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(c) Befeni GmbH
27.04.2021

Befeni: FashionTech contra Fast Fashion

  • Sustainable fashion through highly automated just-in-time production on customer demand

The Befeni Group, based in Langenfeld (North Rhine-Westphalia) and Bangkok (Thailand), is one of the world's leading fashion tech companies with over 200 employees and around 200,000 customised shirts and blouses sold.

Thanks to highly automated processes and just-in-time production, the fashion start-up, which has been on the market for four years, is able to offer individually designed and custom-made fashion of high quality within a very short time. In addition to shirts and blouses, the range also includes jumpers, underwear and accessories.

  • Sustainable fashion through highly automated just-in-time production on customer demand

The Befeni Group, based in Langenfeld (North Rhine-Westphalia) and Bangkok (Thailand), is one of the world's leading fashion tech companies with over 200 employees and around 200,000 customised shirts and blouses sold.

Thanks to highly automated processes and just-in-time production, the fashion start-up, which has been on the market for four years, is able to offer individually designed and custom-made fashion of high quality within a very short time. In addition to shirts and blouses, the range also includes jumpers, underwear and accessories.

At Befeni, customers are measured personally and their data is then recorded in an online system. On this basis, a pattern is created in the in-house production in Bangkok and the garment is produced as an individual one-off. The customised order is then handed over personally by trained Befeni fashion consultants.

By deliberately avoiding middlemen, the company relies on a global value chain and offers fashion from in-house production at convincing conditions: The employees in Bangkok receive above-average pay. The individually made-to-measure shirt is available at a fixed price of 39.90 EUR. And the products are sold exclusively through 5,000 qualified fashion consultants in direct sales.

Sustainable Fashion as a future market

Constant new trends, quickly produced seasonal items in quantities and the disposal of surplus items are part of everyday life in today's fashion world. In the wake of the Corona crisis, this situation has become even more acute.

„We believe that the fast fashion trend is finite and that a rethink will take place among customers, the fashion industry and producers," says Maik Ernst, founder and CEO of Befeni. "Through our highly automated business model, we are able to sell directly from our fair, in-house production, excluding any middlemen. This way, we deliver the high-quality and handmade product a maximum of 3 weeks after receiving the customer's order - with personal advice from over 5,000 qualified, independent fashion consultants."

Jan Fennel, founder of Befeni and managing director of the in-house production in Bangkok, adds: "We also want our employees in Asia to benefit from the direct connection between production and customers. We are proud to give them pleasure not only through a monetary contribution, but also through direct feedback and appreciation - for example via video directly from the customers. With our working conditions, we also want to show that health, fun and care are a central part of the work in our team.“

Rethinking: How fashion is produced and offered

The Befeni tipping principle
The company has developed a system where satisfied customers can give a tip to "their" personal tailors. This goes directly to the tailors in the company's own production without deduction. The company wants to set an example and sees this approach as proof that an international fashion company can actively work for better working conditions in the manufacturing countries.

Facts and figures four years after the company was founded

  • Production
    Befeni produced 30% more blouses and shirts in 2020 compared to the previous year.
    No fast fashion, sustainable, demand-oriented production: production only starts after customer order, made to measure according to the individual measurements of the customers.
  • Increase in turnover
    Turnover generated in 2020: around EUR 6 million, +155% compared to the previous year
  • Number of customers
    +100% compared to the previous year: the number of customers rose from 40,000 to over 80,000, of which almost 10,000 are in Austria
  • Personnel policy
    Permanent employment of employees, above-average salaries and tip principle
  • Customizing: fashion according to individual customer wishes
    Customers can choose from more than 80 fabrics, different collar and cuff shapes and designs for each fashion piece.
(c) Neonyt/Messe Frankfurt GmbH
30.03.2021

Circularity and Fashion: Interview about the Business and Communication Platform Neonyt

Circular instead of throwaway economy - from fast fashion to zero-waste philosophy. The key elements of the circular economy in the fashion business are: Avoiding waste and pollution through new processes, continuous recycling of products and materials, and regeneration of natural systems. Textination talked with Olaf Schmidt, Vice President of Textiles & Textile Technologies, and Thimo Schwenzfeier, Show Director of Neonyt, from Messe Frankfurt about the Neonyt trade show as a business and communication platform for circularity & fashion.
 
It has been about 10 years since Messe Frankfurt ventured onto the "sustainable" fashion trade show stage. Initially with the Ethical Fashion Show, then with the Greenshowroom, there were two trade show formats in Berlin dedicated to the topic of green fashion. What prompted you as a trade show organizer to launch such a special format in Germany at that time?

Circular instead of throwaway economy - from fast fashion to zero-waste philosophy. The key elements of the circular economy in the fashion business are: Avoiding waste and pollution through new processes, continuous recycling of products and materials, and regeneration of natural systems. Textination talked with Olaf Schmidt, Vice President of Textiles & Textile Technologies, and Thimo Schwenzfeier, Show Director of Neonyt, from Messe Frankfurt about the Neonyt trade show as a business and communication platform for circularity & fashion.
 
It has been about 10 years since Messe Frankfurt ventured onto the "sustainable" fashion trade show stage. Initially with the Ethical Fashion Show, then with the Greenshowroom, there were two trade show formats in Berlin dedicated to the topic of green fashion. What prompted you as a trade show organizer to launch such a special format in Germany at that time?

Olaf Schmidt: Messe Frankfurt's Texpertise Network brings together the world's most important textile trade shows - at around 60 events worldwide, we show what drives the textile and fashion industry. We present the current topics and trends and set impulses for the entire textile value chain. Messe Frankfurt recognized the need for a suitable platform for the future topic of sustainability at an early stage. It was therefore obvious to expand our expertise in the field of fashion and to meet the demand from this segment. To achieve this, we have adapted and realigned existing formats: After launching the Ethical Fashion Show in Paris in 2004, Messe Frankfurt France took over the event in 2010. Two years later, Messe Frankfurt founded the Ethical Fashion Show Berlin in Germany and found, with the moving of the event to the polarizing capital, the ideal location for the coming years. Messe Frankfurt merged the already existing Greenshowroom with the Ethical Fashion Show, and from January 2015 the two shows took place in one venue. For Messe Frankfurt, hosting these events was the next logical step on our way to a sustainable fashion future - the concept is now established in the sustainable fashion market and has a continuous growth potential. The merging of the trade show duo in 2019, with the current name Neonyt, allowed us, our exhibitors and visitors a new content orientation and a holistic approach to the topic of sustainability as well as a more direct access to the conventional fashion market, especially with regard to retail. In summer 2021, Neonyt will take place for the first time in the new fashion hotspot Frankfurt as part of the new Frankfurt Fashion Week.

 
In 2019, both event formats were merged, the new trade show Neonyt was born and 1 + 1 became what? What components does Neonyt offer in addition to the previous trade show concepts, what is so "new-new" and how did you actually come up with the name?

Thimo Schwenzfeier: One plus one, as you so nicely put it, did not simply add up to two with Neonyt. One plus one equals unique, neo-new, internationally relevant: Among other things, the trade show business was supplemented by the international conference format Fashionsustain and a showcase to gradually bring
together the topic of sustainability with the topics of technology, innovation and prepress. Our content creator format Prepeek ensures the necessary lifestyle and the fashion show provides the glamour of the fashion world. Neonyt combines the most important elements of the international textile and fashion industry - style, business, inspiration, innovation, knowledge, fun and community. And that is exactly what makes Neonyt so "new-new". Progressive and polarizing - the artificial word Neonyt is derived from the ancient Greek word "neo" (eng. new, revolutionary) and the Scandinavian word "nytt" (eng. new). "The renewed new" - Neonyt is our synonym for the fundamental transformation process of the textile and fashion industry, a reinterpretation of what has already been there and our commitment not to stand still and to promote positive change together.

 
For the Neonyt trade show format, you have teamed up with partners - for example, for conferencing components and in the design area. What expertise do they provide, and what is the added value for exhibitors and visitors?

Thimo Schwenzfeier: We know which future topics our brands and the community are currently dealing with and therefore create the right platform - for personal encounters and exchange, for networking and successful business deals. To put it simply: we organize trade shows, we organize events, we provide the right setting, we connect people and business. Neonyt therefore forms the global interface between the various players in the textile and fashion industry - between industry, trade, politics, services and consumption. And so that a lively, transparent and, above all, authentic dialog can develop between all counterparts, we naturally draw on the knowledge of industry experts and form strong partnerships to push fashion and sustainability forward. Only together can we achieve real change and guarantee that our community is provided with sufficient and, above all, the right information to make self-determined decisions.
 

In recent years, the keyword circularity - or rather closing the loop - has been encountered everywhere in the fashion industry. Whether Stella McCartney, the Ellen MacArthur Foundation, or large retail groups - many players and decision-makers are of the opinion that the future of the fashion world lies only in a circular economy and not in downcycling of any kind. What is Neonyt's view on this?
         
Thimo Schwenzfeier: That's right, the concept of circular economy is not new, nor is it limited to the textile and fashion industry. Circularity - actually the ultimate for every product, every industry, for our global society. The concept is supposedly simple: All materials and products are kept in a closed loop, the useful life is increased and at the end of the product life cycle everything is recycled. Many sustainable fashion labels are already showing how it's done. Neonyt brands are right at the forefront and are already implementing practices that should become the norm as soon as possible: starting with T-shirts or shoes made from recycled materials and take-back systems for collection items. As well as compostable clothing that "dissolves" at the end of the product life cycle and breaks down into its natural components, and on to repair services and leasing models for denim and co. - thinking holistically, acting in a sustainable manner and producing in a circular way are definitely the trends of the coming fashion seasons and at least one important, if not the most important, component of the future fashion world.

 
For the idea of a circular economy to be implemented successfully, there needs to be an interplay between technology, production, design and sales. What presentation options and forms of communication does Neonyt have in store for the various components?  

Thimo Schwenzfeier: The combined innovative power of technology, sustainability and digitization is an important driver of the current developments in the textile and fashion industry - including the topic of circularity. Processes and production sequences are changing along the entire value chain - the industry has to reinvent itself for the most part. Neonyt shows how this can work successfully in the long term, with the internationally established Fashionsustain conference format - including spin-offs in China, Europe and the USA - and the supplementary Showcase. Together, these two formats offer the ideal mix of orientation and inspiration to prepare the industry for the future. Virtual fashion, authentic brands and textile value chains, science and innovation as well as retail, business models and impact investment - at Fashionsustain, top-class experts will exchange ideas with an interested professional audience and discuss the change and new solutions in the textile and fashion industry. The Neonyt Showcase takes a deeper look at the topics and innovations presented and discussed on the Fashionsustain stage. Expert knowledge on-demand, so to speak: whether microfactories or installations - Neonyt brands as well as brands from the rest of the Texpertise Network of Messe Frankfurt, such as exhibitors at Texprocess, get the chance to present sustainable innovations, new technologies and materials, initiatives, change-maker campaigns or research projects. Here they interact directly and practically with Neonyt's international cross-sector community.
 

Last year was an unprecedented challenge for trade show companies due to the pandemic situation. Neonyt was also affected by this - and physical events had to be canceled. With a digital format "Neonyt on Air" you have tried to offer exhibitors and visitors an alternative platform. What has been your experience: Did the focus of the trade show and its community perhaps even help to make such a virtual event easier to launch? 

Olaf Schmidt: Corona has already changed a lot and will certainly continue to do so in one way or another. Nevertheless, it will continue to be our task as trade show organizers to offer the industry the best possible meeting platforms for presenting their new products worldwide. We are convinced that people will continue to want to meet in person and discuss new products as well as services in the future. This is particularly the case in the textile sector, where haptics plays a very crucial role. We expect that there will even be a certain catch-up effect after the crisis. Because what the last two very successful digital seasons of Neonyt on Air, for example, have nevertheless shown clearly: Fashion lives from personalities, presentation and inspiration. Digital formats can support this, but they cannot fully replace it.
 
Thimo Schwenzfeier: The digital Neonyt on Air was far from being a total replacement for the original physical seasons, but nevertheless a huge success. For one week, fashion, lifestyle and digital experts were discussing about more authenticity, immediacy and transparency in the textile and fashion industry in numerous keynotes, interviews and panel discussions. With more than 24,000 international followers on Instagram, we generated around 50,000 impressions and more than 4,700 content interactions with our presenting partners Grüner Knopf, Hessnatur and Oeko-Tex in just five days. These figures show, that the topic of sustainability has arrived in the middle of society and is being discussed across all industries. I think that the polarization and, above all, the prevailing restrictions, as far as trade and commerce are concerned, have certainly contributed to holding a successful digital format. Digitization was truly the booster for the fashion industry in this case: Instead of replacing personal exchange, it helps to maintain and expand the business activities of brands, especially in the current times. And quite clearly, the need for exchange in the fashion industry and the motivation to initiate together a change are still enormous. Neonyt on Air has once again shown us that clearly. However, we are already looking forward to the next physical edition of Neonyt.
 

The COVID-19 pandemic has also left its mark on the textile and clothing industry. When you look back on just under a year of "state of emergency" - what positive experiences do you take with you, where do you see a need for improvement, for what support are you grateful for and where did you feel you were left on your own? 

Olaf Schmidt: A year like no other - that can clearly be said about the last one. The Corona pandemic caught everyone off guard - us as trade show organizers, but of course also our exhibitors, visitors and partners. Especially in the near future, we must continue to expect, that trade shows can only be held under stricter health and safety regulations at first. Messe Frankfurt reacted quickly and developed a comprehensive safety and hygiene concept. One thing was clear: we all had to adjust and deal with a new situation. And so far, we've done a great job together, the team understanding among each other, the close contact - although physically at a distance, but globally networked - between all those involved, makes me feel positive about the future. For me, an important realization of this global pandemic, a credo almost, is to be open to new ways and opportunities and to find ways to combine things rather than separate them: Hybrid solutions, so to speak.    

Thimo Schwenzfeier: There was no master plan for Neonyt, and in places there was also the impression that we now had to "reinvent the wheel": How does collaboration work when face-to-face meetings cannot take place? Can digitized contact compensate for the social distancing that is currently being imposed and still make it possible to work closely together? How can business relationships be maintained when stores are closed? How can priorities be set when well-tested solutions and established annual plans lose their validity? Who am I, who are 'the others' and what defines community? Never have questions about our creation and existence, about what makes us who we are and what we want to be, been more relevant than right now. One thing that I take away from the current situation and that allows me to continue to look forward positively despite difficult circumstances is the fact, that cohesion and solidarity with one another - both privately and professionally - have become increasingly important. Like a magnifying glass, the crisis has magnified existing opportunities, but also challenges, and brought the essentials into focus. I think that if we continue to try to experience things more consciously and not take them for granted, we will manage together to create a " new normal " and leave this crisis with more strength.
 

