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25.01.2022

momox fashion presents Second Hand Fashion Report 2022

  • Representative study with almost 8,000 participants regarding the second hand fashion market in Germany
  • Second hand replaces new: 84 percent have bought less new goods due to second hand shopping
  • 71 percent have spent less money on new goods because they have bought second-hand clothing
  • For just under one in two (45 percent), buying second-hand clothing has become a matter of course
  • When buying second-hand fashion, sustainable production is more important (60 percent) than the brand name (48 percent)

Second hand replaces new - that's what 84 percent of second hand shoppers in Germany say, stating that buying second hand items has replaced buying a new clothing item for them.

  • Representative study with almost 8,000 participants regarding the second hand fashion market in Germany
  • Second hand replaces new: 84 percent have bought less new goods due to second hand shopping
  • 71 percent have spent less money on new goods because they have bought second-hand clothing
  • For just under one in two (45 percent), buying second-hand clothing has become a matter of course
  • When buying second-hand fashion, sustainable production is more important (60 percent) than the brand name (48 percent)

Second hand replaces new - that's what 84 percent of second hand shoppers in Germany say, stating that buying second hand items has replaced buying a new clothing item for them. Another 71 percent state that they have spent less money on clothing because they have bought used items.** These are the results of the current Second Hand Fashion Report 2022, for which the second hand online store momox fashion has conducted two studies for the third time in a row: A representative survey in cooperation with the market research institute Kantar as well as a customer survey among momox fashion customers to get detailed insights into the second hand clothing market. A total of 7,826 people took part in the surveys.

Buying second hand clothes has become a matter of course for every second person
The representative Kantar survey shows that buying second-hand clothing has become routine: 67 percent of Germans have already bought second-hand clothing at some point - an increase of eleven percent on the previous year. More than one in two (56 percent) do so regularly - at least once a year. For 45 percent, buying second-hand clothing has become a matter of course or very much a matter of course. In addition, more than half of Germans (53 percent) estimate that their closet consists of up to 20 percent second-hand clothing.*

Second hand clothing is not only shopped online, but also sold
The most popular way to buy used clothing is online shopping: 44 percent of respondents buy their second-hand fashion pieces online. Around one in three (28 percent) go to second-hand stores in search of their next favorite second-hand item, followed by flea markets with 14 percent. Surprisingly, the 50+ generation in particular likes to buy online (44 percent). Generation Z (under 25s), however, prefers second-hand stores (30 percent).*

But it is not only second-hand online shopping that is popular. Almost one in two (45 percent) resells used clothing, preferably online (76 percent). Only 11 percent sell at flea markets and 8 percent at second-hand stores.*

Sustainability remains main motivation for buying used clothing
To find out more about the reasons for buying second-hand clothing, momox fashion conducted a customer survey among almost 7,000 participants. The main motivation for buying second-hand clothing continues to be the sustainability aspect with 87 percent. 83 percent buy second-hand clothing because of the price savings compared to new goods. Around one in two (49 percent) goes in search of clothing in second-hand stores because the desired items are no longer available in regular stores.**

Almost all respondents (91 percent) generally consider sustainability and environmental protection to be important or very important when buying clothing. This is also reflected in consumer behavior: Around three quarters (85 percent) try to buy second-hand whenever possible. 58 percent make sure to purchase sustainable clothing. And 31 percent use environmentally friendly products for the care and cleaning of clothing.**

Sustainable production or brand name - which is more important?
For more than half (51 percent) of the respondents, the brand name is less important or unimportant when buying used clothing. Whether the clothing was produced sustainably, on the other hand, is considered by 60 percent to be very important or important. Especially for the 60+ generation (75 percent), sustainable production of second-hand clothing is very important or important.**

