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World Cotton Day on 7 October Highlights the Importance of Cotton for Development Policy (c) pixabay
Cotton
07.10.2020

October, 7th: World Cotton Day

  • World Cotton Day on 7 October Highlights the Importance of Cotton for Development Policy

Bremen - Stemming from a 2019 initiative of the African Cotton-4 countries Benin, Burkina Faso, Chad and Mali, World Cotton Day will take place this year on 7 October. The event is organised by the Geneva-based World Trade Organisation (WTO) and is supported by the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO), the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), the International Trade Centre (ITC) and the International Cotton Secretariat (ICAC). The Bremen Cotton Exchange is also involved.

“Cotton is often underestimated because it is so natural. Behind it are millions of people, for example many farmers, field workers, employees in ginning factories, logistics providers and traders. We want to honour their achievements,” said the President of the Bremen Cotton Exchange, Stephanie Silber.

  • World Cotton Day on 7 October Highlights the Importance of Cotton for Development Policy

Bremen - Stemming from a 2019 initiative of the African Cotton-4 countries Benin, Burkina Faso, Chad and Mali, World Cotton Day will take place this year on 7 October. The event is organised by the Geneva-based World Trade Organisation (WTO) and is supported by the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO), the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), the International Trade Centre (ITC) and the International Cotton Secretariat (ICAC). The Bremen Cotton Exchange is also involved.

“Cotton is often underestimated because it is so natural. Behind it are millions of people, for example many farmers, field workers, employees in ginning factories, logistics providers and traders. We want to honour their achievements,” said the President of the Bremen Cotton Exchange, Stephanie Silber.

According to the WTO, the aim of World Cotton Day is to highlight the global economic importance of cotton and to raise awareness of the raw material by recognising the work of everyone involved in its cultivation, processing and trade. At the same time, within the framework of international cooperation, it is hoped that supporters and investors can be found to aid with technological and economic progress within the cotton value chain.

This time, the entire world cotton community will be involved in World Cotton Day on Wednesday, 7 October 2020. A wide variety of campaigns and events are taking place everywhere to draw attention to the importance of cotton and its possible uses.

Cotton is one of the most relevant agricultural raw materials in the world. Around 26 million tonnes of it are harvested annually. Approximately 150 million people in almost 80 countries around the world live from the cultivation of the natural fibre. A large number of these live in developing countries, where cotton cultivation is of particular importance as a cash crop.

Cotton is known as an agricultural product that is turned into a textile. The raw material is indispensable in fashion and clothing – and has been for thousands of years. But the use of cotton now goes far beyond textiles. For example, cosmetic products such as hand creams and hair shampoo are made from the oil of cotton seeds. The raw material is also used in the manufacture of banknotes, furniture and technical textiles, as well as in medical technology.

Against the background of the current discussion on sustainability and sustainable consumption, the role of natural fibres is becoming even more important. Cotton is biodegradable and a renewable resource. It can be grown again and again in agriculture through cultivation in crop rotation. This secures incomes and enables efficient value creation within the global production and processing chain.

The Bremen Cotton Exchange will actively support World Cotton Day with cross-media coverage. In addition, in time for World Cotton Day, three thematically different, emotionally appealing short films about cotton will be launched. They are aimed at consumers as customers of the textile and clothing trade and provide information about the benefits and properties of cotton and answer questions about its sustainability. In keeping with the times, they will be published via virtual media.

34th International Cotton Conference Bremen (c) BREMER BAUMWOLLBÖRSE
Opening of the Cotton Conference 2018
26.03.2018

34th International Cotton Conference Bremen

  • Deep Insights into the Multifaceted World of Cotton
  • Quality, Innovation and Digitalisation are Crucial

From the 21st to the 23rd of March, the international cotton industry came together in the historic Bremen Town Hall, under the motto "Cotton Insights". More than 500 participants from almost 40 countries came to exchange views on the latest trends in the natural raw material as part of the conference organised by the Bremen Cotton Exchange in cooperation with the Fibre Institute Bremen. The 34th International Cotton Conference provided a varied, in-depth programme which addressed the current and burning issues within the industry.