As in the past in Berlin, Neonyt is currently also located in Frankfurt in the environment of the Fashion Week and conventional trade shows. Can you imagine that a special event concept like Neonyt will be unnecessary in a few years, because the circularity concept will have established itself in the clothing industry worldwide?

Olaf Schmidt: A clear no. Sustainability per se is already no longer a unique selling point. The important thing is to keep up with the times, to follow trends or, even better, to track down new trends yourself and develop them further. Things, strategies, concepts will always change - if last year showed us one thing, it was certainly that. It is more than desirable that we all learn from this crisis and reflect on the really important values, on solidarity between partners, on climate protection and sustainability. It may be exactly for this reason, that companies that place particular emphasis on sustainability will emerge even stronger from this crisis. So you can be sure that we, as a leading international trade show organizer for the textile industry, will continue to focus on sustainability and support future-oriented companies and solutions. However, this will not make our formats obsolete due to the establishment and normalization of holistic business practices in the textile industry. But it is impossible to make an exact forecast for the coming decades. Over the last few months, we have all noticed ourselves in our personal everyday lives or in our professional lives, how uncertain and volatile the future is. What is clear, however, is that the fashion industry - the world in general - will change even faster than before. And therein lies the opportunity for formats like Neonyt. The ten-year history shows in how many directions Neonyt has already developed, content focal points have been shifted and it has reinvented itself - this will also be the case in the future.
 

Mr. Schwenzfeier, in addition to your role as Director of Marketing Communications for Messe Frankfurt's textile exhibitions, you have also been Show Director of Neonyt since 2018. You have spoken to many exhibitors and visitors - which ideas or creations have particularly impressed you?

Thimo Schwenzfeier: I think it's not so much the individual innovations or creations of the exhibitors at our trade shows. And I deliberately choose the plural here. Because in my function as Director of Marketing Communications in the Textiles & Textile Technologies division of Messe Frankfurt, Neonyt is just one of "my" events. I think it's more the variety of fashion, technical and professional innovations that brands, labels, companies, start-ups and designers present every year. But if I really had to choose one innovation, it would probably be the vegan "Currywurst" sneakers made of red pepper and recycled PET bottles - the same label also offers shoes made of wood, stone, coffee and mushrooms or now even meteorite particles. It is impressive to experience every season anew of how creative the textile and fashion industry is.
 

Breaking new ground means being willing to make decisions, overcoming fears - and thus also having the courage to fail. Not every project can succeed. In retrospect, about which entrepreneurial decision by Messe Frankfurt are you particularly glad, that you made?
 
Olaf Schmidt: Clearly the decision to create Neonyt. To establish our own trade show format for fashion, sustainability and innovation and to integrate the freedom and lifestyle, which entail this topic, into our event. After more than a decade, we may be saying goodbye to Berlin in 2021, but not to our community and our spirit. Together we look back on many fashionable seasons and great locations in the capital: starting in the Hotel Adlon Kempinski to the Ewerk, the Postbahnhof, the Kronprinzenpalais, the Funkhaus and the Kraftwerk to the last physical event in Tempelhof. With the turn of the year and in the setting of Frankfurt Fashion Week, Neonyt is about to move to the metropolis by the Main. In Frankfurt, worlds collide: Skyscrapers and 19th-century villas. Architectural sins and masterpieces. Business and middle class. Red-light district and luxury boulevard. Frankfurt Fashion Week sets new impulses in this area of conflict. And in the middle of all this is Neonyt. The signs are pointing to a new beginning - a restart for the entire fashion industry, together we are taking sustainability to the next level - the focus topics Applied Sustainability and Applied Digitization are creating a completely new Fashion Week ecosystem in the metropolis by the Main.
 

If everything works out, Neonyt can be held again as a face-to-face event for the first time in July 2021. What are your plans? What and who can visitors look forward to? And what backup is there for a worst-case scenario?

Thimo Schwenzfeier: Of course, due to the currently ongoing tense situation around Covid-19, it is difficult to make binding statements about the next physical event. However, we are cur rently expecting the situation to ease into the summer summer 2021 is therefore on the health of everyone - exhibitors, visitors, partners and employees of Neonyt. Messe Frankfurt has developed a concept that includes detailed hygienic measures: Hygiene, distance and fresh air supply are important factors, which we coordinate with the responsible authorities in Frankfurt and those in charge of Frankfurt Fashion Week. In due course, the Neonyt community will receive advice and recommendations for the trade show attendance and participation, that comply with current regulations. We have not yet thought about a concrete backup for a worst-case scenario, as we are currently anticipating a physical B2B event - but the last two seasons have shown, should it not be possible to hold the Neonyt face-to-face, that we are quite well positioned with the digital Neonyt on Air and could certainly adapt the format for another summer event. We regularly exchange ideas with all market participants and try to get a sense of opinions and wishes from our community through surveys. Wait and see, one might say - in the end, we also have to act according to what the current health situation allows and what decisions are made by politicians.

The Interview was conducted by Ines Chucholowius,
Managing Partner, Textination GmbH

PERFORMANCE DAYS Nothing to Waste - Closing the Loop (c) PERFORMANCE DAYS
20.10.2020

PERFORMANCE DAYS Nothing to Waste - Closing the Loop

  • Finite resources and endless mountains of rubbish set the tone of the upcoming 25th edition of PERFORMANCE DAYS. Closing the loop means nothing is wasted, not even time, as recycled clothing gets recycled again and again.

In keeping with this topic, the trade fair organizers are planning expert discussion panels to help present the facts as well as visions of the future. Expect the corresponding displays of sustainable materials, chosen by the PERFORMANCE FORUM Jury. Look for materials such as fibers from recycled PET bottles, recyclable mono-component materials or blends, and shirts that decompose to biomass in a "Cradle-to-Cradle" approach. "Nothing to Waste - Closing the Loop" is open to the public at the Messe München fairgrounds and as a Digital Fair online starting on December 9-10, 2020.

  • Finite resources and endless mountains of rubbish set the tone of the upcoming 25th edition of PERFORMANCE DAYS. Closing the loop means nothing is wasted, not even time, as recycled clothing gets recycled again and again.

In keeping with this topic, the trade fair organizers are planning expert discussion panels to help present the facts as well as visions of the future. Expect the corresponding displays of sustainable materials, chosen by the PERFORMANCE FORUM Jury. Look for materials such as fibers from recycled PET bottles, recyclable mono-component materials or blends, and shirts that decompose to biomass in a "Cradle-to-Cradle" approach. "Nothing to Waste - Closing the Loop" is open to the public at the Messe München fairgrounds and as a Digital Fair online starting on December 9-10, 2020.

The PERFORMANCE DAYS trade fair has chosen a new Focus Topic that concerns not only our own industry. The textile industry has long been achieving more efficient production by recycling its own waste products and using recycled materials from outside the industry, for example, PET-bottles. Nevertheless, textiles exist alongside glass, paper, metal, and plastics as a separate branch of waste management. Despite ambitious efforts at recycling by the waste and textile industries, the efficient use of textile waste as a resource remains a challenge. Compounding this challenge are the difficulties caused by a global world: production, consumers, and disposal sites are miles apart, shared expert knowledge about the other industries is lacking, and international standards and political support are nearly non-existent.

Final destination: the waste bin
Information from the Federal Office for the Environment shows that 0.8% of the oil produced is used in the textile industry for the production of new textiles. But the costly processing chain of this finite resource ends all too quickly in waste. A Greenpeace survey reveals outdated fashions or clothing of worn quality is thrown away within three years, only to land in the trash dumpsters. The European Environmental Agency estimates that 5.8 million tons of used textiles are discarded every year and either incinerated, used for landfill, or taken to mechanical-biological sewage treatment plants. Even if used clothing is collected by state or private companies, in many cases it cannot be sold (as second hand), donated, or recycled (into rags or insulating material). In the best case scenario, it is incinerated and converted to thermal energy.

Recycling and circular design
From an economic and environmental perspective, the term recycling refers to waste-free products, waste avoidance, and waste recovery and disposal. In our industry as it stands, recycling at the end of the product life cycle usually means converting the product into some other product, i.e., not clothing. This is the "Open-Loop" process. Accordingly, textiles are eventually incinerated, but the amount of energy recovered can vary greatly depending on how efficiently the waste incineration plant works. Such devaluing of the product to a product with less value than the original product is known as Downcycling. However, Downcycling is not the only solution: the "Closed-Loop" approach has the goal of making new clothes out of old ones through recycling. The closed loop for renewable natural resources, for example, can mean that natural fibers used in textiles will end up becoming soil, which is the nutrient for new natural fibers, i.e., a cradle-to-cradle approach. Synthetic garments similarly require extracting the man-made fibers and reprocessing them to produce another garment.

Planning for the end in advance
Rather than thinking about recycling opportunities at the end of the product life cycle, brands can already begin developing closed loop options while in the design phase. Among other things, designing out the waste can reduce the environmental impact of the products. To extend the useful life, consider leasing the materials and/or adding labels with instructions for disposal, repair, or repurposing. And, what about the idea of preparing 100% used textiles that can be reintroduced into the supply chain as 100% new textiles? Separating the different types of fiber used in blends is complex, cost-intensive, and further complicated when labels are non-existent (or no longer existing) or it is simply not (yet) technically possible. More and more clothing makers and suppliers are trying to avoid mixing fibers and are switching to "mono-materials" or "mono-components." Shirts are easy to make in this way, but if you add buttons, zippers, etc., the issue becomes more complex.

Nothing to waste - not even time
If you are like many end consumers, brand managers, and producers and want to make use of valuable resources in a more sustainable manner, register now on the trade fair website under "Visitor Login." There you can access a free trade fair ticket for December 9-10, 2020. You can also learn about the complimentary and soon to be expanded offers at the Digital Fair. Don’t forget to sign-up for the free Newsletter mailings. 

•     09.-10. December 2020      DIGITAL FAIR  Trends Winter 2022/23 

 

UPDATE
CoVid-19 continues to keep the world on edge. Many PERFORMANCE DAYS visitors, as well as exhibitors, have already announced that travelling to Munich in December would be simply impossible for them. Due to the increasing number of infections, further international travel bans and company-internal travel restrictions are now threatening. As a result, the December 2020 edition of PERFORMANCE DAYS will unfortunately not take place at the Messe München, but as Digital Fair! On the planned dates of December 09-10, both approved and advanced new tools will go online and provide further proof of PERFORMANCE DAYS’ expansion of its pioneering role in creating a digital textile trade fair experience.

 

Photocredits: Hohenstein
01.09.2020

Research Projects of the Zuse Community: Think about Recycling when Designing …

How applied research in cooperation with industry can lead to high-quality recycling solutions is explained by the Zuse community with its "Design for Recycling" series.

How applied research in cooperation with industry can lead to high-quality recycling solutions is explained by the Zuse community with its "Design for Recycling" series.

Artificial Turf of the Future
Textiles are much more than just clothes. The industry is a key customer for both synthetic and natural fibers. However, their textile products are often close to the consumer - this applies, for example, to the leisure industry or sports field construction, as is the case with artificial turf.
     
On sports fields, textiles are, so to speak, trampled underfoot, namely when playing on artificial turf. In Germany alone there are around 5,000 artificial turf pitches registered for football. But under the green stubble hides a heavy burden - for clubs and the environment. According to information from the IAKS Germany trade association, around 5 kg of granulate per square meter of artificial turf is infilled in Germany, and this figure is likely to be considerably higher in other countries. "In the case of artificial turf with a fiber length of 42 mm, only 12 mm look out of the mass of infill materials that have been applied to the surface," Dr. Ulrich Berghaus of Morton Extrusionstechnik GmbH, a leading manufacturer of artificial turf, explains. Nowadays, a new pitch is calculated to contain almost 50 percent of the old pitch - as infill material. But as a microplastic this can cause problems - alternatives have to be found. Together with the Aachen Institute for Floor Systems (TFI), Morton Extrusionstechnik is working on the artificial turf of the future, which can do without problematic infill materials.

The researchers at the TFI are now called upon to ensure that the nubs of the artificial turf will hold well in the carrier material in future, even without polyurethane and latex. "Ideally, artificial turf would be made of just one polymer," TFI project manager Dirk Hanuschik says. Because, similar to food packaging, inseparable material composites are poison for high-quality recycling. Hanuschik and his team are therefore researching with their industrial partner into an artificial turf design that does not require any polyurethane or latex for the backing of the carrier material. In a thermobonding facility, the artificial turf nubs are to be melted directly onto the base material, not glued on. Nevertheless, a durability of around 12-15 years is the goal - as with artificial turf laid today. He can test the new materials on the industrial coating plant, which is on a smaller scale at the TFI. The first production plant is scheduled to go into operation as early as the middle of next year.
     
"The practical project of the TFI is an excellent example of how industrial research from the Zuse community creates concrete benefits for people through sustainable recycling management. Research on 'Design for Recycling' is the focus of many of our institutes. Their close cooperation with companies and their interdisciplinary approach offer the best conditions for further innovations," explains the President of the Zuse Community, Prof. Martin Bastian.


Recycling in the Fashion Industry
Recycling is more than just a trend. In the future, fashion should increasingly include useful recycling: People in Germany buy an average of 26 kg of textiles per capita per year, including 12-15 kg of clothing. Given these large quantities, high-quality recycling is a major challenge. Improved recycling includes a circular economy that thinks about the "life after", i.e. the next or renewed product, already when designing products. A current research project of the Zuse community shows how this can work for clothing.
     
Beverage bottles made of the plastic PET are already ideally suited for recycling, and not only for packaging, because of their purity of type. Under the motto "From the fiber to the fiber", this is what the applied research in the joint project DiTex is using for rental linen. The fibers used come from recycled PET bottles, and the rented linen itself is to be recycled back into linen after its first life cycle.

"Rented linen is also well suited to the 'Design for Recycling' concept because its use can be precisely tracked, which provides optimum conditions for recycling," project manager Dr. Anja Gerhardts from the Hohenstein Research Institute explains. The institute from Baden-Württemberg is responsible for textile testing and product specifications in the project initiated and coordinated by the Institute for Ecological Economic Research (IÖW). For benefit rather than ownership, the partners in the alliance are developing a recyclable line of bed linen, as well as polo and business shirts. The shirts will serve as uniforms for police and rescue services.