Second hand clothing is especially popular among parents
However, second-hand clothing is not only bought for oneself, almost every fifth person (18 percent) also buys it for his/her children.* Among the parents of the second-hand shoppers, 85 percent buy second-hand clothing for their children. Online stores (58 percent) and online marketplaces and second-hand online stores (51 percent) are the most popular. 43 percent buy used children's clothing from friends. 33 percent like to go shopping in second-hand stores and another 23 percent in stationary children's clothing stores. At the same time, 63 percent of respondents say they buy more second-hand clothing since becoming parents.**

Jackets and coats are second hand top sellers
Second-hand jackets and coats (70 percent) are the most popular items, followed by sweaters (60 percent), dresses and skirts (56 percent) and pants (49 percent). Pants and sweaters seem to have become more popular among second-hand shoppers compared to the previous year (previous year: 46 percent and 51 percent). Younger shoppers (18-29 year olds) prefer to buy their sweaters second hand even more than jackets and coats (80 percent).**

Sources:
* Kantar survey
** momox fashion survey
 
Method:
Kantar survey: number of cases (n=1,037), target group: 16-64 years; method: online survey in the survey period (13.-16.11.2021), conducted by Kantar Deutschland GmbH on behalf of momox AG.
 
momox fashion survey: number of cases (n=6,789), survey period (21.-26.10.2021), target group: momox fashion customers aged under 18 to over 60; method: online survey, conducted by momox AG

Download of study (in German)

(c) Schoeller Textil AG
18.01.2022

A jacket from a jacket from a jacket ...

Manufacture, wear, wash, incinerate: This typical life cycle of garments, which pollutes the environment, is to be changed in the future – towards principles of circular economy with recycling at its core. Using an outdoor jacket made from PET bottles and recycled materials, Empa researchers have investigated whether the product actually delivers what the idea promises.

At first glance, it's a normal rain jacket: three layers of polyester, a lining on the inside, a water vapor-permeable membrane on top and water-repellent fabric on the outside, with a hood. But the zipper makes you wonder. Instead of ending at collar height, it pulls up over the forehead ... – who would pull it that far?

Manufacture, wear, wash, incinerate: This typical life cycle of garments, which pollutes the environment, is to be changed in the future – towards principles of circular economy with recycling at its core. Using an outdoor jacket made from PET bottles and recycled materials, Empa researchers have investigated whether the product actually delivers what the idea promises.

At first glance, it's a normal rain jacket: three layers of polyester, a lining on the inside, a water vapor-permeable membrane on top and water-repellent fabric on the outside, with a hood. But the zipper makes you wonder. Instead of ending at collar height, it pulls up over the forehead ... – who would pull it that far?

The explanation is given by Annette Mark from textile manufacturer BTK Europe, who contributed to this product. The zipper is intended to be an eye-catcher – and is primarily for recycling: Sewn tight with a thread that dissolves in boiling water, it is easier to remove than two fasteners. "Pull once and you're done," says the expert on textiles and recycling. The light green color is also due to recycling: The raw material, a granule made from a mixture of different but single-variety textiles, is dark green – and melting and spinning out the material for new yarns lightens it.

Circular economy within textile industry
Magnetic buttons, seams, hems: Every detail of the jacket follows the Design2Recycle approach, as it says on the Wear2wear website. Six companies from Europe's textile industry have joined forces in this consortium to promote circular economy. After all, more than 70 percent of all textiles produced worldwide end up in landfills or incinerators without being recycled.

How can circular economy be acheived in this industry? A team from Empa's Technology and Society lab took a closer look at the jacket and its environmental impact using life cycle analyses over a four-year period of use; including washing it three times. The candidates: a jacket produced without circular economy methods, the "starter version" of the jacket available since 2019 in blue – with an outer layer made of polyester derived from used PET bottles – and the green version from the subsequent recycling process, in which unavoidable material losses are replaced by new polyester.

The researchers' analyses show that the recycled products perform better – in eleven environmental risk categories, including global warming, toxicity to ecosystems and water scarcity. There are strikingly large advantages in air pollution, for example, because fewer pollutants are released without incineration, as well as in water scarcity, especially for the green jacket after the first recycling "loop," for which PET bottles are no longer used.

