekseewna,
Tel.: -632 87 31, -346 04 73; E-Mail: ivanovaia@minprom.gov.ru
Internet: http://minpromtorg.gov.ru/ministry/dep/#!9&click_tab_vp_ind=1

"Strategie für die Entwicklung der Leichtindustrie bis zum Jahr 2025"
http://www.kptf.ru/images/company/Presentation.pdf (Präsentation zur Strategie)
http://minpromtorg.gov.ru/docs/#!strategiya_razvitiya_legkoy_promyshlennosti_rossii_na_period_do_2025_goda (text of the strategy and action plan)

 

CZECH TEXTILE AND CLOTHING INDUSTRY INVESTS © W. Behrends/ pixelio.de
01.03.2016

CZECH TEXTILE AND CLOTHING INDUSTRY INVESTS

  • 2015 Sales reached eight-year high
  • Particularly manufacturers of technical textiles successful

Prague (gtai) - The Czech textile and clothing industry is still on the upswing. Particularly in niche segments and with technical textiles the manufacturers achieve rising revenues since years. The investment climate in the sector therefore has been improved, the equipment suppliers are benefitting. German manufacturers of machinery for the textile and clothing industry were able to expand their exports to the Czech Republic in 2015 by one fifth.

  • 2015 Sales reached eight-year high
  • Particularly manufacturers of technical textiles successful

Prague (gtai) - The Czech textile and clothing industry is still on the upswing. Particularly in niche segments and with technical textiles the manufacturers achieve rising revenues since years. The investment climate in the sector therefore has been improved, the equipment suppliers are benefitting. German manufacturers of machinery for the textile and clothing industry were able to expand their exports to the Czech Republic in 2015 by one fifth.

With Czech Crowns 52.4 billion (Kc; EUR 1.9 bn) the Czech textile industry achieved so much revenue in 2015 as not anymore in the last eight years. According to the statistics office the clothing manufacturers output rose by 11%, that of textile manufacturing by 3%. Very good filled are the order books. For companies in the clothing industry the volume of new orders rose by over 13% in 2015, in the textile factories
by 4%.

According to the announcement of the professional association ATOK, the sector would have developed even better, if the growth markets in Asia and Africa would have not weakened. But fortunately the loss became offset by the traditional markets Germany, Italy, Poland, Slovakia, Austria and France. According to ATOK the textile segment of the Czech Republic exported goods worth equivalent of almost EUR 2.5 billion in 2015, corresponding to a trade surplus of almost EUR 30 million. In clothing, the country recorded a negative balance. Here goods were imported for Euro 2 billion and exported of EUR 1.3 Billion.

Sales Development of the Czech Textile and Clothing Industry
Year Sales in Kc bn. Change to previous year (in %)
2007 55.0 1.5
2008 46.1 -16.2
2009 41.1 -10.8
2010 41.3 0.5
2011 46.2 11.9
2012 45.9 -0.6
2013 47.1 2.6
2014 51.0 8.3
2015 52.4 2.7
2007 55.0 1.5

Source: Association of Textile, Garment and Leather Industry (ATOK, http://www.atok.cz)

Particularly in niche segments the clothing manufacturers can maintain themselves in their position. For example Triola from the northern Bohemia Horni Jiretin specializes in lingerie and successfully with oversizes. Also manufacturers like Timo, Pleas, Upavan or Linia can exist with underwear products on the market. According to reports from the business paper Hospodarske noviny Timo sells 200.000 pc. per year. The company offers among others prosthetic lingerie against breat tumors.In the next two years the family operation will invest more than EUR 700,000 in new technologies at the production site Litomerice (North Bohemia).

Hats and hoods are demanded in 30 countries

Another family company, Kama from Prague, specializes in headwear. With hats, scarves, headbands, gloves or hoods it makes now more than EUR 1 million per year and delivers to 30 countries. In Moravia-Silesia Sky Paragliders from Frydlant nad Ostravici invests around EUR 4 million in a weaving mill including a research center to develop new materials. The company produces emergency parachutes and rescue systems and belongs with annual revenues of EUR 2.7 million (2014) to the top ten manufacturers worldwide. It processes 200 kilometers of fabrics annually.

Thanks to favorable wages and the proximity to areas with good purchasing power smaller suppliers of made to measure products developed well. The company Janek from Roznov in Zlin produces,for example, 30,000 individually tailored shirts per year. Also suits and costumes belong to the assortment. Janes buy the yarn from a German yarn manufacturer which produces in the Czech Republic.