Intelligent label stores information
The laundry is equipped with a digital tracking ID throughout the entire usage cycle. This "intelligent" label stores information such as fiber origin, material composition and composition of the textile. This enables recycling companies to sort the products better, increase the recycling share and upgrade them. Numerous washing trials are now being carried out at Hohenstein to test how well the tracking tool is performing and what the tensile strength, degree of whiteness, color quality, durability and wearing comfort of the textiles are when they are washed, spun and dried up to 200 times in commercial textile services. "In DiTex we bring users, procurers and recyclers of textiles to one table to make recyclable product design a reality", Anja Gerhardts explains.

"Practical research on fibers and textiles is one of the core competences of many of our institute, be it for industrial technical products or consumer-oriented products. Projects like DiTex show innovative solutions for design for recycling. Thanks to the interdisciplinary approach in our association, other industries can also learn from such solutions," explains Dr. Annette Treffkorn, managing director of the Zuse community.

Source:

Zuse-Gemeinschaft

TV TecSTyle Visions proved its status as a leading trade fair of the European textile decoration industry in an impressive way. (c) Messe Stuttgart
11.02.2020

TV TECSTYLE VISIONS: IMPRESSIVE CONFIRMATION OF STATUS AS LEADING TRADE FAIR

  • High internationality and excellent visitor quality ensure top ra-tings

The trade fair combination for visual communication and haptic adver-tising, EXPO 4.0, was an impressive event with 421 exhibitors and 12,518 visitors held from 30 January to 1 February 2020 in Stuttgart:

  • High internationality and excellent visitor quality ensure top ra-tings

The trade fair combination for visual communication and haptic adver-tising, EXPO 4.0, was an impressive event with 421 exhibitors and 12,518 visitors held from 30 January to 1 February 2020 in Stuttgart:
TV TecStyle Visions, trade fair for textile decoration and promotion, enriched the trade fair combination with a top-class exhibitor offering, high internationality and an accompanying programme characterised by innovations and know-how transfer. It proved its status as a leading trade fair for the European textile decoration industry in an impressive way: 262 exhibitors, including all relevant companies from the exhibition segments textiles and technology, mark the importance as a European industry get-together every two years in Stuttgart. The leading trade fair confronts the uncertain European market situation and uncertainties in trade, the number of exhibitors remained almost constant compared to the previous event (2018: 270). The 126 international exhibitors came from 21 countries to Stuttgart. The top 5 countries of origin are Germany, Great Britain, Spain, Poland and Italy.
 
Many decision-makers from the Germany/Austria/Switzerland region
Within the framework of TV TecStyle Visions the visitors were particularly interested in the different printing processes, embroidery and textiles. The EXPO 4.0 trade fair combination attracted 17 per cent international visitors from 50 countries to Stuttgart. The appeal of the leading European trade fair is manifested with the top visitor countries Switzerland and Austria. 35 percent of all visitors to TV TecStyle Visions travelled more than 300 kilometres to Stuttgart.

The quality of the visitors has been a reliable constant for years: four out of five visitors are actively involved in purchasing and procurement decisions, 87 percent have concrete intentions to invest and 84 percent of the visitors want to invest in the next 12 months. An overall rating of the trade fair combination of 2.0 ("good") and a return visit rate for 4 out of 5 visitors highlight the positive synergy effects created by the parallel timing of the three trade fairs in the trade fair combination EXPO 4.0. This is also reflected in the amount of time visitors spend at the event - on average 4.8 hours at the three trade fairs.
 
Comprehensive accompanying programme
Apart from the exhibition offering, TV TecStyle Visions has been convincing for years with a comprehensive accompanying programme. Not only real innovations and trends that move the industry are showcased at the stands. At this year's trade fair the TecCheck Area acts as a look into the near future. In the digital microfactory nine companies demonstrated the possibilities of digitalisation in production under the coordination of DITF (German Institutes for Textile and Fibre Research, Denkendorf). A polo-shirt was made in one hour, from the 3D design and conception, through to the printing, thermosetting, cutting and making-up of the garment. The trend topics of the industry and the degree of innovation were also shown in the forum, such as the option of personalisation and automation in textile finishing/textile decoration/garment decoration. The TecStyle Fashion Show, the forum and also Charlie's Corner gave visitors a platform to exchange information and ideas and for know-how transfer, as well as another presentation possibility for the exhibitors.
 
The next TV TecStyle Visions takes place in the EXPO 4.0 trade fair combination with WETEC and GiveADays in two years. The dates 10 to 12 February 2022 are currently reserved.

TV TECSTYLE VISIONS: TRADE FAIR ATTENDANCE WITH VALUE-ADDED (c) Messe Stuttgart
17.12.2019

TV TECSTYLE VISIONS: TRADE FAIR ATTENDANCE WITH VALUE-ADDED

  • More than just a product exhibition
  • Talent promotion during the Young Professionals Day

Knowledge transfer and inspiration are the focal points of the accompanying programme of TV TecStyle Visions which will be held in Stuttgart from 30 January to 1 February 2020. In addition to a broad product portfolio, the eleventh edition of Europe's leading trade fair will offer trade visitors various special shows and technical forums in the L-Bank Forum (Hall 1).

  • More than just a product exhibition
  • Talent promotion during the Young Professionals Day

Knowledge transfer and inspiration are the focal points of the accompanying programme of TV TecStyle Visions which will be held in Stuttgart from 30 January to 1 February 2020. In addition to a broad product portfolio, the eleventh edition of Europe's leading trade fair will offer trade visitors various special shows and technical forums in the L-Bank Forum (Hall 1).

Knowledge transfer for doers
The special technical show TecCheck Area is a new addition to TV TecStyle Visions: Visitors will be able to follow the complete production process for a polo shirt during this special show. A shirt - from its 3-D design through to the finished product - will be produced live within one hour on stand 1B80 in a digital textile micro factory, i.e. a digitally networked production line. The German Institute for Textile and Fibre Research (DITF) is responsible for the technical management of this special show with the support of Albstadt-Sigmaringen University and Cologne University of Applied Sciences. Renowned manufacturers and retailers such as Assyst, Caddon, HP, Multi-Plot Europe, Schöller Textil, Rebstock Consulting and Zünd Systemtechnik will present the latest products on the market for the live production demonstration. The production line will bridge the gap between virtual and real products, virtual reality and networked production, based on specific requirements.

In Charlie’s Corner Charlie Taublieb alias Dr. Print will shed light on the technical aspects of textile finishing by means of screen printing. On Stand 1C11 visitors will be able to print a T-shirt themselves under the supervision of this expert and profit from his know-how through its design. Together with his expert network, Dr. Print will be pleased to answer all unresolved questions.

Fair trade, sustainable products and ecological production methods are in demand. At the fair•eco•bio Infopoint (Stand 1G22) experts such as Mantis, Neutral and HRM will explain in more detail to visitors how the production, sale and finishing of advertising textiles are organised sustainably. Interested trade visitors will have an opportunity themselves to print a sustainably produced item of clothing using water-based inks.The programme of the Technical Forum (Stand 1D22) will include talks and best practice examples relating to the topics of smart textiles, finishing techniques and sustainability. Panel discussions in which experts from the industry talk about the latest developments in the industry will also be held every day. These discussions will be followed by a get-together which will enable visitors and participants to carry out networking.

Experience inspiration live 
During the TecStyle Fashion Show on Stand 1H70, models and dancers will present the latest fashion trends and outfits in a show accompanied by music. The show will feature the latest collections from    
renowned national and international textile labels such as HAKRO, JHK, Adler Czech, Result Clothing, Falk&Ross, Master Italia, Premier and Promodoro.

Talent promotion: Young Professionals Day
The Young Professionals Day will be held for the first time and is aimed at industry newcomers. Schoolchildren, students and young professionals are invited to attend the Action Day (30 January 2020) in order to become acquainted with the occupational fields of EXPO 4.0, i.e. textile finishing, advertising technology and visual communication. Students from the Stuttgart Media University and Messe
Stuttgart are jointly developing a programme by young professionals for young professionals. The Young Professionals Day will feature special talks, hands-on activities and tours of the trade fair tailored directly to the target group.

Information for visitors
TV TecStyle Visions will be held from 30 January to 1 February 2020 concurrently with the trade fairs WETEC and GiveADays in the L-Bank Forum (Hall 1) at Messe Stuttgart. Europe's leading trade fair for textile finishing and promotion will be open from 09.30 to 18.00 on Thursday and Friday, 30 and 31 January 2020, and from 09.30 to 17.00 on Saturday, 1 February 2020. Visitors attending TV TecStyle Visions can access the event via the Entrance East which directly adjoins the L-Bank Forum (Hall 1). A total of 7,000 parking spaces are available in the area around the trade fair grounds while the S-Bahn (suburban train) at Stuttgart Airport is just a few minutes walk away.
Tickets for TV TecStyle Visions can be purchased online at: www.tecstyle-visions.com/ticket. A free day ticket is available with the promotion code "TV20IhrTicket" and entitles the holder to visit all events in the EXPO 4.0 trade fair combination.
 
About EXPO 4.0 – Print.Produce.Promote.
EXPO 4.0 is the leading platform for visual communication and haptic advertising. The three trade fairs TV TecStyle Visions, WETEC and GiveADays showcase new products and innovations in the areas of textile finishing, advertising technology and promotion. In spring 2018, the trade fair combination recorded a total of 566 exhibitors from 28 countries and 13,700 trade visitors from 41 countries.

More information:
TV TECSTYLE VISIONs
Source:

Messe Stuttgart

PromoTex Expo (c) PromoTex Expo
08.10.2019

Make your brand wearable - PromoTex Expo to enter second round in 2020

  • Sustainability at the Textile Campus
  • Make your shirt: Digital textile finishing process

It’s colourful, it’s loud and it shouts: “Make your brand wearable!” With its new claim PromoTex Expo brings together textile finishers and experts, signmakers, designers, promotional product distributors, agencies and marketeers to present their highlights in promotion, sports and workwear. The event will once again be held concurrently with PSI and viscom from 7 – 9 January 2020. Together these three trade shows – boasting optimised hall occupancy – form the World of Advertising and Selling.

  • Sustainability at the Textile Campus
  • Make your shirt: Digital textile finishing process

It’s colourful, it’s loud and it shouts: “Make your brand wearable!” With its new claim PromoTex Expo brings together textile finishers and experts, signmakers, designers, promotional product distributors, agencies and marketeers to present their highlights in promotion, sports and workwear. The event will once again be held concurrently with PSI and viscom from 7 – 9 January 2020. Together these three trade shows – boasting optimised hall occupancy – form the World of Advertising and Selling.

A total of 14.9 billion euros in sales are generated annually in Europe by the business with promotional items: This is shown by the "Industry Structure Analysis 2017-19", the first empirical study on the European promotional products industry. The structural data collected on markets, suppliers and retailers systematically and representatively covers the entire value chain.

The study shows: More than one third of the total European turnover is generated by micro-enterprises with fewer than 10 employees. Together with large companies with more than 250 employees, they form the main source of sales in our industry. Together they account for more than half of the turnover. Germany generated with total 3,5 billion Euro about 23 of the European annual business and is thus one of the top 10 nations in the European promotional products industry.
 
PromoTex Expo to move closer to PSI again
Exhibitors’ wishes and needs were centre stage when allocating hall space for this trio of trade shows. This is also why PromoTex Expo will move closer to PSI again occupying parts of Hall 12 in future. In exchange for this, floor space so far unexploited in the other halls will be used for selling. “On the one hand, this move allows us to preserve the independence of PromoTex Expo within this alliance and, on the other, to ensure the proximity with PSI called for by the market,” says Director Petra Lassahn accounting for this move and adding: “Upon the request of both exhibitors and visitors we will already be implementing this adjustment in 2020 and, hence, one year earlier than planned.”

viscom will find its new home in Hall 13. Two walkways create a direct connection between the two trade shows thereby ensuring optimum visitor flows. The trade show for visual communication will also be directly accessible via the entrances Ost and Nord-Ost. As a result, the tactile, textile and visual forms of communication will again be presented under the same roof and within even easier reach at the beginning of the year. As before, admission to all three trade shows will be exclusively restricted to qualified trade visitors and PSI members.
 
Sustainability a trend at the Textile Campus
In Hall 12 visitors to PromoTex Expo will find such familiar faces in this industry as TeeJays, Lynka, Vossen, Matterhorn, Regatta and MASCOT International A/S. However, new faces like stilfaser and the IGUANA GROUP will also feature, introducing their product highlights as part of the international trade show.

Alongside the exhibitors’ ranges an extensive line-up of side events will also convince visitors. Serving as a centre piece here will be the Textile Campus. In cooperation with sustainable companies, it will be shown how new workwear is created from plastic fished from the sea or how old clothes are turned into new promotional textiles. The focus is on ideas from innovative companies that use them to make production and trade fairer and ecological. On the catwalk adjacent to the campus, the participating exhibitors will present their latest collections to a wide audience.
 
Strolling along the fashion Boulevard
Visitors looking for innovations and directions in the fields of sports, career, promotion and leisure will find these at a glance at the new Boulevard. The corridor leads completely through the exhibition hall and shows the trends in a theme-oriented and staged way.

The production chain from design to finished product will be featured on the special area “Mach Dein Shirt/Make your Shirt” in Hall 13. Under the heading “Textil 4.0” this area will focus on Mass Customisation. IT experts and solutions providers will guide visitors through tomorrow’s buying process using a QR code. Once these have generated a print motif, they issue a print job and then follow their individual QR code on its way through the finishing process up to shipping. In an illustrative way, the linking of digital IT solutions with analogue finishing techniques will be demonstrated here, with the IT solution care of our curated partner Smake playing a key role. In the process, the synergies between tactile, textile and visual communications become apparent and with it the concept underlying this trade show triad.
          
About PromoTex Expo
All facets of Mass Customisation, smart clothes, sustainability in the textile chain as well as textile finishing as a service: these are the trend themes of PromoTex Expo. As a new information and knowledge platform for this industry the trade show for Promotion, Sports and Workwear in Düsseldorf is the central point of contact for international textile finishers, promotional product distributors, signmakers, designers, textile experts, retail and agencies. After its successful debut in January 2019 attended by 13,217 trade visitors from 39 nations, the forthcoming event will be held in Düsseldorf from 7 to 9 January 2020 – concurrently with the trade shows PSI – Leading European Trade Show of the Promotional Products Industry and viscom – European Trade Show for Visual Communication. Taken together they form Europe’s biggest trade show alliance for Advertising and Selling.