Other insights from the analyses: In terms of greenhouse effect, the maximum benefit is a good 30 percent. And the use of PET bottles does not bring any major ecological benefits. What is decisive, on the other hand, is the number of recycling cycles to produce new jackets: The balance improves from jacket to jacket – provided the quality of the polyester remains high enough.

In practice, this is challenging, as Mark explains: "Depending on the origin, the raw material sometimes differs significantly." If the fibers have been coated with certain additives, the nozzles of the spinning machines can become clogged. And in general, the quality decreases with the number of recycling cycles: more irregular structures of the yarn and lower strength.

Annette Mark's conclusion on the Empa analyses: "very realistic" and useful for improvements. "The cooperation was very good," she says, "full transparency and no compromises." The researchers also found the collaboration fruitful. "Open collaboration between science and industry is enormously important," says former team member Gregor Braun, who has since left Empa and now works as a consultant for sustainability. "Sustainability and circular economy can work well together."

Will the jacket become a market success? "The textile industry is in a state of upheaval. A rethinking is taking place right now that we shouldn't miss," says Annette Mark. But large corporations that are already developing similar products "have completely different options." After all, talks are underway with a sportswear manufacturer – for a fleece jacket, for which the Empa findings could also be useful.

Microplastic fibers from textiles
Textiles made of polyester are making the headlines because of the release microplastic fibers – for instance, during washing – which is sometimes considered a threat to humans and the environment. Empa experts have studied the formation and release of microplastic fibers. Their results: Fibers are released primarily at the fabric's edges. Their formation and release depends, among other things, on the type of fiber, surface treatment and the type of cutting. Compared to other textiles, significantly fewer fibers are released from laser-cut textiles during washing. Empa is conducting studies with industrial partners to further reduce the formation of these fibers during textile production. In Swiss wastewater treatment plants, however, microfibers are largely removed from wastewater and incinerated with the sludge.

More information:
Empa PET Recycling polyester
Source:

EMPA, Norbert Raabe

Graphik: Pixabay
11.01.2022

FIMATEC innovation network enters second funding phase

The network for the development of fiber materials technology for healthcare and sports will receive funding from the Central Innovation Programme for SMEs (ZIM) for another two years.

The Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Climate Action (BMWi) approved a corresponding application in December 2021. This will continue to provide funding for the development of innovative functional fibers, smart textiles and application-optimized fiber composite materials until June 2023 and strengthen the technological competitiveness and innovative strength of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

The network for the development of fiber materials technology for healthcare and sports will receive funding from the Central Innovation Programme for SMEs (ZIM) for another two years.

The Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Climate Action (BMWi) approved a corresponding application in December 2021. This will continue to provide funding for the development of innovative functional fibers, smart textiles and application-optimized fiber composite materials until June 2023 and strengthen the technological competitiveness and innovative strength of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

For this purpose, the FIMATEC innovation network combines competences from different engineering and scientific disciplines with small and medium-sized manufacturers and service providers from the target sectors in medicine and sports (e.g. orthopaedics, prosthetics, surgery, smart textiles) as well as players from the textile and plastics industry.      

This interdisciplinary combination of industrial partners and application-oriented research institutions increases competitiveness and enables the players to realise their technical research and development projects quickly and in a targeted manner. The focus for the joint R&D projects of the companies and research institutions is on the development of innovative materials and efficient manufacturing technologies. 
          