Summarising his visit to the conference, Kai Hughes, Executive Director of the International Cotton Advisory Committee (ICAC) in Washington said “The Bremen Cotton Conference is unique because it brings the diverse world of cotton together in one place. It is always a great opportunity to learn about the latest innovations, talk to cotton merchants and get an overview of the industry".

  • Deep Insights into the Multifaceted World of Cotton
  • Quality, Innovation and Digitalisation are Crucial

From the 21st to the 23rd of March, the international cotton industry came together in the historic Bremen Town Hall, under the motto "Cotton Insights". More than 500 participants from almost 40 countries came to exchange views on the latest trends in the natural raw material as part of the conference organised by the Bremen Cotton Exchange in cooperation with the Fibre Institute Bremen. The 34th International Cotton Conference provided a varied, in-depth programme which addressed the current and burning issues within the industry.

Summarising his visit to the conference, Kai Hughes, Executive Director of the International Cotton Advisory Committee (ICAC) in Washington said “The Bremen Cotton Conference is unique because it brings the diverse world of cotton together in one place. It is always a great opportunity to learn about the latest innovations, talk to cotton merchants and get an overview of the industry".

Sustainability and Cotton
This year, the conference developed into a whole week of diverse events around the entire cotton supply chain. With the “SUSTAIN” event, which was organised in cooperation with the Weser-Kurier newspaper, it was possible to build a bridge between the issue of sustainability and the end consumer.
With the focus on Africa, the emerging continent, which also has a special significance for cotton, became the centre of attention.

In his opening speech, Henning Hammer, President of the Bremen Cotton Exchange, made it clear that sustainability is also of great importance during the Cotton Conference: "The three pillars of sustainability – the environment, the economy and social issues – were already playing a role in the cotton industry when the word sustainability was far from being on everyone's lips.
Many changes that are being demanded in the sense of responsible agriculture and responsible trade take their time, many are already in the starting blocks and a lot already exists. We have a very alert, active agricultural research worldwide."

The Keynotes
The keynote session, moderated by the journalist Lisa Boekhoff from the newspaper Weser-Kurier, gave participants an overview, with an informative analysis of the current cotton situation. Kai Hughes, executive director of ICAC, emphasised in his keynote address the need to provide credible facts and figures which should be the basis for the entire supply chain. The marketing of cotton and changing consumer habits in a globalised and digitalised world were the subject of lectures by Mark Messura, Cotton Incorporated and Robert Antoshak, Olah Inc. Eugen Weinberg and Michael Alt from Commerzbank took a look at the raw material from a stock market perspective.

Traceability and Digitalisation
Digitalisation is also a cross-cutting issue that runs through the entire supply chain of the cotton industry. In his opening speech, Prof. Axel S. Hermann, Head of the Fibre Institute Bremen, emphasised the importance of digitalisation for the industry. “It enables new approaches in cotton cultivation and textile processing, but also influences consumer behaviour and thus the necessary changes in the textile industry.” The focus is on the status quo of the implementation, as well as the opportunities and risks of digitally controlled, vertically integrated procurement and sales processes and the associated challenges at retail level.

Another current topic is traceability, which is also closely linked to sustainability. More and more buyers want to know whether their suppliers are meeting the promised sustainability criteria for their products, also textile products. Consequently, the conference presented various techniques for testing the authenticity of a cotton provided in the finished textile, such as DNA testing, fingerprint analysis technique, marker methods and block-chain processes.

Cotton Quality
In addition to current subjects such as digitalisation and traceability, questions of cotton quality have traditionally been an essential element of the Cotton Conference, which was further reinforced this year with the "Spinners Seminar". The spinning mill seminar, which was carried out by the Cotton Exchange and the Fibre Institute in cooperation with the ITMF and IVGT associations, far exceeded expectations.