Copyright photos: MEX Exhibitions Pvt. Ltd. / Messe Frankfurt
06.08.2019

DIGITEX SHOW 2019 GEARS UP FOR ANOTHER MILESTONE

Digital textile printing technologies to take Centre Stage at Gartex Texprocess India 2019 – the 3-day comprehensive exhibition on complete supply-chain of garmenting & textile manufacturing solutions

India’s leading trade show, dedicated completely to garmenting and textile manufacturing solutions and technologies, Gartex Texprocess India is scheduled from 10-12 August 2019. Spread over 1,50,000 sq. ft. exhibit area, the show will be held across six halls in Pragati Maidan, wherein more than 200 companies will display over 400 brands. A hub dedicated completely for showcasing and highlighting latest developments in machinery, inks, software and services in digital textile printing, the Show is designed to take the country’s fabric printing & apparel industry to the next level.

Digital textile printing technologies to take Centre Stage at Gartex Texprocess India 2019 – the 3-day comprehensive exhibition on complete supply-chain of garmenting & textile manufacturing solutions

India’s leading trade show, dedicated completely to garmenting and textile manufacturing solutions and technologies, Gartex Texprocess India is scheduled from 10-12 August 2019. Spread over 1,50,000 sq. ft. exhibit area, the show will be held across six halls in Pragati Maidan, wherein more than 200 companies will display over 400 brands. A hub dedicated completely for showcasing and highlighting latest developments in machinery, inks, software and services in digital textile printing, the Show is designed to take the country’s fabric printing & apparel industry to the next level.

The 4th edition of the Show is gearing up incorporating DIGITEX Show highlighting the developments and innovations taking place in the digital textile printing technology, which is eventually picking up fast in the apparel manufacturing industry across the country. More than 20,000 enthusiastic visitors are expected to witness the latest developments during the three days of extreme business activities. They would not only take a glimpse of what new has hit the turf in the digital textile printing, but will also experience the newest technologies through various live demonstrations that the leading brands catering to the solution for soft signage and sublimation printing would put on the display.

The transformation in digital technologies over the past few years has been tremendous, which the organisers found important to bring forth under the DIGITEX @ Gartex Texprocess 2019. The advancement in technologies and rapidly increasing awareness has brought it at a revolution of sorts. Digitex hopes to become a one-stop solution hub for the latest machinery, inks, software and services to serious buyers and decision makers of the digital textile printing industry. The Show would also witness renowned brands offering live demo of their respective machines to let the visitors feel and appreciate the development taking place in the fabric digital printing arena which is slowly but steadily picking up.

Ever since direct to garment (DTG) printing has been introduced, textile printing industry has started finding new horizons with a fast and flexible production solution that delivers exceptional image quality, which in turn is opening up new doors of opportunities for those who are willing to enter into the apparel industry or are eager to expand their garmenting & textile business. Digitex @ Gartex Texprocess India is an important event for the digital printing technology leaders as it offers them the perfect Launchpad as far as Indian market is concerned.

Moreover, experts feel that increasing thrust and resultant R&D investment in progression of digital textile printing technology will further boost the growth avenues for the digital textile industry in near future. Meanwhile, increasing popularity of polyester as an alternative to cotton as a textile fabric further creates opportunities for digital textile printing equipment providers to expand their business. Attributing to such significant demand for digital textile printing technology, there is scope for manufacturers to enhance their business in time to come.

Many leading names like ColorJet India, Fortuna Colours & Prints Llp, Apsom Technologies, Kornit Digital, True Colors Group, Epson India, Jaysynth Dyestuff (India) Ltd., etc. are lined up with their new arrivals and eagerly awaiting the Show dates to launch their latest printers. Featuring continuous production and a wide range of printing capabilities, most of these new age digital textile printers work on minimal maintenance and come with easy cleaning options for smooth operation. All these activities clearly evince that overall textile printing technology market has positive growth prospects, riding on the back of the country’s burgeoning textile industry.

Companies like Arrow Digital, AT Inks, Britomatics, Cosmic Trends, DCC Print Vision Llp, E.I.DuPont India Pvt. Ltd. Electronics For Imaging India Pvt. Ltd. (Efi Optitex), Epson India, Fortuna Colours & Prints Llp, Ganpati Graphics, Grafica Flextronica, Green Printing Solution, Green Tech, Hi Tech Marketing, HP India Sales Pvt. Ltd., Jay Chemicals Industries Ltd., JN Arora & Co., Kamal Sales Corp., KNR Technology Company, Mac Printing Solutions, Mouvent, Negi Sign Systems & Supplies Co., Orange O Technology Pvt. Ltd., Somya Digital Technologies, Spintex Pvt. Ltd./Aura, Tanya Enterprises, Texzium International Pvt. Ltd./Wenli, Veekay Enterprises, & many more are coming up with their technological innovations to showcase their latest product range under the DIGITEX.
 
The extensive exhibit profile ranging from new printers and inks to upcoming techniques will explore new and exciting opportunities offered by digital printing for home furnishing & interior decoration, apparel & fashion and corporate interiors. On the display will be digital textile machinery, digital textile printing machines, dye sublimation process, screen printing machines, t-shirt printing machines, transfer printing process, digital textile printing chemicals, digital textile printing inks (disperse, reactive and pigment inks), heat transfer machines, sublimation paper, software & many more.

Moreover, it’s a great opportunity for digital printing companies, signage industry stakeholders, screen printing industry people from graphic arts industry, merchandisers and other industry players to interact with the leading digital printing technology suppliers and to witness the latest range and innovations in the sector. This is because following the advent of digital printing solution, the applications of fabric or textile is not limited only to the clothing and home furnishing, but has gone far beyond to include signage, flags, posters, back-lit, front-lit, etc. to bring forth a wholesome idea that where all digital textile printing technology can be used.

Points to be noted are numerous benefits of soft signage. Textile or soft signage presses are very eco-friendly, run over water-based inks with little to no odour and low power consumption. Soft signage facilitates customers save on shipping because of being much lighter in weight than other materials used in the signage and graphics industry. Also, fabric-printed signs fold up to create smaller packages, again decreasing shipping costs. But overall, the Show would be a win-win for business visitors as it has much more than focusing on digital printing technology, bringing entire value chain of garmenting and textile printing manufacturing solution under one roof.

Organised by the MEX Exhibitions Pvt. Ltd. in association with Messe Frankfurt India, Gartex Texprocess, this year, will have three more shows apart from the Digitex. These are namely, FABRIC & TRIMS SHOW: A focused area to source all embellishments & fabrics, DENIM SHOW: A zone that aims to bring together the denim supply chain under one roof, and INDIA LAUNDRY SHOW: An ideal platform offering a wide range of business and networking opportunities to manufacturers, suppliers and service providers in the laundry and dry-cleaning industries.

Additionally, there are a couple of focus areas i.e., EMBROIDERY ZONE highlighting the significant evolution that has been taking place in the invention of new technologies and machinery for embroidery. The top variants of embroidery machines, software & allied products will be highlighted in this dedicated segment. Another focus area is GARMENTING & APPAREL MACHINERY that would showcase technological developments in the Garment & Apparel Manufacturing Sector.

Broad exhibit categories at Gartex Texprocess 2019 include embroidery machines, cutting and sewing machines, fabrics & accessories, needles & threads, laundry & washing equipment, finishing equipment, laser cutting machines, digital textile printing machines, automation and software.

Source:

MEX Exhibitions Pvt. Ltd. / Messe Frankfurt

Photo by pexels.com
11.06.2019

From PET Bottles to Textile Recycling: Where Does the Sports Industry Stand?

  • Recycling: The System in the Sports and Outdoor Industry needs Solutions

Old PET bottles are nowadays used to make polyester clothing, and there are also sports jerseys, outdoor jackets, shirts, trousers and bikinis made of plastic waste. But can textiles and shoes also be recycled? The good news is that some solutions have already been found. However, textiles and shoes can only be recycled with a massive reduction in quality.
 
Recycling of Shoes Possible Since 2018
The world's first industrial recycling plant for all types of footwear has been in operation in Germany since June 2018. It was established by Soex Recycling Germany GmbH from Bitterfeld, which in cooperation with European companies has developed a shoe recycling plant within five years.

More information:
Recycling recycling fibers
Source:

Messe München GmbH

(c) Messe Frankfurt Exhibition GmbH
09.04.2019

Clothing Production in the Future

Individualisation, automation and digitalisation: micro-factories are the way forward for the future of clothing production and will be the main theme of Texprocess in Frankfurt am Main from 14 to 17 May 2019.

“Send your favourite design to the manufacturer today via an app and wear your individually designed, perfectly fitting trainers or shirt tomorrow.
It’s a long time since this was just a pipe dream for the future,” says Michael Jänecke, Director Brand Management Technical Textiles and Textile Processing at Messe Frankfurt. “Behind it, however, lies a host of complex processes, involving production, processing and logistics. Micro-factories, based on networked and integrated procedures, represent the progressive way of making textile processing quicker, more flexible and, because it is more local, also more sustainable; whilst, at the same time, producing personalised products.”

Individualisation, automation and digitalisation: micro-factories are the way forward for the future of clothing production and will be the main theme of Texprocess in Frankfurt am Main from 14 to 17 May 2019.

“Send your favourite design to the manufacturer today via an app and wear your individually designed, perfectly fitting trainers or shirt tomorrow.
It’s a long time since this was just a pipe dream for the future,” says Michael Jänecke, Director Brand Management Technical Textiles and Textile Processing at Messe Frankfurt. “Behind it, however, lies a host of complex processes, involving production, processing and logistics. Micro-factories, based on networked and integrated procedures, represent the progressive way of making textile processing quicker, more flexible and, because it is more local, also more sustainable; whilst, at the same time, producing personalised products.”

In a total of four micro-factories at the up-coming Texprocess, trade visitors will be able to get an idea of how integrated textile processing works and where micro-factories are already being used.


Digital Textile Micro-Factory: on-demand and virtual reality
Following the success of the last event, Texprocess, in collaboration with the German Institutes of Textile and Fibre Research in Denkendorf (Institute für Textil- und Faserforschung Denkendorf – DITF) and partners from industry, will once again be presenting a ‘Digital Textile Micro-Factory’ display - and thus fully networked production chains - live in Hall 4.1. New this year: the ‘Digital Textile Micro-Factory’ will showcase three production lines – one for apparel manufacture, one for 3D-knitted shoes and one for processing technical textiles, largely for the motor-vehicle and furniture industries.

‘Fashion Line’ integrates virtual prototypes and customer interaction
The fashion industry plays a central role in the ‘Digital Textile MicroFactory’. The customer’s digital doppelganger is becoming more and more important in development departments in the apparel industry as the starting point for individualised and perfectly fitting clothes and for links with finishing departments. In the context of the micro-factory’s production line, it is the key feature.

The production line demonstrates the various stages involved, including CAD/Design, printing, cutting out, assembly, finishing and labelling. New approaches also combine 3D simulations of clothing with direct data transfer in virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR). Instead of presenting the customer with physical examples of the clothing to be produced, the examples are visualised as virtual objects. And during the production process, the customer has the opportunity for direct input into the design of the product in question. This direct interaction between the 3D simulation of an item, the representation in VR/AR displayed on the customer’s own hardware and the direct impact on the production process has never been shown before in this way. Partners of the ‘Fashion Line’ are: Assyst (CAD/design), Mitwill (materials), Caddon, ErgoSoft, Mimaki and Multiplot (printing), Zünd (cutting), Juki and Stoll (assembling), Veit (finishing) and Vuframe (AR/VR).

3D knitting on the way to Industry 4.0
From 3D image to finished prototype in 18 minutes: the future is here in the world of knitting too! The ‘Digital Textile Micro-Factory’ at Texprocess and Techtextil shows a workflow which enables 3D-knitted uppers for shoes to be produced directly from the customer’s own particular foot measurements.
The ‘3D-knitting Line’ of the micro-factory demonstrates the process from the 3D model to the creation of a geometrically accurate knitting pattern by the software, based on the 3D data set, and the development of a specification of the final knitting data, through to the manufacture of a 3D-knitted prototype. Knitting is the additive manufacturing process for textiles. The ‘3D-knitting Line’ is partnered by Stoll.

Processing technical textiles in the micro-factory
Industry 4.0 live: the focus of the third production line of the ‘Digital Textile Micro-Factory’ 2019 is on the automated processing of technical textiles, personalised for the individual customer, taking us right through to the finished product. Trade visitors will see here on-demand inkjet printing and networked machines with integrated sensors, which are linked through a bus system – a future-oriented topic for integrated manufacturing. A robot arm with a special claw for use with textiles sorts the cut items as they emerge from the cutter in a free-moving open shuttle. The items to be sewn are conveyed automatically to the sewing stations. Tracing and tracking procedures show the progress of each order through the individual stages of the manufacturing process using an auto ID. In addition, the display will also show how creative ideas from the Cloud can be incorporated in the manufacture of technical products. Technology meets creativity. Partners of the production line: Mitwill (design), ErgoSoft (RIP), Caddon (colour management), HP (large-format inkjet printing), Zünd (cutting), Dürkopp Adler (networking, integration of an open shuttle, sewing), Veit (finishing), Next Robotics (material handling).

Smart Textiles Micro-Factory: industrial-type production of smart textiles
In their ‘Smart Textiles Micro-Factory’, located in the walkway between Halls 4.1 and 5.1, the Institute for Textile Technology (ITA) at the RWTH Aachen University, together with partners from industry and research, will be producing a ‘smart’ pillow which, with the help of integrated LEDs, provides new ways of interaction. With this demonstration, the partners in the project will present an exemplary, industrial-style manufacturing process for a smart textile from design to finished product. The prototype of the pillow was displayed in advance at Heimtextil 2019. The following are all involved in the ‘Smart Textiles Micro-Factory’: the Institute for Textile Technology (ITA) of the RWTH Aachen University (project coordination), Gerber Technology GmbH (cutting), the Korea Institute for Industrial Technology KITECH (electronics), VETRON TYPICAL Europe GmbH (sewing), Wear it GmbH (product design and concept) and ZSK Stickmaschinen GmbH (embroidery).
 
World of Digital Fashion: customisation of apparel
Six companies have grouped together under the ‘World of Digital Fashion’ umbrella. They work in areas of visualisation, CAD-cutting systems, automated body measurement, cutting out and process automation. Together, they will be showcasing, in Hall 4.0, ways of integrating and combining their products in a variety of workflows within the value creation chain and will enable visitors to experience what the digital process chain is like in practice. The focus will fall particularly on the customisation of apparel and fashion items. Partners of the ‘World of Digital Fashion’ are: Browzwear Solutions and Tronog (visualisation), Software Dr. K. Friedrich (CAD), Fision (automated body measurement), Bullmer (cutting), as well as Gertsch Consulting and Mode Vision (process automation).