Fiber-based materials have become indispensable in many applications in medicine and sports. As a pure fiber, processed into a textile or as a fiber composite plastic, they offer an almost unlimited variety for adjusting property and functional profiles. At the same time, the demands on the range of functions, performance and cost-effectiveness are constantly increasing, so that there is great potential for innovation. Developments are driven on the one hand by new materials and manufacturing processes, and on the other by innovative applications. Products with new and superior functions create a technological advantage over international competitors and enable higher sales revenues. In addition, efficient processes, application-optimized materials or even the integration of functions into the basic structure of textile materials lead to lower production costs and improved marketing opportunities in the future.
For developments in this context, the partners have joined forces in the FIMATEC innovation network, thus combining their expertise. Within the network, innovative materials and processes are being developed jointly in the following areas and tested in future-oriented products and services:

  • Functional fibers
    Innovative fiber materials with integrated functionalities
  • Preforming
    Highly load path optimized fiber orientations for complex fiber composite components.    
  • Smart Textiles
    Textile-based sensors and actuators
  • Hybrid material and manufacturing technologies
    Application-optimized components through cross-technology solution approaches.    
  • Fiber composites  
    Intelligent matrix systems and function-optimized fiber materials.    
  • Fiber-reinforced 3D printing  
    High-quality additive manufacturing processes for the efficient production of individualized products.

 
17 network partners are researching fiber-based materials for medical and sports technologyCurrently, ten companies and seven research institutions are involved in FIMATEC. Interested companies and research institutions as well as potential users can continue to participate in the cooperation network or R&D projects. In the course of membership, the partners are actively supported in identifying and initiating innovation projects as well as securing financing through funding acquisition. One application for ZIM project funding has already been approved by FIMATEC in its first year.

The aim of the already approved project "CFKadapt" is to develop a thermoformable fiber-plastic composite material for optimally adaptable orthopedic aids such as prostheses and orthoses. In the "Modul3Rad" project, which is currently being worked out in detail, the project partners intend to develop a modular lightweight frame system for the construction of user-friendly therapy tricycles, suitable for everyday use by severely and very severely disabled children. Three further collaborative projects are already in the planning stage.

The technology and knowledge transfer enables in particular small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) to access cutting-edge technological research, especially these are often denied access to innovations due to the lack of their own research departments. The IWS GmbH has taken over the network management for FIMATEC and supports the partners from the first idea to the search for suitable project partners and the preparation and coordination of funding applications. The aim is to obtain funding from the Central Innovation Programme for SMEs (ZIM), which offers companies funding opportunities for a wide range of technical innovation projects in cooperation with research institutions.

FIMATEC-netzwork partners
all ahead composites GmbH | Veitshöchheim | www.bike-ahead-composites.de
Altropol Kunststoff GmbH | Stockelsdorf | www.altropol.de
Diondo GmbH | Hattingen | www.diondo.com
Mailinger innovative fiber solutions GmbH | Sontra | www.mailinger.de
Sanitätshaus Manfred Klein GmbH & Co. KG | Stade | www.klein-sanitaetshaus.de
STREHL GmbH & Co KG | Bremervörde | www.rehastrehl.de
WESOM Textil GmbH | Olbersdorf | www.wesom-textil.de
Faserinstitut Bremen e.V. (FIBRE) | www.faserinstitut.de
E.F.M. GmbH | Olbersdorf | www.efm-gmbh.de
REHA-OT Lüneburg Melchior und Fittkau GmbH | Olbersdorf | www.rehaot.de
Fraunhofer-Institut für Fertigungstechnik und Angewandte Materialforschung IFAM | Bremen | www.ifam.fraunhofer.de
Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V. (IPF) | www.ipfdd.de
Institut für Polymertechnologien Wismar e.V. (IPT) | www.ipt-wismar.de
Institut für Verbundwerkstoffe GmbH | Kaiserslautern | www.ivw.uni-kl.de

Associated network partners
9T Labs AG | Zürich, Schweiz | www.9tlabs.com
Fachhochschule Nordwestschweiz, Institut für Kunststofftechnik (FHNW) | www.fhnw.ch
KATZ - Kunststoff Ausbildungs- und Technologie-Zentrum | Aarau, Schweiz | www.katz.ch

Source:

Textination / IWS Innovations- und Wissensstrategien GmbH

photo: pixabay
04.01.2022

EU Project: System Circularity & Innovative Recycling of Textiles

SCIRT stands for System Circularity & Innovative Recycling of Textiles. Coordinated by VITO, an independent Flemish research organisation in the cleantech and sustainable development sector, SCIRT is a three year EU-funded project from the Horizon 2020 Programme.