More than 70 participants discussed the handling of impurities in supplied cotton in the manufacturing process.
In addition, in a high-level expert session, there was an exchange of the latest research results which determine the future of cotton production and the processing of cotton into innovative products.

Source:

BREMER BAUMWOLLBÖRSE

Baumwollpflücker Tanzania Bremer Baumwollbörse
Baumwollpflücker Tanzania
04.04.2017

Auf den Punkt gebracht: Baumwolle ist nachwachsend, wiederverwertbar und zu 100 % biologisch abbaubar

Mit den Attributen ‚nachwachsend‘, ‚wiederverwertbar‘ und ‚biologisch abbaubar‘ gehört Baumwolle aus ökologischer, sozialer und wirtschaftlicher Sicht für die Bremer Baumwollbörse zu den nachhaltigsten Rohstoffen der Erde überhaupt.

Die Natur schafft es, Baumwollreste im Boden je nach herrschenden Bedingungen innerhalb von sechs Monaten abzubauen, so dass sie ‚zur Erde‘ zurückkehren. Das gleiche gilt für Baumwollfasern, die durch Waschvorgänge von Bekleidung und Textilien in privaten Haushalten ins Abwasser und letztlich in Flüsse und Meere gelangen. Weil Baumwolle biologisch abbaubar ist, kann es in diesem Fall zu keiner Mensch und Tier sowie die Natur gefährdenden Situation kommen, wie dies bei dem wachsendem Problem von Mikroplastik im Meer oftmals befürchtet wird.

Mit den Attributen ‚nachwachsend‘, ‚wiederverwertbar‘ und ‚biologisch abbaubar‘ gehört Baumwolle aus ökologischer, sozialer und wirtschaftlicher Sicht für die Bremer Baumwollbörse zu den nachhaltigsten Rohstoffen der Erde überhaupt.

Die Natur schafft es, Baumwollreste im Boden je nach herrschenden Bedingungen innerhalb von sechs Monaten abzubauen, so dass sie ‚zur Erde‘ zurückkehren. Das gleiche gilt für Baumwollfasern, die durch Waschvorgänge von Bekleidung und Textilien in privaten Haushalten ins Abwasser und letztlich in Flüsse und Meere gelangen. Weil Baumwolle biologisch abbaubar ist, kann es in diesem Fall zu keiner Mensch und Tier sowie die Natur gefährdenden Situation kommen, wie dies bei dem wachsendem Problem von Mikroplastik im Meer oftmals befürchtet wird.

Baumwolle ist als Agrarprodukt ein nachwachsender Rohstoff, der je nach Klima oder Region ein- oder sogar zweimal pro Saison angebaut werden kann. Alle Teile der Pflanze finden Anwendung: Aus den Samenkörnern entstehen wertvolle Öle für die Lebensmittel- und Kosmetikindustrie. Aus den Fasern der Baumwolle werden Garne und Gewebe für Haus- und Heimtextilien, Bekleidung, Hygiene- und Medizinprodukte oder für ihren Einsatz bei technischen Anwendungen unter anderem den Leichtbau produziert. Nichtverspinnbare kurze Fasern, die Linters, verarbeitet die Papierindustrie, es können aber auch zum Beispiel Brillengestelle daraus hergestellt werden. Aus Baumwollresten entstehen Viehfutter, Produkte zur Bodenverbesserung oder Verpackungs- und Dämmmaterial Textil- und Bekleidungs-Produkte aus Baumwolle sind zu hundert Prozent recycelbar. Sie werden farblich sortiert, gelangen in den Reißwolf, werden zerkleinert und können dann als neue Garne und Gewebe für den Gebrauch in Bekleidung und Textilen verwendet werden.

More information:
Bremer Baumwollbörse Baumwolle
Source:

Bremer Baumwollbörse