Micro-factory presented by Efka and Gemini: easy to implement
Manufacturers of drive mechanisms for industrial sewing machines Efka will,in collaboration with CAD suppliers Gemini, be showcasing the production of a knitted garment that can be individually designed. The core element of their micro-factory, which closely reflects industrial practice, is the link to the sewing stage of production, something which is already available today as an economic, partially automated solution. The display presents a solution that can be easily implemented and adopted by most companies, using already available resources.

 

More information:
Texprocess
Source:

Messe Frankfurt Exhibtion GmbH

Foto: PIXABAY
19.02.2019

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC REMAINS DIFFICULT MARKET FOR GERMAN TEXTILE MACHINERY

  • Deliveries have risen sharply recently

Cheap and used technology dominates at the Dominican market for textile machinery. It is some of the country's problems that give German suppliers some hope.

The good news is that in the first eleven months of 2018 German exports of textile and clothing machinery to the Dominican Republic rose by 580 percent year-on-year, and, according to Eurostat, by 2017 German deliveries had tripled. The bad news: German sector exports reached only EUR 1.7 million in absolute terms. This is considerably less than, for example, in Guatemala with its not much larger technology market.

  • Deliveries have risen sharply recently

Cheap and used technology dominates at the Dominican market for textile machinery. It is some of the country's problems that give German suppliers some hope.

The good news is that in the first eleven months of 2018 German exports of textile and clothing machinery to the Dominican Republic rose by 580 percent year-on-year, and, according to Eurostat, by 2017 German deliveries had tripled. The bad news: German sector exports reached only EUR 1.7 million in absolute terms. This is considerably less than, for example, in Guatemala with its not much larger technology market.

Representatives of German providers are not surprised about the figures. Cheap equipment from China and other Asian countries are in demand, but above all mainly used machines. Hugo Clavijo of Texquim, who represents the German suppliers Mayer & Cie. (circular knitting machines) and Groz-Beckert (needles), among others in the Dominican Republic, estimates, that just five out of every hundred machines sold are new. Around the turn of the millennium, the market thus became the residual ramp for the declining US textile industry. According to UN Comtrade, around 60 percent of the value of technology deliveries in recent years came from the USA.

The International Textile Manufacturers Federation also registered hardly any shipments of new machines: for 2010 to 2017, the ITMF shows just ten flat knitting machines and eleven (all in 2017) circular knitting machines. Also, for this period 720 Double Heaters for texturing synthetic filaments for yarn production were listed. The ITMF counts the deliveries of 200 textile machinery manufacturers worldwide and thus a large part of the market, albeit not the entire one.

Electricity and water bottlenecks as arguments for expensive machines
Hugo Clavijo currently sees no great chance of a rapid improvement in the sale of expensive German technology. But ironically, it is some of the country's problems that may transform the potential customer interest into concrete procurements: The energy supply for the textile companies is expensive and unreliable, and the companies have to treat their process water themselves. Economical and less repair-prone machines would come into a closer consideration even if the purchase prices were significantly higher. It would also be helpful to enforce environmental standards, which today are largely on paper only.

There is also a need for technology if the Dominican textile and clothing manufacturers expand their capacities due to possible changes in international trade policy, i.e. if clothing customers in the USA would place orders in the Caribbean country instead of Asia. At the moment, however, the Dominican export industry is not using its factories to capacity.

Installed capacity of the Dominican textile industry in comparison (2016, in units) 1)

Machinery / technology Dominican Republic Guatemala Ethiopia Turkey
Rotor Spinning 2) 1,400 21,000 19,000 800,000
Short Staple Spinning 2) 20,000 150,000 293,852 7,900,000
Shuttle Looms 3) 500 3,000 167 20,000
Shuttleless Looms 3) 150 890 2,200 49,500

1) no data on other machines; 2) spinning machines; 3) weaving machines

Source: International Textile Manufacturers Federation

The Dominican textile and clothing industry, which, according to the central bank, generated 11 percent of the country's total export revenues with clothing from free zones in 2017, is not fully vertically integrated: it mainly imports yarns, which then is mainly being knitted but also woven or otherwise processed and then assembled into finished clothing. It often produces T-shirts and other knitwear with a high cotton content. And this is "the cheap stuff," as Clavijo says.

There is a limited production of synthetic yarn in the Dominican Republic which, according to Hugo Clavijo, is limited to two companies: The Korean company Youm Kwang textures filaments in the country, while the US company A&E (American & Efird) produces sewing thread from imported filaments.

Four export producers as important technology customers
The Dominican textile sector is said to consist of about two equal segments. A dozen medium-sized companies and a large number of garage companies supply the domestic market. In addition, four companies produce for export in the country's free zones: Gildan (Canada), Hanes (USA), Willbes (Korea) and the local Grupo M, which has been working in a 50/50 joint venture with Brandix from Sri Lanka since the beginning of 2017. The procurement of machines in foreign companies is not decided by the local management, but by the corporate headquarters, according to representatives.

The four export producers are said to be vertically integrated from yarn processing onwards. Grupo M supplies about one fifth of its fabrics, knitwear, etc. to processors, while the other three industry giants manufacture these preliminary products completely by themselves. According to Comtrade (SITC chapter 84), three quarters of the clothing exports go to the USA, the remainder predominantly to the neighboring Haiti.

For US clothing customers, the nearby Dominican Republic offers fast and cheap transport routes as well as the advantageous customs regime of the DR-CAFTA trade agreement. According to Hugo Clavijo, however, Dominican clothing exporters must obtain their intermediate products from the USA in order to benefit from all customs relief. Producers for the Dominican domestic market, on the other hand, are using yarns and fabrics from China, Pakistan or other third countries that offer lower production costs.

USA dominate machine deliveries
The Dominican market for textile and clothing machinery has stagnated in recent years: For 2017, UN Comtrade estimated imports - there is no significant domestic production - at USD 36 million. That was as much as 2014 and around USD 10 million more than around 2010.

According to Comtrade, Germany was ranked sixth in the import ranking with an average share of 2.0 percent between 2015 and 2017. Eurostat, whose (export) data deviate considerably in some cases, noted stagnating industry deliveries from the European Union to the Dominican Republic for the first eleven months of 2018 in addition to the high growth for Made in Germany.

Dominican imports of textile machinery (USD thousand *)
ITC-Pos. Supplying country/ Goods Group 2015 2016 2017
  total 33,398 30,817 36,257
724.35, .39 Sewing machines (excluding domestic sewing machines) 12,131 10,350 12,784
7244 Spinn- and texturing machines 2,852 2,102 4,585
7245 Knitting and weaving machines 3,362 2,683 1,543
7246 Auxiliary machines 6,068 5,215 5,384
724.73, .74 Washing machines, stenter frames, etc. (except for housholds and landries), large-dryers 5,135 5,615 7,652
724.92 Parts for items 724.73 and .74 and for dry-cleaning machines (724.72) and domestic tumble dryers 3,850 4,852 4,309
  Supplying countries      
  USA 22,000 17,320 20,743
  China 3,424 3,058 2,380
  Spain 2,176 2,567 2,614
  Japan 973 1,894 2,688
  Italy 923 1,194 496
  Germany 397 724 873

*) SITC 724 without household sewing machines (724,33), household washing machines (724,.71), machines for dry cleaning (724.72), leather processing (7248), parts of household washing machines (724.91).
Source: UN Comtrade.

 

More information:
GTAI
Source:

Ulrich Binkert, Germany Trade & Invest www.gtai.de

Photo: Pixabay
15.01.2019

TURKISH APPAREL MANUFACTURERS ANNOUNCE INVESTMENTS

  • Capacity expansion planned by 20 percent

Istanbul (GTAI) - Several major apparel manufacturers plan to significantly expand their production capacities in 2019. The modernization of the factories is on the agenda as well.

Turkey's export-oriented clothing industry scores at European customers with good quality and above all with short delivery times. Recently, they have significantly increased their orders, according to industry sources.

The good order situation is prompting Turkish clothing manufacturers to investments. The 28 larger companies plan to spend around 100 million US dollars in 2019 to expand their capacities. This is the result of a study conducted by the Turkish business magazine Ekonomist (December 9, 2018 issue) in cooperation with the Garment Industry Association TGSD.

  • Capacity expansion planned by 20 percent

Istanbul (GTAI) - Several major apparel manufacturers plan to significantly expand their production capacities in 2019. The modernization of the factories is on the agenda as well.

Turkey's export-oriented clothing industry scores at European customers with good quality and above all with short delivery times. Recently, they have significantly increased their orders, according to industry sources.

The good order situation is prompting Turkish clothing manufacturers to investments. The 28 larger companies plan to spend around 100 million US dollars in 2019 to expand their capacities. This is the result of a study conducted by the Turkish business magazine Ekonomist (December 9, 2018 issue) in cooperation with the Garment Industry Association TGSD.

On average, the companies aimed to increase their capacity by around 20 percent in 2019, the report says. They expected their sales to increase by 15 to 35 percent.

The clothing manufacturer Taha Giyim (http://www.tahagiyim.com), supplier of LC Waikiki, plans to expand its production in the Malatya organized industrial zone. The company plans to invest a total of Turkish Lira 32.2 million (TL; about USD 6.7 million; USD 1 = 4.81 TL) in this project this year and increase its annual shirt production capacity to 2 million pieces. The company is aiming for its sales growth of 40 percent in 2019. In 2018, the estimated revenue was about T.L. 2.5 billion or about USD 520 million.

Higher production of men's outerwear
The company TYH Tekstil (http://www.tyh.com.tr), which manufactures men's outerwear in six plants, plans to expand its production capacity by 15 percent from the current 20 million units per year in 2019. Investments of TL 15 million TL are planned in Akhisar/Manisa (Western Turkey) and Ordu (Black Sea region). The company exports most of its products to the European Union. The aim is to increase deliveries to the USA. The estimated turnover of around USD 140 million in 2018 is expected to increase by 15 percent in 2019.

The manufacturer Yesim Tekstil (http://www.yesim.com), which sews for large textile companies such as Inditex, Esprit and Tommy Hilfiger, plans to double its turnover from around US$ 300 million (2018) to US$ 600 million by 2022. The technological infrastructure (industry 4.0, digitization, cloud computing) is to be expanded. The investment budget for the next five years for the procurement of machinery, plant, software and licenses totals USD 14.4 million.

Denim article manufacturer expands capacities
The manufacturer of denim articles, Calik Denim (http://www.calikdenim.com), plans to increase its production capacity by 30 percent in 2019 with a further USD 8.4 million and to push forward with the modernization of its manufacturing processes. Last year, the company stated that it had invested a total of USD 44.7 million. Calik Denim's goal is to increase its current annual capacity from 44 million meters to 60 million meters by 2020. For 2019, the company is targeting sales growth of 22 percent (2018: USD 189 million).

The company Migiboy Tekstil (http://www.migiboy.com) plans to build a fourth plant for TL 100 million in which previously imported textile raw materials should be produced. The company's goal is to triple its turnover of around TL 300 million (2018) over the next five years.

Sector network of Turkish companies abroad grows
The increasing internationalization of the clothing business is also contributing to the export success. Turkish textile trading companies have opened more than 2,000 branches abroad in recent years. The Koton company alone is growing by 30 percent annually. In 2017, the company ordered goods worth TL 1.8 billion from Turkey for its foreign business. In the foreseeable future, Koton intends to increase its procurement share from Turkey from the current 85 percent to 90 percent. Koton has 516 branches in 29 countries and employs about 10,500 people.

Hadi Karasu, President of the Industry Association (TGSD), sees potential in the German market in particular that has not yet been fully exploited. So far almost one fifth of Turkish clothing exports go to Germany. Karasu believes a share of 25 percent as possible.

In 2018, the apparel industry increased its exports by 3.6 percent to USD 17.6 billion. For 2019, the association TGSD expects an increase of 10 percent. Production is expected to increase by 3 to 4 percent.
Further information to economic situation, sectors, business practice, right, customs and advertisements in Turkey are callable under http://www.gtai.de/tuerkei

 

Indien fördert die Textilverarbeitung Photo: Pixabay
23.10.2018

INDIA PROMOTES TEXTILE PROCESSING

  • Integrated industrial parks necessary

New Delhi (GTAI) – The Indian textile sector is not only important for bringing foreign currency into the country, but also because of its role as an employer. The formation of new clusters is now getting supported by the government.

India, as one of the leading global producers not only of cotton, but also of wool, jute and silk, has a historic tradition in converting raw materials. Accordingly, India’s industry concerning spinning and weaving of fabric is broadly positioned, while contributing 14% of India's gross domestic product.

  • Integrated industrial parks necessary

New Delhi (GTAI) – The Indian textile sector is not only important for bringing foreign currency into the country, but also because of its role as an employer. The formation of new clusters is now getting supported by the government.

India, as one of the leading global producers not only of cotton, but also of wool, jute and silk, has a historic tradition in converting raw materials. Accordingly, India’s industry concerning spinning and weaving of fabric is broadly positioned, while contributing 14% of India's gross domestic product.

Even though the sector mostly consists of small enterprises, some clusters emerged. The textile industry can mainly be found in the federal states of Gujarat, West Bengal, Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nudo.     
A more detailed structure is drawn by Sanjay K Jain, chairman of the textile Association “Confederation of Indian Textile Industry in an interview with Germany Trade & Invest: Knitwear clusters are found in Tirupur, Tamil Nadu, Kolkata, West Bengal, Ludhiana, and Kanpur. There are weaving centers in Ichankaranji and Bhiwandi (both Maharashtra), Erode (Tamil Nadu), Surat (Gujarat), and Bhilwara (Rajasthan). For ready-to-wear a cluster in Panipat (Haryana) and for the production of shirts and trousers has formed a cluster in Bangalore (Karnataka).
 
The state subsidy agency India Brand Equity Foundation (IBEF) recognizes four industrial centers – also according to the regional availability of raw materials. In the north (Kashmir, Ludhiana and Panipat) about 80 percent the production of woolen goods are concentrated. In the west (Ahmedabad, Mumbai, Surat, Raijkot, Indore and Vadodara) is the focus of the cotton industry. Hosiery (Tirupur, Coimbatore and Madurai) and silk products (Bengaluru, Mysore and Chennai) have their strengths in the South. The east of the country is focused on jute goods (Bihar and West Bengal). But also wool (Uttar Pradesh) and cotton goods (West Bengal) are represented. In addition, ac-cording to the IBEF, India has seven export-oriented Special Economic Zones for Textiles and Clothing in mid-2018.

A handicap for the textile industry is the missing size. For example, most low-capacity sites are scattered across the country. The construction of large integrated industrial parks is necessary. The various states and state institutions are also trying to promote new textile clusters.

The central government budget will provide ap-proximately US $ 4 million for the Scheme for Integrated Textile Parks (SITP) program in the fiscal year 2018/19 (April 1 to March 31). There are currently 47 projects in this field. The pro-gram intends the further development of such settlements with a common infrastructure.