It aims to demonstrate a complete textile-to-textile recycling system for discarded clothing—or post-consumer textiles—involving stakeholders throughout the value chain and focusing on the recycling of natural fibres, synthetic fibres and fibre blends. To reach this goal, the project has set four main objectives.

SCIRT stands for System Circularity & Innovative Recycling of Textiles. Coordinated by VITO, an independent Flemish research organisation in the cleantech and sustainable development sector, SCIRT is a three year EU-funded project from the Horizon 2020 Programme.

It aims to demonstrate a complete textile-to-textile recycling system for discarded clothing—or post-consumer textiles—involving stakeholders throughout the value chain and focusing on the recycling of natural fibres, synthetic fibres and fibre blends. To reach this goal, the project has set four main objectives.

  • Deliver a closed-loop recycling solution for discarded textiles.
  • Stimulate and encourage conscious design as well as production practices.
  • Create new business opportunities by boosting textile value chain activity.
  • Raise awareness of the environmental and social impacts of buying clothes.

Gathering 18 partners from five countries, the SCIRT project held its virtual kick-off meeting in mid-2021 to begin tackling the issue of clothing waste and recyclability, one of the biggest challenges faced in the fashion industry today.

As clothing brands are setting ambitious targets and making promises to incorporate recycled fibres in their products, discarded textiles are piling up in abundance around the globe. Though it would seem that the stars of supply and demand have aligned for this part of the circular economy, the truth is that less than 1% of textile waste is recycled into new textile fibres, according to an Ellen MacArthur Foundation report published in 2017. This miniscule percentage is indicative of a greater problem-achieving circularity in the fashion industry is not just a question of supply and demand, but of the connection between the two. There is a lack of knowledge surrounding the technological, economic and environmental feasibility of recycling fibre mixtures, and a need to align the quality and cost of recycling processes with the demands of textile companies and fashion brands.

SCIRT will develop solutions to support systemic innovation towards a more circular fashion system and bridge this supply-demand gap. To address the demand side of the equation, SCIRT will demonstrate a complete textile-to-textile recycling system for discarded clothing, otherwise known as post-consumer textiles, involving stakeholders throughout the value chain and focusing on the recycling of natural and synthetic fibres, as well as fibre blends. With the support of technical partners and research institutes, clothing brands Decathlon, Petit Bateau, Bel & Bo, HNST and Xandres, will develop, prototype and produce six different representative types of apparel using post-consumer recycled fibres. These include formal and casual wear, sportswear, underwear and uniforms. Through this endeavour, SCIRT will prioritise quality and cost-effectiveness in order to ensure market confidence and encourage the broad uptake of post-consumer recycled fibres.

From a non-technological perspective, SCIRT will develop supporting policy measures and tools to facilitate the transition towards a circular system for apparel. This includes a framework for an eco-modulated Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) system and a True Cost Model to quantify circularity and increase value chain transparency. Special attention will also be given to the consumer perspective. To this end, Citizen Labs engaging consumers in various European locations, as well as a wider online engagement platform, will be developed to engage citizens throughout the project in order to understand the perceptions, motivations and emotions shaping their behaviour regarding the purchase, use, and disposal of textiles.

Over the next three years, SCIRT project partners will work to overcome current technological, economic, socio-economic and regulatory barriers faced in textiles recycling to achieve a real, lasting circular fashion economy.

2021:
The SCIRT project kicks off and partners identify the current state-of-the-art in apparel design, production and recycling, challenges and market trends, and stakeholder needs.

2022:
Designing and testing a fibre-to-fibre system by producing recycled yarns and filaments, free from harmful substances.

2023:
Formal wear, casual wear, sportswear, underwear and uniforms will be designed and produced using the optimized yarns developed.