Czech Republic's largest textile and clothing manufacturers (selection, sales in million Kc) 1)
Company/location Product portfolio Sales
2013
Sales
2014
Change
1)
Webseite
Borgers CS/Plzen Nonwovens for
automotives
5.038 10.879 115,9 http://borgers.cz
Juta/Dvur Kralovenad Labem Nonwovens for
automotives
5.568 6.618 18,8 http://www.juta.cz
Nova Mosilana /Brno Fancy dress fabrics 2.952 3.285 11,3 http://www.novamosilana.cz
Pegas Nonwovens/Znojmo Nonwovens 2.273 2.388 5,1 http://www.pegas.cz
Kordarna Plus/Velka nad Velickou Corduroy fabrics
Technical Textiles
for conveyors
2.195 2.287 4,2 http://www.kordarna.cz
Veba, textilni zavody/Broumov Home – and Clothing
fabrics, Brocat
2.124 2.160 1,7 http://www.veba.cz/cs/
Johnson Controls/
Strakonice 2)
Seatcovers for
automotives
1.722 1.865 8,3 http://www.johnsoncontrols.cz
Fibertex Nonwovens/
Svitavy
Nonwovens 958 1.128 17,7 http://www.fibertex.com
Pleas / Havlickuv
Brod
Under – and Nightwear 1.073 1.123 4,6 http://www.pleas.cz
Mehler Texnologies/
Lomnice nad
Popelkou 3)
Fabrics for tents,
boats, canvas, sunumbrellas
895 975 8,9 http://www.mehlertexnologies.
cz
Nejdecka cesarna
vlny/Nejdek 4)
Processing of rawwool 800 692 -13,5 http://www.ncv.cz
Lanex/Bolatice Ropes, threats,
artificial turf
627 670 6,7 http://www.lanex.cz
Trevos/Kostalov Polypropylen-
Staple-fiber
576 639 10,9 http://www.monticekia.cz
Tessitura Monti Cekia/
Borovnice u Stare
Paky
Cotton shirt fabrics 609 568 -6,7 http://www.monticekia.cz
Svitap J.H.J./Svitavy Tents, canvas, Microfibers,
Filtration
497 436 -12,3 http://www.svitap.cz

1) Change 2014 / 113 in%; 2) Fiscal year October 2012, 2013 till September 2013, 2014; 3) December 2012, 2013 till November 2013, 2014; 4) April 2013, 2014 till March 2014, 2015
Sources: Annual company reports, Trade register, Hospodarske noviny, Magazine Ekonom, CzechInvest, Association ATOK

The most actively trading companies in the textile sector are producing mostly for industrial consumers. Largest industry representative is the automotive supplier Borgers from Bocholt, which produces textile moldings, paneling, insulation and curtains for vehicles at four locations near Plzen. The second largest textile company Juta achieves half of its revenue from construction materials such as drainage mats, erosion control fabric or roof insulation. Moreover Juta makes a good business with packaging nets for potatoes or Christmas trees. One other growth area is artificial turf. The company invests nearly EUR 20 million every year, mainly in new production equipment.

Textile Machinery ordered for 250 m Euro

Other companies are expanding too. The manufacturer of workwear Waibel has expanded its site in2015. In Zdar nad Sazavou near Jihlava own collections and custom made programs are being manufactured. Clothing manufacturer Pleas invests annually over EUR 1 million in its equipment. The company belongs to the top 10 of the sector and produces annually 15 million pieces nightwear for the brands Schiesser and Pleas. The German machinery manufacturer Mayer & Cie. builds a factory for knitting machines in Vsetin. The production is expected to comence in summer 2016. The machines are designed for large manufactures particularly in Asia.

Import of important textile machinery to the Czech Republic ( EUR 1,000)
Maschinery group / HS-Position 2014 2015 Veränderung in %
Jet-spinning machines / 8444 177 15.369 8.583,1
..from Germany 59 9.829 16.559,3
Spinning machines / 8445 12.780 8.838 -30,8
..from Germany 6.591 5.017 -23,9
Weaving machines / 8446 13.357 12.778 -4,3
..from Germany 7.498 2.166 -71,1
Knitting machines / 8447 10.556 11.332 7,4
..from Germany 2.872 6.092 112,1
Auxiliary machines / 8448 75.082 72.178 -3,9
..from Germany 48.245 51.765 7,3
Machines for felting and nonwovens / 8449 3.349 16.306 386,9
..from Germany 949 6.741 610,3
Cleaning-, dying and ironing machines / 8451 83.874 105.825 26,2
..from Germany 44.671 50.234 12,5
Sewing machines / 8452 14.718 17.834 21,2
..from Germany 4.780 6.319 32,2
Machines for leather and fur processing resp. footwear production /
8453
2.867 3.704 29,2
..from Germany 278 347 24,8
Total 216.760 264.164 21,9
..from Germany 115.943 138.510 19,5

Source: Czech Statistical Office