More information:
Indien
Source:

Rainer Jaensch, Germany Trade & Invest www.gtai.de

ETHOPIA CAN SET UP FURTHER TEXTILE FACTORIES Photo: Pixabay
15.05.2018

ETHOPIA CAN SET UP FURTHER TEXTILE FACTORIES

  • Sudanese and Chinese investors want to secure raw material supplies

Nairobi (GTAI) - Ethiopia has further successes in attracting textile companies: One British company is planning to invest USD 100 million, one Chinese company even plans to invest USD 220 million. This means that the textile sector is increasingly becoming a self-starter, as donors increasingly want to supply domestic industry with pre-products. Meanwhile, those who invest should not only raise the financial means, but also the raw material cotton, according to market experts.

  • Sudanese and Chinese investors want to secure raw material supplies

Nairobi (GTAI) - Ethiopia has further successes in attracting textile companies: One British company is planning to invest USD 100 million, one Chinese company even plans to invest USD 220 million. This means that the textile sector is increasingly becoming a self-starter, as donors increasingly want to supply domestic industry with pre-products. Meanwhile, those who invest should not only raise the financial means, but also the raw material cotton, according to market experts.

The Ethiopian textile and clothing market has two new entrants: the British Intrade Co. UK Ltd. and the Chinese Wuxi No. 1 Cotton Investment Co. Ltd, Intrade intends to build a textile and clothing factory in the Mekelle Industrial Park (Tigray Regional State), which was opened in July 2017. Initial cost estimates are around USD 100 million. Intrade is an offshore company of the Sudanese Mahgoub-Sons Group. The company has reached an agreement with the Ethiopian Investment Commission to invest USD 200 million in three projects. The textile project is to be completed in 16 months.

Security of supply for cotton is becoming an issue
The Sudanese group is not only interested in textile production, but also with lucrative supply transactions for its own cotton. They have the capacity to supply 500,000 tons of long staple quality cotton annually, Wagdi Mirghani Mahgoub, Managing Director of Intrade says. The supply of raw cotton has become an increasing problem for the emerging Ethiopian textile industry since some Asian countries ordered export stops for the raw material, including the PR China and India. The African Plantation, which cultivates 33,000 hectares of agricultural land in Sudan, also belongs to the Mahgoub-Sons Group.

However, Wuxi No. 1 Cotton Investment has announced the second and larger textile investment of 2018: a textile factory will be opened shortly in the Dire Dawa Industrial Park. In a first phase, USD 80 million are planned, followed by further investments totaling USD 140 million. The company intends to install state-of-the-art textile machines to produce and supply goods for the demanding markets in Europe, Japan, South Korea and Southeast Asia. According to their own statements, partners are leading world machinery brands. Wuxi is already pursuing a project in the Ethiopian city of Adama and also has plans to grow cotton in Ethiopia.

Ethiopia is considered the first textile address in Africa
"Clothing companies are nomads," an industry consultant knows, "they go where it is cheapest for them. If wages and ancillary costs rise too much in countries like Bangladesh or the PR China, the caravan moves on." South of the Sahara, only Mauritius has made a name for itself as a producer of high-quality clothing. Attempts to establish larger-scale textile and clothing companies in Namibia and Lesotho have so far been unsuccessful. Meanwhile, Kenya and Ghana have production conditions that are far too expensive.

Ethiopia offers several advantages at the same time: Wages and ancillary costs are extremely low and far below those in China. The US Centre for Global Development found out that a worker in Ethiopian sweatshops earns an average of USD 909 a year. In Bangladesh, however, it is US$ 835 and in Tanzania and Kenya even US$ 1,776 and US$ 2,118 respectively. Another advantage: Ethiopian seamstresses are considered to be extremely hardworking and reliable. In addition, there is a tradition in textile and clothing production as well as in leather processing and thus there is a basic pool of trained specialists.

Infrastructure is making huge progress
Meanwhile, the supply of domestic cotton and leather needs to be expanded, because in the drought years 2016 and partly 2017 the supply of cotton was insufficient. The government is cooperating and is increasingly listening to the needs of producers. The infrastructure is currently undergoing sustained improvement, in particular the transport routes to the neighboring seaport of Djibouti, from where Europe can be reached more quickly than from the Far East. And, last but not least, the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa has a capable air traffic hub with a dozen direct flights to the EU, including Frankfurt and Vienna. In addition, there is a modern air freight center.

Just as important as the delivery routes are the comparatively modern production conditions in the newly emerging industrial centers throughout the country. Everything here is "Made in China": fences, access controls, roads, electricity and water supply, waste and sewage disposal, workers' settlements. From a European perspective, this may look like Chinese dominance, but from an Ethiopian perspective it creates jobs, feeds families and earns foreign exchange. Under better working conditions than in Bangladesh, experts mean.

According to the ideas of the Ethiopian government, the country is undergoing a transformation process: away from an agrarian-based economy and towards an industrial state. By 2025, the country is expected to reach middle-income status and to become Africa's largest industrial production hub. To achieve this, Ethiopia is investing heavily in roads, railways and power generation, health and education, urban and rural development and the creation of industrial clusters.

Customs advantages in the USA and Europe
Ethiopia has so far benefited from the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) of the USA, which, for example, allows savings of 16.8 percent in import duties on cotton trousers and 30 percent on synthetic shirts. Ethiopia also has duty-free access to the EU market under the Everything but Arms initiative. Fears that US President Donald Trump might stop AGOA have not yet come true.

Ethiopian exports of textiles, clothing and leather products
(including footwear; in US$ millions)

SITC-Commodity Group
 2014 2015 2016
61 Leather and leather goods    97.51    98.20
78.63  
65 Yarn, fabrics, finished textile products and related articles  39.34  39.12 29.61
84 Clothing and apparel accessories  55.53  77.94  68.25
85 Shoes         
 33.88
 37.69  43.80
Total 226,26 252,95  220,2

Source: Comtrade

German exports can be expanded
German sales representatives of technology for the textile, clothing and leather industry are not yet well positioned in Ethiopia. According to preliminary figures from the Federal Statistical Office (SITC 724), only EUR 2.84 million of relevant technology where sent to Ethiopia in 2017, though 169 percent more than in the previous year.

Ethiopian imports of machinery, equipment and parts for the textile and leather industries
(SITC 724; in USD millions)

Supplying Country 2014    2015 2016
Total 131.30 170.51 111.10
.. PR China  43.87  42.40 62.07
..Italy 6.38 11.75 11.72
..Japan 4.40 10.11 6.89
..Turkey   4.86 19.14 4.92
..Other Asian countries, not specified 1.85 1.87 4.11
..India  6.07 6.49 3.06
..Germany 9.22 9.08 2.44

Source: Comtrade

 

Source:

Martin Böll, Nairobi (GTAI)

12.12.2017

ETHIOPIA FOCUSES ON CLOTHING AND TEXTILE EXPORTS

  • Industrial parks should enable a quantum leap
  • Progress in infrastructure, Deficits in foreign exchange provision

The Ethiopian textile, clothing and leather industry scores not only with comparatively low wages and high-performing personnel, but also with modern industrial parks. In the meantime the technology has to be fully imported and the supply of materials needs to be greatly expanded. There is a great progress in logistics, but unfortunately not in foreign exchange procurement. German suppliers of relevant equipment should definitely consider Ethiopia in their acquisition.

  • Industrial parks should enable a quantum leap
  • Progress in infrastructure, Deficits in foreign exchange provision

The Ethiopian textile, clothing and leather industry scores not only with comparatively low wages and high-performing personnel, but also with modern industrial parks. In the meantime the technology has to be fully imported and the supply of materials needs to be greatly expanded. There is a great progress in logistics, but unfortunately not in foreign exchange procurement. German suppliers of relevant equipment should definitely consider Ethiopia in their acquisition.

So far, only Mauritius has made a name for itself as a producer of high-quality clothing south of the Sahara. Attempts to locate textile and clothing companies in Namibia and Lesotho in a larger style have not been very successful. Meanwhile Kenya and Ghana have far too expensive production conditions. "Clothing companies are nomadic,” says a consultant, who is specializing in the trade, "they go where it's cheapest for them."

Meanwhile, Ethiopia offers several advantages: Wages and additional costs are far below the Chinese ones. A worker in the Ethiopian factories earns an average of USD 909 a year, according to a survey by the US Center for Global Development, compared to USD 835 in Bangladesh, USD 1,776 in Tanzania, and USD 2,118 in Kenya. Another advantage is appreciated by employees: Ethiopia has a long tradition of textile and clothing production as well as in leather processing and thus at least an expandable base of skilled workers.

The supply of native cotton and leather meanwhile is considered strongly expandable. In times of drought, such as in 2016 and partly in 2017, the supply of cotton is insufficient. However, the government is cooperative and increasingly open to the needs of producers. Thus, the infrastructure has been currently sustainably improved, in particular the transport routes to the seaport Djibouti, from where Europe is much faster to reach than from the Far East. In addition, the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa has a capable aviation hub with a dozen direct flights to the EU, including Frankfurt and Vienna. There is also a modern air freight center.

Modern industrial parks as a game changer

Just as important as the delivery routes are the "modern" production conditions in the emerging industrial centers all over the country, Made by China: pothole-free roads, guaranteed electricity and water supply, proper waste and wastewater disposal, workers' settlements in the vicinity. From the Ethiopian point of view, a great many jobs are created, families are fed and foreign exchange is earned.

According to its government, Ethiopia is in a transformation process away from an agrarian economy and towards an industrialized state. By 2025, the country should reach a "middle-income status" and become the largest industrial production hub in Africa. To achieve this, Ethiopia is investing heavily in roads, railways and power generation, in health and education, in urban and rural development, and in the creation of industrial clusters.

Ambitious export specifications

In July 2016 the Hawassa Industrial Park was officially opened, dedicated to the export of textiles and clothing, and is the largest industrial park in sub-Saharan Africa. As early as 2018, the park is expected to employ 60,000 workers and generate USD 1 billion in exports of clothing and textiles - a steep target given in a view of the current export figures. As early as 2030, Ethiopia wants to reach a total of USD 30 billion by exporting textiles and clothing - but it's still a long way off. At present, 15 in-ternational companies are already investing in Hawassa, including the US PVH Corporation (formerly Phillips-Van Heusen Corporation, prominent brands: Calvin Klein and Tommy Hilfinger) and Epic Group (Hong Kong), a supplier of, among others, Walmart , JC Penny, Levi Strauss, VF Corporation, Tesco, Sansbury's, Marks & Spencer and C & A. Epic wanted to go to Kenya first, but then decided for Ethiopia at the last minute, which, according to Epic boss Ranjan Mahtani, is "still unpolished," but has the most potential.

The challenges are considered to be high: "Our seam-stresses have never got a job before and have never seen a sewing machine," Mahtani says training therefore is a top priority. At the same time, however, his company also relies on state-of-the-art automatic machines, for example for attaching bags. The production halls are also all around computerized with RFID technology. The current efficiency Mahtani estimates at 25 to 30 percent. After experience with other production sites, results of 75 to 80 percent are possible after about ten years.

Wide range of new industrial parks under construction

In July 2017, another industrial park was opened in Kombolcha City. A whole range of other parks are in various stages of realization and all are focused on the apparel, textile, pharmaceutical and medical device manufacturing sectors. According to the Ethiopian Government, there is no shortage of interested investors from the PR of China, India, Turkey, the US, Hong Kong and South Korea. Ethiopia benefits from the African Growth and Opportunity Act of the United States, which, for example, reduces its import duties by 16.8 per cent on cotton pants and 30 per cent on synthetic shirts. In addition, Ethiopia has a duty-free access to the EU market under the Everything-but-Arms initiative.

Ethiopian exports of textiles, clothing and leather goods (including shoes), in USD mio
SITC- product group 2014 2015 2016
61 Leather and leather goods  97.51 98.20 78.63
65 Yarn, fabrics finished textiles and re-lated products 39.34 39.12 29.61
84 Clothing and clothing accessories 55.53 77.94 68.25
85 Shoes   33.88 37.69 43.80
Total      226.26 252.95 220.29

Source: Comtrade, as of 18 October 2017

Ethiopian imports of machinery and equipment for the textile and leather industry and parts thereof (SITC 724, in USD mio, change in%)
Supplying country 2014 2015 2016
Total      131.30

170.51

111.10
PR China 43.87 42.40 62.07
Italy 6.38 11.75 11.72
Japan 4.40 10.11 6.89
Turkey 4.86 19.14 4.92
other Asian countries, not specified 1.85 1.87 4.11
India 6.07 6.49 3.06
Germany 9.22 9.08 2.44

Note: The import figures mentioned above are based on Ethiopian data, which for various reasons are not considered particularly reliable. Equally not reliable are often the relevant export data of the partner countries, because all sea transports go via Djibouti and deliveries statistically are recorded often as exports to Djibouti.
Source: UN Comtrade, as of 18 October 2017

German exports expandable

German exporters of technology for the textile, clothing and leather industries are not yet well positioned in Ethiopia. According to the preliminary figures of the Federal Statistical Office (SITCM 724), in 2016 only EUR 1.06 mio of relevant technology went to Ethiopia, compared to EUR 1.05 mio in the previous year and EUR 5.02 mio in 2015.

More information:
Ethiopia Export Textilindustrie
Source:

Martin Böll, Nairobi (GTAI)

05.12.2017

TURKISH CLOTHING MANUFACTURERS RELY ON DESIGN AND OWN BRANDS

  • Companies want stay away from cheap contract manufacturing

Istanbul (GTAI) - The highly export-oriented Turkish textile and clothing industry wants to increase its competitiveness on world markets by investing in design. The hitherto widespread contract manufacturing for foreign brand manufacturers is losing importance in favor of own collections. With a law from 2016, the Turkish state explicitly promotes investment in design.

  • Companies want stay away from cheap contract manufacturing

Istanbul (GTAI) - The highly export-oriented Turkish textile and clothing industry wants to increase its competitiveness on world markets by investing in design. The hitherto widespread contract manufacturing for foreign brand manufacturers is losing importance in favor of own collections. With a law from 2016, the Turkish state explicitly promotes investment in design.

The Turkish textile and clothing industry is going through a structural change: While the garment industry was once particularly interesting because of the comparatively low labor costs for contract manufacturing orders from Western companies, Turkish manufacturers are increasingly working as designers for international clients. In addition to well-known Turkish fashion manufacturers such as Ipekyol, Vakko and Zorluteks, more and more Turkish textile companies are also manufacturing and marketing their own brands. In parallel, they are expanding their online sales network. For example, Ipekyol intends to close half of its stores in the next 20 years.