Partners

  • Fashion companies: Bel&Bo, HNST, Decathlon, Xandres, Petit Bateau
  • Research organisations: VITO, CETI, Prospex Institute
  • Universities: BOKU, TU Wien, ESTIA
  • Industry players: Altex, AVS Spinning - A European Spinning Group (ESG) Company, Valvan
  • SMEs: Circular.fashion, FFact
  • Non-profit organisations: Flanders DC, IID-SII

 

ALTEX
ALTEX is a textile recycling company based in Germany that employs state-of-the-art machinery to recycle textile waste into new high-quality products. Its products include teared fibres, natural fibres, synthetic fibres and fibre blends among others.

Bel & Bo
Bel&Bo is a family-owned Belgian business with about 95 retail stores located throughout Belgium. Its mission is to offer colourful, fashionable and sustainably produced clothing for men, women and children at an affordable price.

CETI
The European Center for Innovative Textiles (CETI) is a non-profit organisation dedicated to conceiving, experimenting with and prototyping innovative textile materials and products through both private and collaborative R&D projects.

circular.fashion
circular.fashion offers software for circular design, intelligent textile sorting and closed-loop recycling, including the Circular Design Software and the circularity.ID®, as well as training and hands-on support to fashion brands in their transitions.

Decathlon
With over 315 stores in France, and 1,511 around the world, Decathlon has been innovating since 1976 to become the main player for athletic people. It has been engaged in reducing its environmental impact through a number of actions.

ESG
The European Spinning Group (ESG) is a textile group based in Belgium that offers a range of yarns produced with a highly technological open-end spinning mill for different applications, such as for interiors, fashion and technical textiles.

ESTIA
ESTIA is a French institute that has provided education and training in the areas of industrial technologies for 20 years. Since 2017, ESTIA has had a program focused on new materials and disruptive process in the fashion and textile industry.

FFACT
FFact is a unique group of management consultants that facilitates the implementation of sustainability from a business perspective, and translates facts into useful management information. FFact is based in the Netherlands and Belgium.

Flanders DC
The Flanders District of Creativity, a non-profit organisation based in Belgium, informs, coaches, promotes and inspires creative entrepreneurs in various sectors, including the fashion industry, who want to build or grow their business.

HNST
HNST is a Belgian circular denim brand that recovers post-consumer denim and recycles it into new fabric in the EU, creating durable and 100% recyclable jeans that use 82% less water and emit 76% less carbon dioxide than conventional jeans.

Petit Bateau
Petit Bateau is a French apparel brand that specialises in knit products. As a vertical company, Petit Bateau carries out its own knitting, dyeing, making up and store management with the support of its 3,000 employees.

Prospex Institute
The Prospex Institute aims to promote the participation of citizens and stakeholders in socially relevant decision-making dialogue and development by engaging with theorists and practitioners both in Belgium and abroad.

IID-SII
The Sustainable Innovation Institute is a French non-profit association based in Paris. Initiated by LGI, a French SME, the purpose of IID-SII is to act as a think and do tank on sustainable innovation to support the adoption of novel solutions.

TU Wien
TU Wien is an open academic institution where research, teaching and learning have taken place under the motto “Technology for people” for the past 200 years. One of its key areas of research is on recycling technology and fibre innovation.

BOKU
Research at the Institute for Environmental Biotechnology of BOKU based in Vienna, Austria focus on the exploitation of enzymes as powerful biocatalysts for biomaterials processing within recycling applications.

Valvan
Valvan Baling Systems has 30 years of experience in designing and constructing custom-made machinery, specialising in Baling Machines and Sorting Facilities for fibre producers, collectors, sorters and recyclers of textiles.

VITO
VITO, a leading independent European research and technology organisation in the cleantech and sustainable development sectors, aims to accelerate the transition towards a sustainable society by developing sustainable technologies.

Xandres
Xandres is a brand inspired by and for women. It is rooted in a highly respected tradition of fashion, driven by quality and created for the life women lead today. Xandres offers innovative designs with respect for luxury and the environment.