In order to meet the changing demand of foreign cooperation partners, Turkish clothing companies are increasingly investing in research and development projects, as the Turkish business magazine Ekonomist reports.

For example, Hassan Tekstil (http://www.hassan.com.tr) based in Istanbul, founded in 2017, has a 45-member R & D department. The company, whose revenues of USD 232 mio in 2016 were generated 35 percent from exports, plans to spend1.5 percent of its revenue on R & D activities.    

Another company that is increasingly investing in R & D and design is TYH Tekstil (http://www.tyh.com.tr) in Istanbul. This purely export-oriented company with a turnover of around USD 100 mio (2016) employs 15 fashion experts. About 1.5 to 2 percent of sales, which will reach around USD 130 mio in 2017, will be used for design projects and the development of collections, according to the Economist's report. In addition to contract manufacturing for well-known international brands such as Gant and COS, TYH Tekstil also developed its own brand Roqa for women's outerwear. Meanwhile, 20 to 25 percent of exports are from the supply of private label products.

Innovative workwear for security forces

According to Economist, another manufacturer with increasing R & D activities is Narkonteks (http://www.narkonteks.com) in Izmir. This company, which does not produces for international companies only, produces also goods under its own brand "Blackspade". Narkonteks also supplies customers in the Netherlands with technical textiles for security personnel. The manufacturer employs 30 engineers for its R & D activities. Of the targeted sales of TL 100 mio in 2017, 1.5 percent will be spent on R & D activities.

In 2016 Narkonteks generated around TL 80 mio. (1 Euro = 4.50 TL). The company Farb Textile (http://www.farbetextile.com) in Izmir, which sews for European fashion companies such as Bestseller, Inditex and Mango, emphasizes increased design activities also, according to Economist. About 60 percent of the production are own brands. The turnover of TL 100 mio (2016), should be increased to TL 130 mio.
 
One of the larger R & D investors is the clothing manufacturer Taypa Tekstil in Istanbul (http://www.taypa.com.tr) with a turnover of EUR 100 million, which exports about 80 percent of its production. The parent company TAy Group, which supplies large fashion houses such as Levis, Inditex and Tommy Hilfiger, uses 5 percent of its revenue for research and innovation projects and employs 25 designers, writes the magazine Ekonomist. The share of own brands in sales of currently 21 percent is to be increased to 50 percent in the foreseeable future.

Taypa invests in major project in Algeria

In addition to the existing production in Egypt Taypa Tekstil manufactures in Serbia and Algeria. In a clothing factory in Kraljevo, Serbia, EUR 35 mio should be invested over the next five years. A large-scale project called "TayalSPA" is being planned in Algeria for the construction of an integrated textile and clothing factory in the Sidi Khetab industrial zone in the province of Relizane. According to Taypa CEO Burak Karaarslan, quoted in the business paper "Dünya", this project, with an support of 50 percent by the Algerian government will receive investments totaling USD 2 billion in three phases until 2023.

USD 800 mio will be invested in the recently started initial construction phase. The company will start with yarn production first. Thereafter, from the end of 2018, the production of denim and other fabrics will commence. After completion of the first phase, the annual production will reach 30 million meters of denim and non-denim fabrics, 14 million meters of fabrics for shirts, 3,200 tons of knitwear and 30 million pieces of ready-made garments.    

Government encourages investment in research and development

The Turkish state has been promoting investments in design since 2016: By Law No. 6676 of February16th 2016 (Government Gazette "Resmi Gazete" No. 29636 of 26.02.16) amending Law No. 5746 of 28.02.08 on the promotion R & D activities, in contrast to the previous practice, investment in design projects were concluded in the government support. Thus, companies that employ at least 15 people (previously 30) in the R & D sector can benefit from tax and customs privileges. Imported products for research projects are exempt from import duties.

Comprehensive support measures in the form of project-based grants for the marketing of Turkish brands abroad also include Regulation No. 2016/1 of the Turkish Monetary Credit and Coordination Council, which was announced in the Official Gazette No. 29898 of November 24th 2016. The implementation of subsidies is the responsibility of the Ministry of Economy.

According to figures from the Ministry of Science, Industry and Technology, there are a total of 38 R & D and 29 design centers nationwide in the textile and clothing industry.

Germany is most important target market

Turkey is a major exporter of textiles and clothing. According to official statistics, the country exported USD 24.3 billion worth of textiles and clothing in 2016 (including USD 16.7 billion in ready-to-wear articles). The export association IHKIB is targeting USD 60 billion in ready-to-wear exports in 2023. In apparel, Germany is the most important customer with a share of 18.8 percent. For textiles and textile raw materials, the country is the fourth largest market for Turkish exporters with 5 percent.     

Turkish foreign trade in confectionery (in USD mio)
Year   Export Import
2014 18,484.6 3,062.4
2015 16,756.3 2,846.9
2016 16,739.3 2,690.7

Source: Export Association IHKIB; Turkish Ministry of Economy

Turkish foreign trade in textiles and textile raw materials (in USD mio.)
Year Export Import
2014 8,535.9 9,172.9
2015 7,590.8 8,270.4
2016 7,568.8 8,171.0

Source: IHKIB; Ministry of Economy

Turkish export of garments by country (in USD mio) 
  2015 2016 Share 2016 (%)
Total    16,756.3 16,739.3 100.0
Germany  3,156.4 3,139.9 18.8
United Kingdom 2,187.2 2,015.1    12.0
Spain 1,666.0  1,738.8    10.4
France 871.3   837.2   5.0
Netherlands 803.1 774.9 4.6
Italy 592.4 610.9 3.6
Irak 741.1 558.9 3.3
Polen 445.6 556.1 3.3
USA 493.2 533.6 3.2
Denmark 401.0 422.3 2.5

Source: IHKIB; Ministry of Economy

Turkish exports of textiles and textile raw materials by country (in USD mio)
  2015 2016 Share 2016 (%)
Total 7,590.8 7,568.8 100
Italy 748.9 729.5 9.6
Bulgaria 309.6 598.1 7.9
Iran 319.2 387.9 5.1
Germany 384.4 380.7 5.0
USA 346.1 313.1 4.1
United Kingdom 330.5 303.7 4.0
Spain 251.2 284.9 3.8
Romania 285.7 278.2 3.7
Polen 269.1 275.1 3.6
Egypt 246.7 225.0 3.0

Source: IHKIB; Ministry of Economy  

12.09.2017

THE CLOTHING MARKET IS WORRIED ABOUT BREXIT

  • In 2017 stagnation expected
  • British buy by mouse click
London (GTAI) - The up to now good sales opportunities for German clothing in the consume active United Kingdom suffer from the upcoming Brexit. The weaker pound sterling makes the goods from abroad more expensive. In addition, it raises inflation and lowers the real income, which will have a negative impact on consumer growth over a longer period, together with a likely decline in net immigrant numbers.
  • In 2017 stagnation expected
  • British buy by mouse click
London (GTAI) - The up to now good sales opportunities for German clothing in the consume active United Kingdom suffer from the upcoming Brexit. The weaker pound sterling makes the goods from abroad more expensive. In addition, it raises inflation and lowers the real income, which will have a negative impact on consumer growth over a longer period, together with a likely decline in net immigrant numbers.

Currently it is expected, that the EU exit of the British will take place at the end of March 2019. At what conditions, German exporters can deliver to British customers after the completion of the Brexit will only have to be negotiated in the coming months. Many hope for a transitional solution and a subsequent free trade agreement. A "very hard “Brexit", including a withdrawal from WTO standards and an introduction of customs duties, was not very likely to be drafted (mid-2017), but it could not be completely ruled out.
 
United Kingdom clothing imports in USD million; change in %  
SITC-Position Name 2010 2016 Change 2016/10 in %
841+843 Men's wear 4,290 5,006 16.7
842+844 Women's wear 7,064 7,727 9.4
845 Clothing from textile fabrics 7,113 7,246 1.9
.davon 845.3 Sweaters, Knitwear jackets 2,606 2,609 0.1
.davon 845.4 T-Shirts, underwear 2,266 2,130 -6
846 Clothing accessories 1,185 1,219 2.9
848 Clothing made out of other materials  1,167 1,203 3.1
Sources: Eurostat; Original data in EUR (as of 4.4.17), own calculations; Average exchange rate: Deutsche Bundesbank 2010: 1 Euro = 1.3257 US$; 2015: 1 Euro = 1.1095 US$; 2016: 1 Euro = 1.1069 US$

Consumption without verve
The poor consumer confidence of the British was shown already in the retail sales of the first quarter of 2017. For the first time in years, retailers sold less merchandise in the first quarter of 2017 than in the previous quarter (real -1.4 percent, without fuel: real -1.2 percent). In the second quarter the sales recovered slightly, so at least to the year-on-year level (real + 5 percent compared to the previous quarter, excluding fuel +1.1 percent). A major factor was the strong demand for summer clothing due to the season. For apparel the British spent some USD 71 billion in 2016. This corresponds to about 4.4 per cent of their household income and a real increase of 3.9 per cent compared to the previous year (in national currency). In 2015 the increase was still 6.6 percent. According to experts the clothing market will grow only very slightly in 2017.
 
From cheap to exclusive 
While the British style of clothing is a rather conservative one, in the nine-million-inhabitant city of London almost everything is in demand: from very cheap to ultra-luxurious, both chic business clothes and totally freaked out. The exquisite boutiques and flagship stores of the most expensive labels in the world are located on the famous Oxford Street and in the districts of Knightsbridge, Kensington and Chelsea .
There no discounter can be found. Aldi and Lidl are expanding all the more outside the center and in small towns. This can also lead to sales opportunities for German clothing suppliers. According to media reports, especially Aldi is planning a major expansion.

Brits buy clothes online 
No other folks buy as much per capita as the British. Amazon is the fourth most popular clothing retailer, after Primark, Next and Marks & Spencer. The British preference for e-commerce can create good opportunities for German suppliers which are not (yet) on site with their own stores.

Detailed information can be found in the GTAI brochure "Purchasing and consumption behavior United Kingdom", available at http://www.gtai.de/vereinigtes-koenigreich.
 
Source:

Annika Pattberg, Germany Trade & Invest www.gtai.de

Mauritius day Düsseldorf © brit berlin / pixelio.de
11.04.2017

MAURITIUS DAY DÜSSELDORF

Destination Mauritius - rebuiding former relationsships

Island of dreams in the middle of the Indian ocean for some travellers neighbouring the last European outpost, French overseas department La Réunion, a destination for reliable production of textiles and apparel for the European, notably German fashion market, this is the spectrum
of associations that Mauritius evokes in the heads of people. Mauritius looks back on a long time experience in producing textiles and apparel since its independence from Britain in 1968. Republic since 1992 the group of islands is one of the very few stable democracies in Africa.

Destination Mauritius - rebuiding former relationsships

Island of dreams in the middle of the Indian ocean for some travellers neighbouring the last European outpost, French overseas department La Réunion, a destination for reliable production of textiles and apparel for the European, notably German fashion market, this is the spectrum
of associations that Mauritius evokes in the heads of people. Mauritius looks back on a long time experience in producing textiles and apparel since its independence from Britain in 1968. Republic since 1992 the group of islands is one of the very few stable democracies in Africa.

Arvind Radhakrishna, CEO of Enterprise Mauritius, the organiser of the Mauritius day, April 5, 2017 at Düsseldorf Fashion House II, gives it a strong regret that the relation between Mauritius and Germany, mainly based on knitwear, dating back in the early 70ies nearly came to an end. The amount of textile exports into Germany in 2015 was just about 30 million Euros and counting. Anyhow this does not represent the strength of the Mauritian apparel industry which is a hub in the region with own inland production completed by production plants on the neighbour island Madagascar, in South Africa and some even in Bangladesh to serve a lower price level, which cannot be achieved with Mauritian production itself. In 2015, domestic exports to Europe accounted for 40 %, USA: 24% and South Africa: 21%. Charming is the fact that the delivery of Mauritian goods is duty free.

Strong support by the government

Interested buyers are heartily invited to come and see with their own eyes what the Mauritian textile and apparel industry can offer. This industry is one of the strong pillars of the gross domestic output. Others are tourism and - up and coming - the lapidary and jewellery industry. Traditional fields of production are spices, sugarcane products including rum or cosmetics.

To foster textiles and apparel exports the government sponsors airfreight costs by 40%, part of a holistic program in the speed to market scheme. To compare the benefits of Mauritius as a sourcing destination compared for example with China, besides the shorter distance, is that the minimum order quantities per style are much smaller than in China, the quality standard is high, the social compliance is given. Mauritian companies must spend 1% of their gains for Corporate Social Responsibility – CSR projects. Certificates such as BSCI, SA8000 or WRAP are common. Free entry to the EU market is guaranteed by the EU partnership agreement. And - a point that should not be neglected - most of the companies offer creative services executed by their inhouse design departments or people. This makes it clearer why the textile and apparel industry had been a strong engine for economic growth in Mauritius.

Main products are: T-Shirts, Polo Shirts, Shirts, Trousers & Denim, Pullovers & Cardigans, Formal Suits, Beachwear & Underwear, and Childrenswear etc. Main material used: cotton and its blends. There is a strong focus on knitted fabrics and jerseys of all kind paired with woven denims. The price segment of Mauritian clothing mainly ranges in the lower middle range. There is a high awareness for sustainability. The exporting companies aim to use eco-friendly substances in resources saving production processes. Laser technology for effects on denim is widely in use.

A look to the companies presenting

  • FINE TEXTILES LTD
    Contact: Mamade Nohur 
    Tel.: +230 2661092/57321079
    E-mail: finetextileltd@gmail.com
    Type: Final Product
    Products: Polo shirts/T-shirts/Sweat shirts
    Minimum order: 600 pcs. per colour
    Fine Textiles mostly produce menswear. They distribute their garments under own label M*RIYANO and private label for their customers. The own label is calculated to compete with the Chinese market. Time from sample to delivery takes about 5 to 6 weeks.

 

  • FIREMOUNT TEXTILES LTD / FM DENIM LTD
    Contact: Sangeeta Gobin
    Tel.: +230 2075836
    Email: sangeeta@firemount.mu
    Website: www.firemount.mu
    Type: Final Product
    Products: Denim fabrics & Denim and Twill Jeans pants/Jackets/shirts/Shorts/Dresses
    Minimum order: 6000-7000 yd. fabric or 2500-3000 pcs. of jeans per order
    Certifications: WRAP
    The company is fully vertical and the biggest supplier of apparel in Mauritius, still growing, looking for direct relations to retailers. Due to the latest technologies available, the company aims to fulfil the needs for sustainable production. Stretch, even power stretch is used in nearly every jeans style.