Es ist unendlich… © Jutta Jung
29.12.2021

Textile Designer Jutta Jung "WOMEN'S STORIES AND DREAMSCAPES"

  • ▪ Painting and Drawing by Jutta Jung
  • ▪ Exhibition in the gallery ART ROOM in Düsseldorf-Gerresheim (Germany) from 05-02-2022 – 04-03-2022
  • ▪ From Neo-Pop Art to Magic Realism

The creative signature of textile designer Jutta Jung cannot be pigeonholed - in her artistic expression, she moves between Neo-Pop Art, Figurative Expressionism and Magical Realism. In her upcoming exhibition at the ART ROOM-Düsseldorf gallery, the Neuss-based artist will be showing new realistic-expressive paintings with motifs of women, in which she combines textile-like structures with luminous pours of paint.

Jutta Jung: "We all live in one world, and yet we do not. We all see the same thing, but perceive it differently. The diversity of external and internal views has always fascinated me."

  • ▪ Painting and Drawing by Jutta Jung
  • ▪ Exhibition in the gallery ART ROOM in Düsseldorf-Gerresheim (Germany) from 05-02-2022 – 04-03-2022
  • ▪ From Neo-Pop Art to Magic Realism

The creative signature of textile designer Jutta Jung cannot be pigeonholed - in her artistic expression, she moves between Neo-Pop Art, Figurative Expressionism and Magical Realism. In her upcoming exhibition at the ART ROOM-Düsseldorf gallery, the Neuss-based artist will be showing new realistic-expressive paintings with motifs of women, in which she combines textile-like structures with luminous pours of paint.

Jutta Jung: "We all live in one world, and yet we do not. We all see the same thing, but perceive it differently. The diversity of external and internal views has always fascinated me."

As a counterpoint to her paintings of women, some of which are autobiographical in origin or can also stimulate the viewer's imagination for stories of their own, she is presenting a current series of surface paintings in the gallery. These are presented in her typical colourfulness and overlapping forms and structures.

This is complemented by an excerpt from her collection of "Women's Stories and Dream Landscapes" with expressive portrait drawings and abstract paintings. On large canvas formats, Jutta Jung works out in a painterly-gestural way what she wants to make visible. Power meets colour. Fine strokes and drawings are combined with painting on paper and in smaller formats - from contemplative to impulsive. Worlds of colour, abstracted landscapes, compositions that take up symbols and signs, figurative elements or depictions of people: Jutta Jung combines a variety of materials and artistic techniques in her paintings to depict her perspectives and ways of seeing. "There are always new worlds to discover," she says.

On the occasion of its 50th anniversary, the Kreismuseum Zons is showing the special event "Art to the Last Corner" from 13 May to 26 June 2022. Jutta Jung is one of seven selected artists and will present works on her theme "Global Ethno". The museum as part of a former castle with buildings from the 17th to the end of the 20th century gives exhibitions a special presentation framework. It also contains the 900 works of Prof. Helmut Hahn's life's work from forty years of activity.

Vita
Jutta Jung lives and works in the Rhineland. She completed her design studies (specialising in textile design) at the Niederrhein University of Applied Sciences in Krefeld with a diploma under Professor Helmut Hahn with the grade "very good". Her main subjects were free drawing, free painting, illustration, colour composition, conception & design, art science, design theory. In addition to her many years of work as a textile designer and collection designer in the Rhineland textile industry, she has been working as a freelance designer and artist in her own studio since 2003:
▪ Textile design and collection design for companies in Europe and Asia. (including fabric designs, porcelain decors and designs for handmade carpets).
▪ Free painting and sale of works to private collectors.
Since 2010, Jutta Jung has concentrated exclusively on free artistic work in painting and drawing. She is a member of Kunst.Neuss e.V. and the artist network crossart international.

Contact:
E-Mail: jutta-jung-artwork@gmx.de
Web: https://juttajungartwork.com/