 

  • TEX KNITS LTD
    Contact: Suresh Radha
    Tel.: +230 2865577
    Email: info@texinternational.com
    Type: Final Product
    Products: Denim trousers, jackets, shirts etc. /Knitted garments for ladies, men and children
    Minimum order: 800 pcs. per style/colour
    Certifications: Sedex Members Ethical Trade Audit (SMETA)
    The knits company is part of a group offering garments in a broad range. To serve the UK market they run an office in London. The company puts a strong focus on design input for the international clients. Production plants in Madagascar and Bangladesh serves different price ranges.

 

  • PALMAR LTEE
    Contacts: Yannick Capiron (Knits), Genevieve Marie Figaro (Denim)
    Tel.: +230 401 7000
    Email: y.capiron@palmar.intnet.mu; gfigaro@palmar.intnet.mu
    Type: CMT & Final Product
    Products: Jeans, Chinos, Shorts, Dresses, Skirts for kids, Women & Men
    Minimum order: 600 pcs. for jerseys; 800 pcs. for jeans
    Over two thirds of the production is for menswear. The company is a family business which takes special interest in sustainable and resources saving production. The knitting department is fully
    vertically integrated. A fair trade line is being offered, pure organic is in development.Contact: Ranil Gunasekara
    Tel.: +230 4130034
    Email: camdenimltd@gmail.com
    Type: Final Product
    Products: Denim jeans for men, women, children and toddlers
    Minimum order: 1200 per style
    The company solely works for private labels. The main market until now is South Africa. The production is going to be shifted to a higher percentage of eco-friendly production, representing 17% for the time being. Prices range in the upper middle segment.

 

  • TARA KNITWEAR LTD
    Contact: Fabiola Law
    Tel.: +230 2123715/52553621
    Email: fabiolalaw@taragroup.intnet.mu
    Type: Final Product
    Products: T-shirt, polo shirt, sweat shirt, hoody, short, pant, skirt, dress, baby grow, baby/kid swear accessories (beanie, bootie, blanket, sleeping bag, headband), sleepwear, loungewear
    Minimum order: Basic styles: 4000 units. Fancy styles: 1000-2000 units
    Certifications: BSCI
    Tara is very design oriented with a big in house design department open for design services to customers too. The company's organisation is vertically integrated. Modern equipment such as the
    Eton Mover system enables the company to react fast and operate Fast Track orders too.

 

  • BEACHWEAR EXPORTS
    Contact: Mr. G.M Toolsee
    Tel.: +230 4545600
    Email: girdhar@beachwear.intnet.mu/beachwear@intnet.mu
    Type: Final Product
    Products: Swimwear and related products
    Minimum order: 300-500 units per style
    Certification: BSCI, SMETA, SEDEX
    All production is for private label. The company features as the leading supplier of swim and beach wear in Mauritius. Well known international brands are customers from US to Europe, mainly in Italy, France and UK as well as South Africa and Zimbabwe.

 

Greenshowroom and Ethical Fashion Show Berlin © Messe Frankfurt Exhibition GmbH
06.12.2016

GREENSHOWROOM & ETHICAL FASHION SHOW BERLIN: PLAIN SAILING INTO THE WINTER SEASON

  • New exhibition area at the Club
  • Key topic "ActiveSlow": design and performance meet resource efficiency and recyclability

Enlarged surface area and strong support from exhibitors: excellent signs for Greenshowroom and the Ethical Fashion Show Berlin as they enter the busy preparation phase. 'The booking situation for both trade fairs is highly promising. We have a number of strong labels on board, including both global pioneers and up-and-coming newcomers from the eco fashion segment', says Olaf Schmidt, Vice President Textiles & Textile Technologies at Messe Frankfurt. From 17-19 January 2017, visitors can look forward to an inspiring product range and the largest exhibition surface area the trade fair duo has so far enjoyed on the site of the Berlin Postbahnhof.

  • New exhibition area at the Club
  • Key topic "ActiveSlow": design and performance meet resource efficiency and recyclability

Enlarged surface area and strong support from exhibitors: excellent signs for Greenshowroom and the Ethical Fashion Show Berlin as they enter the busy preparation phase. 'The booking situation for both trade fairs is highly promising. We have a number of strong labels on board, including both global pioneers and up-and-coming newcomers from the eco fashion segment', says Olaf Schmidt, Vice President Textiles & Textile Technologies at Messe Frankfurt. From 17-19 January 2017, visitors can look forward to an inspiring product range and the largest exhibition surface area the trade fair duo has so far enjoyed on the site of the Berlin Postbahnhof.

Greenshowroom is all about highquality labels presenting contemporary styles. The highlights on the upper floor of the Postbahnhof include Ackermann Taschenmanufaktur with its timelessly elegant bags made from olive leaf-dyed cow leather and aged chamois tanned deer leather – designed and made at the company's own manufactory in Lüneburg. Living Blue, a premium label from northern Bangladesh, will present its new products once again. It creates superb accessories and fashionable pieces using local craftsmanship and home-grown organic indigo dye. New to the trade fairs is the Dutch-New  to Greenshowroom: Rhumnaa South African newcomer label Rhumnaa. The designers at Rhumnaa get their inspiration from the stories of South African artists and develop high-quality fashion lines.

The streetwear segment at the Ethical Fashion Show Berlin will also sparkle with numerous top players. With ShineConcept, Johanna Riplinger presents her second line in the casual segment. The new women's outerwear collection is based on the use of organic cotton that has been enhanced by pure vegetable dyes and is fairly produced in India. Langbrett from Berlin promises trendy clothing, art and zest for life for city residents who surf and is thus one of the major emerging labels at the Ethical Fashion Show Berlin. Remei presents its new Naturaline collection: shirts, sweaters, trousers and more made from sustainably produced organic cotton for the whole family. Lanius will present a collaboration with Kunert, a premium expert in hosiery. Their special focus is on colourful knit groups and new developments in the merino wool segment, namely Lanius ecowool. And the Danish label Amov will celebrate its début at the trade fair – stylish, minimalistic and long-lasting everyday favourites. In January, the Danish newcomers will unveil their third main collection, which has been developed by designer Winnie Wilki Fristrup. The Ethical Fashion Show is developing not only in terms of quality, but also space, and will be expanding its surface area: an additional exhibition area will be created in the Club at the Postbahnhof. The expansion of the surface area has been made possible by moving the fashion shows to the neighboring Energieforum.

Key topic "ActiveSlow"

Progressive design and performance in combination with resource efficiency and recyclability are the central themes of the winter season. In a showcase entitled "Active Wear +", Manufactum and ESMOD Berlin International University of Art for Fashion present a selection of prototypical functional clothing. Selected exhibitors from both trade fairs will also present design innovations that are characterised by their particular focus on resource efficiency, slowness and recyclability. More in-depth information will be provided at the panel discussion entitled: "Save the sea: the issue of textile shedding into water bodies".

ECO-FASHION GREENSHOWROOM UND ETHICAL FASHION SHOW BERLIN MESSE-DUO MIT HOCHKLASSIGEM RAHMENPROGRAMM © Messe Frankfurt Exhibition GmbH
14.06.2016

ECO-FASHION GREENSHOWROOM UND ETHICAL FASHION SHOW BERLIN MESSE-DUO MIT HOCHKLASSIGEM RAHMENPROGRAMM

  • DTB Info Day: CSR-focused series of talks on the Wednesday of the trade fair
  • Three-day programme: fashion shows, talks, podium discussions and tours
With an extensive event programme, the two trade fairs for eco-fashion, Greenshowroom and Ethical Fashion Show Berlin, will provide a comprehensive update on sustainability and fashion-related issues. From 28-30 June 2016, the talks, podium discussions and tours will provide first-rate information and networking opportunities. Well-known representatives from the worlds of fashion, politics, film and television are expected to attend the podium discussions and be in the audience. The two fashion shows "Salonshow" and "Ethical Fashion on Stage" promise an increased glamour factor.
  • DTB Info Day: CSR-focused series of talks on the Wednesday of the trade fair
  • Three-day programme: fashion shows, talks, podium discussions and tours
With an extensive event programme, the two trade fairs for eco-fashion, Greenshowroom and Ethical Fashion Show Berlin, will provide a comprehensive update on sustainability and fashion-related issues. From 28-30 June 2016, the talks, podium discussions and tours will provide first-rate information and networking opportunities. Well-known representatives from the worlds of fashion, politics, film and television are expected to attend the podium discussions and be in the audience. The two fashion shows "Salonshow" and "Ethical Fashion on Stage" promise an increased glamour factor. Invited guests can look forward to catwalk presentations by international Designers.
 
All eyes will be on the catwalk from the very first day of the trade fair onwards (Tuesday 28 June): The event will kick off with the "Salonshow" as an official offshoot event of the Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Berlin. From 3 p.m. onwards, designers from Greenshowroom will present selected high fashion looks from their 2017 summer collections in the Club of the Postbahnhof. The show will be given a new Parisian slant: designer Eymeric François will be working on the staging of the salon show for the first time. As a director of numerous fashion shows, he has already enjoyed much success at Messe Frankfurt's textile trade fairs in Paris. 'The challenge lies in creating a highly professional internationally-oriented show that is up-to-date with trends and also retains the ethical aspect', explains François about the aim of the event.
 
Part two of the show programme follows at 5 p.m.: the catwalk show "Ethical Fashion on Stage" showcases street and casualwear. Lavera will also present the winner of the Lavera Green Fashion Awards, Ina Budde. The designer and founder of Design for Circularity has developed a circular collection for the label Jan'n June – which can be seen live at "Ethical Fashion on Stage".
 
The second day of the trade fair (Wednesday 29 June) focuses on CSR: for the first time, the Dialog Textil-Bekleidung (DTB) will host its CSR day in cooperation with Messe Frankfurt. There will also be a whole-day symposium held in the Club of the Postbahnhof entitled "Responsible Management of Supply Chains – Social Compliance and Chemical Input". The agenda includes topics such as "The consequences of globalised trade", "Corporate Responsibility Review 2016" and "Transparent and sustainable sourcing". An open panel discussion on the theme of "The Emperor's New Clothes – is transparency coming to the fashion world?" invites attendees to discuss practical questions in greater depth with speakers, exhibitors and companies.
 
On the third day of the trade fair (Thursday 30 June), a comprehensive programme awaits – with presentations by Fairtrade Deutschland, GOTS and IVN, Textile Exchange and Fair Wear Foundation. Renate Künast (Bündnis 90/Die Grünen), Stefan Genth (HDE Handelsverband Deutschland),  Matthias Hebeler (Brainshirt) and Claudia Lanius (Lanius) will discuss transparency in the supply chain at 2 p.m.

An overview of the programme (location: Club at the Postbahnhof):
Tuesday 28 June 2016

10 a.m. Opening. In German.
10.30 a.m. Press tour following the opening (start point: press Lounge)
11 a.m. Press conference TransFair e.V. "Designing supply chains to be sustainable – Fairtrade textile standards and textile plan" (location: press lounge, upper floor, Postbahnhof). In German.
2 p.m. Press tour (start point: press Lounge)
3 p.m. Salonshow with outfits by Austriandesign.at, Bhusattva, Carpasus, Cocccon, Elementum by Daniela Pais, Elisa F., Heartcouture, Inti Ferreira, Lanius, Soome, Studio Elsien Gringhuis, Studio Jux, Tuschimo. Invitation only!
5 p.m. Ethical Fashion on Stage with outfits by Anzüglich organic and fair, Chapati, Daily´s Nothings Better, De'qua, Get Lazy, La Robe d'Inna, Milena with Love, Mud Jeans, Najha, Noumenon, Päälä, Tijar, Tranquillo, Verena Bellutti. Invitation only!

Wednesday 29 June 2016
DTB Infotag – Responsible Management of Supply Chains Social Compliance and Chemical Input
Moderation: Rolf Heimann, Vorstand, hessnatur Stiftung

10.00 a.m. Welcome and introduction by the DTB and Messe Frankfurt
10.15 a.m. "The consequences of global free trade", Dr Sabine Ferenschild, Research Assistant, Südwind e.V.
10.45 a.m. "Corporate Responsibility Review 2016 – annual report on global corporate responsibility", Lisa Häuser, Senior Analyst, Oekom Research AG
11.30 a.m. "Transparent and sustainable sourcing", Deniz Thiede, Managing Director, ATICS GmbH
11.50 a.m. "Sustainability, REACH etc. – Quo Vadis?“, Dr Dirk von Czarnowski, Vice President Global Chemical, Intertek Holding Deutschland GmbH
12.15 a.m. Guided tour(s) of the trade fairs
1.45 p.m. Update on the Partnership for Sustainable Textiles, Dr Bernhard Felmberg, assistant state secretary, Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development
2 p.m.  Presentation of a collaborative project to promote sustainability, Carolin Bohrke, hessnatur Stiftung
2.20 p.m. "Best practices in supply chain management transparency", Prof. Patrick Kugler, HAW Hamburg
2.40 p.m. "Company-customer relationships in a CSR context", Prof. Rudolf Voller, Hochschule Niederrhein
3.15 p.m. "The Emperor's New Clothes – is transparency coming to the fashion industry?" Panel discussion with speakers, exhibitors and companies in the industry
12.30 p.m. Press conference Bündnis für nachhaltige Textilien / GiZ (location: press lounge, upper floor, Postbahnhof)

Thursday 30 June 2016

10 a.m. Talk “The true costs of cotton", Mariska Przyklenk, Fairtrade Deutschland. In German.
11.30 a.m. Talk "GOTS and IVN-Best summarised. How the certification ensures that you can meet the requirements of governmental and non-governmental organisations", Claudia Kersten, GOTS und Heike Scheuer, IVN. In German.
1 p.m. Talk "More sustainable fibres and materials – from vision to volume", Simone Seisl, Textile Exchange. In German.
2 p.m. Podium discussion "Transparency in the supply chain", with Renate Künast (MdB, Bündnis 90/Die Grünen), Stefan Genth (Managing Director HDE Handelsverband Deutschland), Matthias Hebeler (Managing Director Brainshirt), Claudia Lanius (Managing Director Lanius). In German.
3.30 p.m. Talk and interactive game: "Fair Wear Foundation towards sustainable global garment supply chains", Andrea Spithoff and Maaike Payet, Fair Wear Foundation. In English.

 

Videos, photos and other Information:
www.greenshowroom.com
www.ethicalfashionshowberlin.com
www.facebook.com/greenshowroom
www.facebook.com/ethicalfashionshowberlin
www.youtube.com/greenshowroom
www.youtube.com/EFSBerlin
www.instagram.com/greenshowroom
www.instagram.com/ethicalfashionshowberlin